Table of Contents

  • ESFAHANI, Jaleh

    Shadab Vajdi

    (Žāla Eṣfahāni, b. Esfahan, 1921; d. London, 29 November 2007), poet and political activist. Esfahani’s poetry is ensconced in the tradition of Persian prosody. With few exceptions, she adheres to the metrical traditions of classical Persian poetry. She frequently borrows imageries from poets of the classical period and adapts them to the requirements of her politically laden poems.

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  • EṢFAHĀNI, MOḤAMMAD MAʿṢUM

    Kioumars Ghereghlou

    (ca. 1597-ca. 1647), Safavid bureaucrat and historian, whose history entitled the Ḵolāṣat al-siar chronicles the reign of Shah Ṣafi.

  • ESFAHSĀLĀR

    Cross-Reference

    See SEPAHSĀLĀR.

  • ESFAND

    Mahmoud Omidsalar

    a common weed found in Persia, Central Asia, and the adjacent areas.

  • ESFANDĪĀR (1)

    Ehsan Yarshater

    son of Goštāsp, Kayanian prince of Iranian legendary history and hero of Zoroastrian holy wars, best known for his tragic combat with with Rostam, the mightiest warrior of Iranian national epic.

  • ESFANDĪĀR (2)

    Ehsan Yarshater

    one of the seven great clans of Parthian and Sasanian times.

  • ESFANDĪĀR KHAN BAḴTĪĀRĪ, ṢAMṢĀM-AL-SALṬANA, SARDĀR(-E) ASʿAD

    G. R. Garthwaite

    (1844-1902), important leader of the Baḵtīārī tribe in southwestern Persia and grandfather of Queen Ṯorayyā.

  • ESFANDĪĀRĪ, ḤĀJJ MOḤTAŠAM-AL-SALṬANA ḤASAN

    Bāqer ʿĀqelī

    (b. 23 April 1867; d. 24 February 1945), politician, governor, and speaker of the Majles.

  • ESFARA

    Habib Borjian

    a district in the Fergana valley south of the Jaxartes which extends to the foothills of the Turkestan range.

  • ESFARĀYEN

    C. Edmund Bosworth

    or ESFARĀʾĪN; a district, and in pre-modern Islamic times, a town, of northwestern Khorasan.

  • ESFEZĀRĪ, ABŪ ḤĀTEM

    Cross-Reference

    5th/12th-century astronomer. See ASFEZĀRĪ, ABŪ ḤĀTEM.

  • ESFEZĀRĪ, MOʿĪN-AL-DĪN MOḤAMMAD ZAMČĪ

    MARIA E. Subtelny

    (ca. 1446-1510), calligrapher specializing in the taʿlīq script, minor poet (pen name Nāmī), and master of the epistolary art who flourished in Herat during the reign of the Timurid Solṭān-Ḥosayn Bāyqarā.

  • ESFĪJĀB

    Cross-Reference

    See ASFĪJĀB.

  • ESḤĀQ

    Mohsen Zakeri

    b. ṬOLAYQ (or Ṭalīq), the secretary responsible for translating the financial dīvāns of Khorasan into Arabic in 741-42.

  • ESḤĀQ AḤMAR NAḴAʿI

    Mushegh Asatryan

    a prominent Shiʿi extremist active in Iraq, founder of the Esḥāqiya ḡolāt sect, and the supposed author of a number of texts.

  • ESḤĀQ KHAN QARĀʾĪ TORBATĪ

    Kambiz Eslami

    (ca. 1743-1816), one of the wealthiest and most powerful chieftains in Khorasan during the reigns of Āḡā Moḥammad Khan and Fatḥ-ʿAlī Shah Qājār.

  • ESḤĀQ MAWṢELĪ

    Everett K. Rowson

    (767?-850), prominent musician at the ʿAbbasid court in Baghdad and the successor of his equally famous father Ebrāhīm Mawṣelī as leader of the conservative school of musicians of the time.

  • ESḤĀQ TORK

    ʿAbd-al-Ḥosayn Zarrīnkūb

    propagandist sent by Abū Moslem Ḵorāsānī (governor of Khorasan and leading figure in the ʿAbbasid revolution) to the Turkish people of Transoxania.

  • ESḤAQĪYA

    Cross-Reference

    See ḠOLĀT.

  • ESḤĀQZĪ

    Daniel Balland

    The geographical distribution of the tribe shows the dualism typical to those Pashtun tribes who have massively taken part in the colonization of North Afghanistan, a process in which the Esḥāqzī played a leading role.

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