Table of Contents

  • AḤMAD B. ASAD

    C. E. Bosworth

    (d. 250/864), early member of the Samanid family and governor of Farḡāna under the ʿAbbasids and Taherids.

  • AḤMAD B. AYYŪB

    A. A. Kalantarian

    7th-8th/13th-14th Azerbaijani architect, one of the best representatives of the architectural school of Naḵǰavān.

  • AḤMAD B. BAHBAL

    Hameed ud-Din

    Mughal historian and author of a Persian work, Maʿdan-e aḵbār-e Aḥmadī, also known as Maʿdan-e aḵbār-e Jahāngīrī

  • AḤMAD B. FAŻLĀN

    C. E. Bosworth

    author of an extremely important travel narrative written after he had been a member of an embassy in the early 4th/10th century from the ʿAbbasid caliphate to the ruler of the Bulghars on the middle Volga in Russia.

  • AḤMAD B. ḤOSAYN

    İ. Aka

    historian of the 9th/15th century born in Yazd, author of the Tārīḵ-e ǰadīd-e Yazd

  • AḤMAD B. JAʿFAR

    D. M. Dunlop

    poet, man of letters, musician, wit, and bon vivant at the court of several ʿAbbasid caliphs, hence sometimes called al-Nadīm.

  • AḤMAD B. MOḤAMMAD

    C. E. Bosworth

    (r. 311-52/923-63), amir in Sīstān of the Saffarid dynasty (that part of it sometimes called “the second Saffarid dynasty”).

  • AḤMAD B. MOḤAMMAD B. ṬĀHER

    C. E. Bosworth

    governor in Ḵᵛārazm and son of the last Tahirid governor in Khorasan. 

  • AḤMAD B. NEẒĀM-AL-MOLK

    C. E. Bosworth

    (d. 1149-50), son of the well-known Saljuq vizier (d. 485/1092) and himself vizier for the Great Saljuqs and then for the ʿAbbasid caliphs. 

  • AḤMAD B. ʿOMAR B. SORAYJ

    T. Nagel

    Shafeʿite author from Shiraz (249/863-306/918-19)/

  • AḤMAD B. QODĀM

    C. E. Bosworth

    a military adventurer who temporarily held power in Sīstān during the confused years following the collapse of the first Saffarid amirate and the military empire of ʿAmr b. Layṯ in 287/900.

  • AḤMAD B. SAHL B. HĀŠEM

    C. E. Bosworth

    governor in Khorasan during the confused struggles for supremacy there between the Saffarids, Samanids, and various military adventures in the late 3rd/9th and early 4th/10th century, d. 307/920. 

  • AḤMAD ČARMPŪŠ

    S. H. Askari

    (ČERAMPŌŠ), Sohravardī poet-saint of 14th century Bihar (d. 26 Ṣafar 755/22 March 1354).

  • AḤMAD HERAVĪ

    D. Pingree

    one of the many eminent astronomers employed by the Buyids in the 4th/10th century.

  • AḤMAD INALTIGIN

    C. E. Bosworth

    Turkish commander and rebel under the early Ghaznavid sultan Masʿūd I (421-32/1030-41), d. 426/1035.

  • AḤMAD KĀSĀNĪ

    J. Fletcher

    (1461-62—1542-43), known as MAḴDŪM-E AʿẒAM, Sufi, author of about thirty religious treatises, political activist, and founding ancestor of two important saintly lineages of Naqšbandī ḵᵛāǰagān.

  • AḤMAD KHATTŪ

    K. A. Nizami

    famous medieval Gujarati saint whose name is associated with the foundation of the city of Ahmadabad (b. Delhi, 737/1336; d. Sarkhej, 10 Šawwal 849/9 January 1446).

  • AḤMAD ḴOJESTĀNĪ

    C. E. Bosworth

    military commander in 3rd/9th century Khorasan, one of several contenders for authority in the region after the collapse of Taherid rule had left a power vacuum, d. 268/882.

  • AḤMAD MAYMANDĪ

    Ḡ. Ḥ. Yūsofī

    (d. 424/1032), Ghaznavid vizier, statesman, and foster brother and schoolfellow of Sultan Maḥmūd of Ḡazna (r. 388-421/998-1030).

  • AḤMAD MŪSĀ

    P. P. Soucek

    8th/14th century painter.