Table of Contents

  • HOTZ, ALBERT PAUL HERMAN

    Cyrus Ala’i

    a Dutch trader, collector of artifacts, and author on Iran (1855-1930).

  • HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

    cross-reference

    or parliament of Iran, the Majles. See CONSTITUTIONAL REVOLUTION

     

    Unpublished as per M.A. email - 5/28/2014

  • HOUSING IN IRAN

    Habibollah Zanjani

    This entry examines: (1) the growth of housing units during 1966-96; (2) housing policies adopted in various development plans and the results; (3) main characteristics of housing in Iran; and (4) investment in, and economics of, housing.

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  • HOUTUM-SCHINDLER, ALBERT

    John D. Gurney

    (1846-1916), Sir, engineer and employee of the Persian government for over thirty years in the later 19th and early 20th centuries; he was both loyal and knowledgeable.

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  • HOVEYDA, AMIR-ABBAS

    Abbas Milani

    (Amir ʿAbbās Hoveydā; 1919-1979), the longest serving prime minister in the modern history of Iran (1964-1977). His tenure  can be divided into two phases. In the 1960s, he was full of optimism and energy; in the 1970s he was characterized by cynicism, a clinging attachment to power and its perks, and an almost despondent air of resignation. What remained the same were his economic policies.

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  • HUART, CLÉMENT

    Jean Calmard

    French orientalist (1854-1926), especially known as editor and translator of Arabic, Persian, and Turkish sources and prolific author of works covering many aspects of Oriental studies.

  • HÜBSCHMANN, (JOHANN) HEINRICH

    Erich Kettenhofen and Rüdiger Schmitt

    Hübschmann felt himself to be an orientalist. Originally an Iranian scholar, through his fundamental studies he became also the founder of modern Armenian linguistics; for it was he who created a solid basis for future historical-comparative research in this field.

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  • ḪUDIMIRI

    Inna Medvedskaya

    a peripheral district and city in Elam, mentioned only in the 7th century BCE, in the Assyrian sources during the reign of Ashurbanapal.

  • HŪGAR

    cross-reference

    See ALBORZ.

  • HŪITI

    cross-reference

    See AVESTAN PEOPLE.

  • HUḴT

    Nassereddin Parvin

    monthly periodical published in Persian by Iranian Zoroastrians, 1950-84.

  • HULĀGU KHAN

    Reuven Amitai

    fifth son of Tolui (and thus grandson of Čengiz Khan) and founder of the Il-khanid dynasty (b. ca. 1215, d. 1265).

  • HUMAN MIGRATION

    Mehdi Amani and Habibollah Zanjani

    This subject includes three types of human migration in modern Iran: (1) migration within the country; (2) immigration of foreign nationals to Iran; and (3) emigration of Iranians to foreign countries.

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  • HUMATA HŪXTA HUVARŠTA

    Mary Boyce

    three Avestan words which encapsulate the ethical goals of Zoroastrianism. In form verbal adjectives,  they were substantivized to mean “good thought, good word, good act.”

  • HUMBAN

    cross-reference

    See ELAM vi.

  • HUMOR

    J. T. P. de Bruijn

    The making of jokes. In the present article the focus will be on description and classification of the types of humor that can be found in Persian literary sources, mainly belonging to the classical period.

  • HUMORALISM

    Amir Arsalan Afkhami

    (ṭebb-e jālinusi/ṭebb-e yunāni), or Galenism, a medical philosophy that considers illness as an imbalance in the body’s four elemental humors. which are identified as blood, phlegm, yellow bile, and black bile. Each of these humors is believed to possess two natures: hot or cold and dry or moist.

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  • HUMORS

    cross-reference

    See HUMORALISM.

  • HUNGARY ii. Iranian and Persian Studies in Hungary

    Keith Hitchins

    The Polish diplomats and the literary professionals were among the first to study and translate Persian literary works in the 18th century Europe.

  • HUNNIC COINAGE

    Michael Alram

    coins struck from the late fourth to the early eighth century by successive Central Asian invaders (so-called Iranian Huns) of northeastern Iran and northwestern India. It must be emphasized that our knowledge of these Central Asian nomads is, to a certain extent, still vague; and the research on their history is controversial.

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