Table of Contents

  • ESKANDAR

    Cross-Reference

    See ALEXANDER THE GREAT.

  • ESKANDAR

    Cross-Reference

    See QĀBŪS b. VOŠMGĪR.

  • ESKANDAR B. JĀNĪ BEG

    Cross-Reference

    See ʿABD-ALLĀH KHAN b. ESKANDAR.

  • ESKANDAR BEG TORKAMĀN MONŠĪ

    Roger M. Savory

    sixteenth century author of Tārīḵ-e ʿālamārā-ye ʿabbāsī, a history of the reign of Shah ʿAbbās I.

  • ESKANDAR MĪRZĀ

    Cross-Reference

    pro-Persian member of the royal family of Georgia (b. 1770, d. after 1830).See ALEXANDER, PRINCE.

  • ESKANDAR SOLṬĀN

    Priscilla Soucek

    b. ʿOmar Šayḵ b. Tīmūr (1384-1415), Timurid prince who ruled a succession of cities in western Persia between 1403 and 1415 but is remembered mostly for his cultural patronage.

  • ESKANDAR-NĀMA

    William L. Hanaway

    Alexander the Great and the adventure tale about him known generically as the Alexander romance.

  • ESKANDAR-NĀMA OF NEŻĀMĪ

    François de Blois

    the poetical version of the life of Alexander by the great 12th century narrative poet Neẓāmī Ganjavī (1141-1209).

  • ESKANDARĪ, ĪRAJ

    Cosroe Chaqueri

    (1907-1985), prominent leader of the Tudeh Party. He was an architect of the coalition of the Tudeh party with prime minister Aḥmad Qawām in 1946. From 1948 he worked for the Tudeh party in Paris, Vienna, Budapest, Moscow, and finally Leipzig. His lukewarm attitude toward the Islamic Revolution and refusal of a Soviet offer to help turn Persia into another Afghanistan cost him his leadership position in 1979.

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  • ESKANDARĪ, MOḤTARAM

    Mehrangīz Dawlatšāhī

    a pioneer advocate of women’s rights in Persia (1895-1925) and the founder and leader of the first women’s association in Persia, namely Jamʿīyat-e taraqqī-e neswān, later Jamʿīyat-e neswān-e waṭanḵᵛāh (Society of Patriotic Women).

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  • ESKANDARĪ, SOLAYMĀN (MOḤSEN) MĪRZĀ

    Cosroe Chaqueri

    (1875-1944), constitutionalist, civil servant, statesman, founder of the Ejtemāʿīyūn (Socialists) political party in the 1920s. His interest in social justice and egalitarianism was more rooted in Islam than in the European Enlightenment or European socialism. A devout Muslim, he opposed women’s membership in the Tudeh party.

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  • ESKANDARĪYA

    Cross-Reference

    See ALEXANDRIA.

  • EŠKĀŠ(E)M

    C. Edmund Bosworth

    a settlement in medieval Badaḵšān in northeastern Afghanistan, now in the modern Afghan province of Eškāšem.

  • EŠKĀŠ(E)MĪ

    I. M. Steblin-Kamensky

    or Ishkashmi; one of the so-called “Pamir group” of the Eastern Iranian languages spoken in a few villages of the region of Eškāšem straddling the upper reaches of the Panj river.

  • ESKENĀS

    Ali Shargi

    bank note, paper currency. In 1888 an English-owned New Oriental Bank established branches in Tehran and other cities, and for the first time Persians became acquainted with a bank in the modern sense. in 1889, Baron Julius de Reuter obtained from Nāṣer-al-Dīn Shah the concession of establishing the Imperial Bank of Persia and the monopoly of issuing bank notes in Persia.

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  • EṢLĀḤ

    Nassereddin Parvin

    title of several Persian-language newspapers, especially the major 20th-century Kabul daily.

  • EṢLĀḤĀT-E ARŻĪ

    Cross-Reference

    See LAND REFORM.

  • ESLĀM

    Cross-Reference

    See ISLAM in IRAN.

  • ESLĀMĪYA

    Nassereddin Parvin

    title of two Persian newspapers first appearing in Tabrīz in 1906.

  • ESM

    Cross-Reference

    See PERSONAL NAMES; ALQĀB WA ʿANĀWĪN.