Table of Contents

  • ESTEBDĀD-E ṢAGĪR

    Cross-Reference

    "the lesser tyranny." See CONSTITUTIONAL REVOLUTION.

  • ESTEBṢĀR

    Cross-Reference

    See ṬŪSĪ, ABŪ JAʿFAR.

  • EŠTEHĀRD

    Mīnū Yūsof-nežād

    a town and district (baḵš) in the province of Tehran.

  • EŠTEHĀRDĪ

    Gernot L. Windfuhr

    the easternmost of the nine Southern Tati (Tātī) dialects and sharing with the others most phonological, morphological, syntactic, and lexical features. These are part of a band of dialects extending from the Aras River to central Persia and farther east.

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  • ESTEḴĀRA

    Cross-Reference

    See DIVINATION.

  • ESTEQLĀL

    Nassereddin Parvin

    newspaper published by the constitutionalists who had taken refuge in the Ottoman consulate in Tabrīz during the Russian occupation of the city in 1909.

  • ESTEQLĀL-e ĪRĀN

    Nassereddin Parvin

    an evening daily published in Tehran from 31 May 1910-17 August 1911; it was the organ of the small Unity and Progress party (Ḥezb-e ettefāq o taraqqī) and was published by the party’s leader, the well-known constitutionalist Zayn-al-ʿĀbedīn Mostaʿān-al-Molk

  • ESTHER AND MORDECHAI

    Amnon Netzer

    a Jewish shrine in the city of Hamadān, where, according to Judeo-Persian tradition, Esther and Mordechai are buried.

  • ESTHER, BOOK OF

    Shaul Shaked

    a short book of the Old Testament, written in Hebrew.

  • ESTRĀBĀD

    Cross-Reference

    See ASTARĀBĀD.

  • EʿTEDĀLĪ, ḤEZB-E

    Cross-Reference

    See EJTEMĀʿĪYŪN.

  • EʿTEMĀD-AL-DAWLA

    Cross-Reference

    lit. “Confidant of the State”; an important title given to people in the administration favored by the court.

  • EʿTEMĀD-AL-DAWLA, ĀQĀ KHAN NŪRĪ

    Abbas Amanat

    , MĪRZĀ (1807-1865), prime minister (ṣadr-e aʿẓam) of Persia (1851-58) under Nāṣer-al-Dīn Shah Qajar. Though relatively young when he took office, he represented the old school of Qajar statecraft. His very appearance, with a long beard, ornamented robes, and lavish entourage, as well as his love of  titles, decorations and other emblems of power, and court protocol, all conjured up images of Fatḥ-ʿAlī Shah’s (d. 1834) era.

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  • EʿTEMĀD-AL-DAWLA, EBRĀHĪM KALĀNTAR

    Cross-Reference

    See EBRĀHĪM KALĀNTAR.

  • EʿTEMĀD-AL-DAWLA, GĪĀṮ-AL-DĪN MOḤAMMAD BEG TEHRĀNĪ

    Cross-Reference

    Gīāṯ-al-Dīn Moḥammad Tehrānī (d. 1622), prime minister of the Mughal emperor Jahāngīr and father of the emperor’s wife, Nūr Jahān. See GĪĀṮ BEG.

  • EʿTEMĀD-AL-SALṬANA, MOḤAMMAD-ḤASAN KHAN MOQADDAM MARĀḠAʾĪ

    Abbas Amanat

    or ṢANĪʿ-AL-DAWLA (1843-1896), Qajar statesman, scholar, and author.

  • EʿTEṢĀMĪ, MĪRZĀ YŪSOF KHAN ĀŠTĪĀNĪ, EʿTEṢĀM-AL-MOLK

    Heshmat Moayyad

    (b. Tabrīz, 1874; d. Tehran, 1938), Persian writer and journalist.

  • EʿTEṢĀMĪ, PARVĪN

    Heshmat Moayyad

    Parvīn was only seven or eight years old when her poetic talent revealed itself. Encouraged by her father, she rendered into verse some literary pieces that her father had translated from Western sources. Her earliest known poems, eleven compositions printed in 1921-22 issues of her father’s monthly magazine, Bahār, display maturity of thought and craft.

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  • EʿTEŻĀD-AL-DAWLA

    Cross-Reference

    See SOLAYMĀN KHAN QĀJĀR QOVĀNLŪ.

  • EʿTEŻĀD-AL-SALṬANA, ʿALĪQOLĪ MĪRZĀ

    Abbas Amanat

    (1822-1880), first minister of sciences (ʿolūm, meaning education) of the Qajar period and a scholar.