Table of Contents

  • ḤAMID-AL-DIN ABU BAKR BALḴI

    Cross-Reference

    See Supplement.

  • ḤAMID-AL-DIN KERMĀNI

    Farhad Daftary

    (d. after 1020-21), ABU’L-ḤASAN AḤMAD b. ʿAbd-Allāh b. Moḥammad, a prominent Ismaʿili dāʿi and one of the most accomplished Ismaʿili theologians and philosophers of the Fatimid period.

  • ḤAMIDI ŠIRĀZI

    Jafar Moayyad Shirazi

    Ḥamidi left Shiraz for Tehran in 1934 and enrolled in the Teachers College of Tehran University, where he received a B.A. degree in Persian Literature in 1937, graduating at the top of his class. He returned to Shiraz as a high school teacher, and a year later he published his first collection of poems, Šoku-fahā “Blossoms.”

    This Article Has Images/Tables.
  • HAMKALĀM

    Mary Boyce and Firoze Kotwal

    “of the same word, ” a Zoroastrian-Persian priestly technical term.

  • ḤAMMĀM-E WAKĪL

    Karāmat-Allāh Afsar

    (bathhouse of the Wakil), a historic monument in Shiraz built by Karim Khan Zand “the Wakil” (r. 1751-79) after 1776.

  • HAMMER-PURGSTALL, JOSEPH FREIHERR von

    J. T. P. de Bruijn

    (1774-1856), prolific Austrian orientalist, among whose many works is the first ever complete translation of the Divān of Ḥāfeẓ into a Western language.

  • HĀMUN, DARYĀČA-YE

    Eckart Ehlers, Gherardo Gnoli

    (or simply Hāmun), lit. “lake of the plain, lowland,” a lake covering the deepest part of the Sistān depression and the Sistān watershed.

  • HĀMUN, DARYĀČA-YE i. GEOGRAPHY

    Eckart Ehlers

    The Sistān basin is the easternmost endorheic basin in Persia, draining a watershed 350,000 km2.

  • HĀMUN, DARYĀČA-YE ii. IN LITERATURE AND MYTHOLOGY

    Gherardo Gnoli

    In the literature and mythology of ancient Persia, Lake Hāmun occupied, along with the Helmand Riiver, a position of particular importance, especially in Zoroastrian eschatology.

  • ḤAMZA B. ĀḎARAK

    C. Edmund Bosworth

    or Atrak or ʿAbd-Allāh Abu Ḵozayma (d. 828), Kharijite rebel in Sistān and Khorasan during early ʿAbbasid times.

  • HAMZA NİGARİ

    Tahsin Yazi

    (Ḥamza Negāri) Ḥāji Mir Ḥamza Efendi b. Mir Pāšā, Sufi and poet from Azerbaijan, who wrote in both Persian and Turkish (d. 1886).

  • ḤAMZA-NĀMA

    William L. Hanaway, Jr., Frances W. Pritchett

    a popular prose romance transmitted orally and written down at a time unknown.

  • ḤAMZA-NĀMA i. GENERAL

    William L. Hanaway, Jr.

    The hero of Ḥamza-nāma is Ḥamza b. ʿAbd-al-Moṭṭaleb, whose adventures are thought to be a conflation of stories from eastern Persia about Ḥamza b. ʿAbd-Allāh the Kharijite (d. 797-8).

  • ḤAMZA-NĀMA ii. In the Subcontinent

    Frances W. Pritchett

    The Indo-Persian romance tradition, extending from the medieval period to the early 20th century, produced prose works of considerable literary and cultural interest, chief among which were many versions of the Ḥamza romance.

  • HANAFITE MAḎHAB

    Merlin Swartz

    a school of Sunni jurisprudence named after Abu Ḥanifa Noʿmān b. Ṯābet (699-767), an early Kufan jurist and theologian of Persian descent.

  • HANBALITE MAḎHAB

    Merlin Swartz

    a school of Sunni law and theology named after Aḥmad b. Ḥanbal (d. 855) which was founded largely under his influence in Baghdad.

  • HANG-E AFRĀSIĀB

    A. Sh. Shahbazi

    in the national epic, the cave in which Afrāsiāb, the fugitive king of Turān, spent his last days.

  • HĀNIBĀL, ʿALI

    Ali Boloukbashi

    (1891-1966), Russian-born Persian scholar and founder of the first journal of anthropology (majalla-ye mardom-šenāsi) in Persia.

  • HĀNSAVI

    S. H. Qasemi

    (1184/85-1260/61), Shaikh, mystic, poet, and author.

  • HANWAY, JONAS

    Ernest Tucker

    (1712-86), an English merchant who traveled to Persia and wrote an account of the trip which provides an eyewitness view of northern Iran during Nāder Shah’s last years.