Table of Contents

  • HAMADĀN viii. JEWISH COMMUNITY

    Houman Sarshar

    The relative religious freedom that existed in Persia at Yudḡān’s time had widespread effects on the Jewish communities,  in Hamadān in particular. Religious authorities of the two Talmudic schools in Iraq were able to better influence the Jewish communities of Persia, opening yeshivas in Hamadān.

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  • HAMADĀN ix. JEWISH DIALECT

    Donald Stilo

    According to Ehsan Yarshater’s informants, the Jewish community had dwindled from around 13,000 souls in 1920 to less than 1,000 by 1969, and of these about half originated from the Jewish communities of Malāyer, Tuyserkān, and various points in Kurdistan. 

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  • HAMADĀNI, ABU YAʿQUB YUSOF

    cross-reference

    See ABU YAʿQUB HAMADĀNI.

  • HAMADĀNI, BADIʿ-AL-ZAMĀN

    cross-reference

    See BADIʿ-AL-ZAMĀN HAMADĀNI.

  • HAMADĀNI, SAYYED ʿALI

    Parviz Aḏkāʾi

    b. Sayyed Šehāb-al-Din (1314-1384), Sufi author and preacher who undertook a celebrated mission to convert the people of Kashmir to Islam.

  • HAMADĀNIĀN FACTORIES AND ENDOWMENTS

    Habib Borjian

    Established by ʿAli Hamadāniān (1907-63) and his brother Ḥosayn (1909-78), entrepreneurs and industrialists based in Isfahan, these include textile, cement, and sugar factories.

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  • HAMAN

    Shaul Shaked

    the chief courtier of King Ahasuerus (Xerxes), according to the story of the Book of Esther in the Hebrew Bible. He is portrayed as the villain of the narrative.

  • HAMĀRAKARA

    Muhammad A.Dandamayev

    (*hmāra-kara-, lit. “account-maker”), “bookkeeper,” an Old Iranian title attested in various sources of Achaemenid and later times.

  • HAMASPATHMAĒDAYA

    cross-reference

    See GĀHANBĀR; FRAWARDIGĀN.

  • ḤAMĀVAND

    Pierre Oberling

    (from MOḤAMMADVAND), a Kurdish tribe of northeastern Iraq which has been described as “the most celebrated fighting tribe of southern Kurdistan.”

  • ḤAMAYD

    Pierre Oberling

    an Arab tribe of Ḵuzestān. In the early 1900s, it dwelled mostly in the boluk of Ḥamayd, on the left bank of the Kārun river.

  • HAMĀZŌR

    Mary Boyce and F. M. Kotwal

    a Zoroastrian Persian adjective “of the same strength” which occurs only in a formula of greeting, in ritual uses accompanied by the giving of hands.

  • ḤAMD-ALLĀH MOSTAWFI

    Charles Melville

    historian and geographer of the Il-khanid period (1281-1344), author of Tāriḵ-e gozida, Ẓafar-nāma, and Nozhat al-qolub.

  • ḤAMDĀN QARMAṬ

    Wilferd Madelung

    b. al-Ašʿaṯ (d. 933), Ismaʿili dāʿi and founder of the Ismaʿili movement in Iraq.

  • HAMDARD ISLAMICUS

    Ansar Zahid Khan

    English-language quarterly for Islamic Studies, founded in Pakistan in 1978. Published by the Hamdard Foundation of Pakistan.

  • ḤĀMED BAL-ḴEŻR AL-ḴOJANDI

    David Pingree

    ABU MAḤMUD, mathematician and astronomer of the 10th century. His nesba suggests that he originated from Ḵojand in Ferḡāna.

  • ḤĀMEDI EṢFAHĀNI

    Tahsin Yazici

    (or Ḥāmedi ʿAjam), a poet of Persian origin (1439-ca. 1485) at the court of the Ottoman Sultan Moḥammad Fāteḥ (Mehmed the Conquerer).

  • HAMĒSTAGĀN

    Philippe Gignoux

    a word of uncertain etymology, used in Pahlavi literature to designate the intermediate stage between paradise and hell.

  • HAMGAR, MAJD-AL-DIN

    Ḏabiḥ-Allāh Ṣafā

    (1210-1287), MAJD-AL-DIN B. AḤMAD, known also as Ebn-e Hamgar (hamgar means “weaver”), an important poet of the 13th century.

  • ḤAMID QALANDAR

    Khaliq Ahmad Nizami

    (d. 1366), author of Ḵayr al-majāles, the obiter dicta (malfuẓāt) of the Češti shaikh Naṣir-al-Din Maḥmud Čerāḡ-e Dehli, Ḥamid’s father,