Table of Contents

  • BĀDGĪR

    S. Roaf

    (wind-tower), literally “wind catcher,” a traditional structure used for passive air-conditioning of buildings. Yazd is known as šahr-e bādgīrhā (the city of wind catchers) and is renowned for the number and variety of them, some of which date from the Timurid period.

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  • BĀḎḠĪS

    C. E. Bosworth, D. Balland

    During the first century of Islam, Bāḏḡīs passed into Arab hands, together with Herat and Pūšang, around 652-53, under the caliph ʿOṯmān, for already in that year there is mentioned a rebellion against the Arabs by an Iranian noble Qāren, followed by further unrest in these regions in 661-62.

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  • BĀDHĀ ḴABAR AZ TAḠYIR-e FAṢL MIDĀDAND

    Soheila Saremi

    (The winds presaged the changing of season), a novel by the eminent fiction writer and literary critic, Jamal Mirsadeqi. Set in the 1960s in Tehran and revolves around the turbulent life of Ḥamid, the novel’s narrator, and his cast of friends and neighbors of poverty-stricken families.

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  • BADĪʿ (1)

    J. T. P. de Bruijn

    rhetorical embellishment. During the early Islamic period the word developed into a technical term through its use in discussions about Arabic poetry and ornate prose.

  • BADĪʿ (2)

    D. M. MacEoin

    designation of the calendar system of Babism and Bahaism, originally introduced by the Bāb.

  • BADĪʿ BALḴĪ

    Z. Safa

    Persian poet of the 10th century.

  • BADĪʿ KĀTEB JOVAYNĪ, MOḤAMMAD

    Cross-Reference

    See KĀTEB JOVAYNĪ.

  • BADĪʿ, ĀQĀ BOZORG

    M. Momen

    (d. 1869), a young Bahai martyr who has gained a certain distinction in Bahai lore.

  • BADĪʿ-AL-ZAMĀN

    M. E. Subtelny

    (d. ca. 1514), Timurid prince, who rebelled against his father,  Sultan Ḥosayn Bāyqarā (r. Herat 1469-1506).

  • BADĪʿ-AL-ZAMĀN HAMADĀNĪ

    F. Malti-Douglas

    (968-1008), Arabic belle-lettrist and inventor of the maqāma genre. His maqāmāt are a set of adventures narrated in rhymed prose and poetry, revolving around a rogue hero and a narrator.

  • BADĪʿ-AL-ZAMĀN MĪRZĀ

    R. D. McChesney

    by most accounts the last of the Chaghatay/Timurid rulers of Badaḵšān (d. ca. 1603). 

  • BADĪʿ-AL-ZAMĀN NAṬANZĪ

    Cross-Reference

    See ADĪB NAṬANZĪ.

  • BADĪHA-SARĀʾĪ

    F. R. C. Bagley

    composition and utterance of something improvised (badīh), usually in verse. Among the Arabs, poetic improvisation was practiced and admired from pre-Islamic times. Among the Iranians, it has been a mark of poetical talent and skill.

  • BADĪLĪ, AḤMAD

    H. Algar

    , SHAIKH, a Sufi shaikh in 12th-century Sabzavār, renowned for his mastery of the exoteric as well as the esoteric science. 

  • BĀDKŪBA

    Cross-Reference

    See BAKU.

  • BĀDPĀYĀN

    Cross-Reference

    See ARTHROPODS.

  • BADR ČĀČĪ

    M. Dabīrsīāqī

    a Persian poet of the 14th century, born in the town or district of Čāč (also written Šāš) in Transoxiana.

  • BADR JĀJARMĪ

    M. Dabīrsīāqī

    a 13th-century poet popular in his own time for his rhetorical skills.

  • BADR KHAN

    Cross-Reference

    See BEDIR KHAN.

  • BADR-AL-DĪN EBRĀHĪM

    S. I. Baevskiĭ

    author of the Persian dictionary Farhang-e zafāngūyā wa jahānpūyā (The eloquent and world-seeking dictionary) composed in India in the late 14th or early 15th century.