Table of Contents

  • BĀBĀ SANKŪ

    H. Algar

    ecstatic Central Asian dervish of disorderly habits, contemporary with Timur (d. 1405) and one of several Sufis with whom Timur chose to associate for reasons of state.

  • BĀBĀ SHAH ESFAHĀNI

    Pricilla Soucek

    calligrapher and poet who lived in Isfahan and Baghdad where he died in 1587-88. He was famous as a writer of the nastaʿlīq script.

  • BĀBĀ ṬĀHER ʿORYĀN

    L. P. Elwell-Sutton

    medieval dervish poet from the area of Hamadān, best known for his do-baytīs, quatrains composed  in a simpler meter still widely used for popular verse.

  • BĀBĀ-YE DEHQĀN

    Anna Krasnowolska

    a mythological and ritual character whose cult has been reported in agrarian communities of mountainous and lowland Tajikistan, northern Afghanistan, and adjacent countries.

  • BĀBĀʾĪ BEN FARHĀD

    Amnon Netzer

    18th-century author of a versified history of the Jews of Kāšān with brief references to the Jews of Isfahan and one or two other towns.

  • BĀBĀʾĪ BEN LOṬF

    Amnon Netzer

    Jewish poet and historian of Kāšān during the first half of the 17th century (d. after 1662).

  • BĀBĀʾĪ BEN NŪRĪʾEL

    Amnon Netzer

    rabbi (ḥāḵām) from Isfahan;  at the behest of Nāder Shah Afšār (r. 1736-47), he translated the Pentateuch and the Psalms of David from Hebrew into Persian.

  • BABĀJĀʾĪ

    Cross-Reference

    See KURDISTAN TRIBES.

  • BĀBAK (1)

    R. N. Frye

    (Mid. Pers. Pāpak, Pābag), a ruler of Fārs at the beginning of the third century, father of Ardašīr, the founder of the Sasanian dynasty.  

  • BĀBAK

    Touraj Daryaee

    reformer of the Sasanian military and in charge of the department of the warriors (Diwān al-moqātela) during the reign of Ḵosrow I Anušervān in the 6th century CE. 

  • BĀBAK ḴORRAMI

    Ḡ. -Ḥ. Yūsofī

    leader of the Ḵorramdīnī or Ḵorramī uprising in Azerbaijan in the early 9th century (d. 838), which engaged the forces of the caliph for 20 years before it was crushed in 837.

  • BĀBAKĪYA

    Cross-Reference

    See ḴORRAMĪS.

  • BABAN

    C. E. Bosworth

    (or Bavan), a small town in the medieval Islamic province of Bāḏḡīs, to the north and west of Herat.

  • BĀBĀN

    W. Behn

    (or Baban), Kurdish princely family in Solaymānīya, ruling an area in Iraqi Kurdistan and western Iran (17th—19th centuries) and actively involved in the Perso-Ottoman struggles.

  • BĀBĀN DYNASTY

    Cross-Reference

    See ĀL-E BĀBĀN.

  • BĀBAY

    A. Vööbus

    catholicos of the Persian Church elected at the synod at Seleucia in 497 (d. 502).

  • BĀBAY OF NISIBIS

    N. Sims-Williams

    Christian Syriac writer who flourished about the beginning of the seventh century CE; a homily of his is attested in Sogdian.

  • BĀBAY THE GREAT

    A. Vööbus

    (d. 628), abbot and prominent leader in the Nestorian church in Iran under Ḵosrow II.

  • BĀBEL

    Cross-Reference

    See BABYLON.

  • BABILLA, ASHUR BANIPAL IBRAHIM

    Khosro Shayesteh

    In acting also, just as did Artaud, Bani placed heavy emphasis on invoking deeply rooted feelings of the actors and argued that “while actors are wearing masks in their daily lives, in theater, these masks are torn off and we are facing the inner self of the actor.”

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