Table of Contents

  • HONEY

    Hushang Aʿlam

    (ʿasal, archaic Pers. angobin).  In Iranian lore, according to the Nowruz-nāma, Hušang, the second  Pišdādiān king, first “brought out honey from the zanbur (“wasp”).

  • ḤOQAYNI

    Wilferd Madelung

    the nesba of two 11th-century Zaydi Imams, father and son, scholars of religious law.

  • ḤOQUQ

    Nassereddin Parvin

    the name of various 20th-century periodicals in Iran and Afghanistan.

  • ḤOQUQ-E EMRUZ

    Nassereddin Parvin

    a journal published irregularly in Tehran, 1963-76.

  • HORDĀD

    Antonio Panaino

    “Integrity (of body), Wholeness”, one of the Avestan entities (AMƎŠA SPƎNTA), normally mentioned in association with Amərətāt (AMURDĀD) already in the Gāθās.

  • HORMIZD

    cross-reference

    See HORMOZD i.

  • HORMOZĀN

    A. Shapur Shahbazi

    one of the last military leaders of Sasanian Persia, a member of one of the seven great families of Sasanian Persia (d. 644).

  • HORMOZD (1)

    cross-reference

    See AHURA MAZDĀ.

  • HORMOZD (2)

    A. Shapur Shahbazi

    (Ormisdas), a brother of the Sasanian great king Šāpur II (r. 307-79 CE), who participated on the Roman side in the emperor Julian’s Persian expedition of 363 CE.

  • HORMOZD I

    M. RAHIM SHAYEGAN

    Sasanian great king (r. 272-73 CE), the throne name of Šāpur I’s son and and successor, Hormozd-Ardašēr.

  • HORMOZD II

    A. Shapur Shahbazi

    Sasanian great king (r. 303-09 CE). He assumed a crown very similar to that of Bahrām II,  representing the varəγna, the royal falcon.

  • HORMOZD III

    A. Shapur Shahbazi

    Sasanian great king (r. 457-59 C.E.). He was the eldest son and heir of Yazdegerd II and “was king of Sejestān" (Ṭabari).

  • HORMOZD IV

    A. Shapur Shahbazi

    Sasanian great king (r. 579-90 CE). He succeeded Ḵosrow I Anōširavān just as the latter was negotiating a peace treaty with the Byzantine empire.

  • HORMOZD V

    A. Shapur Shahbazi

    Sasanian great king (r. 630-32 CE) in the turbulent years following the murder of Ḵosrow II Parvēz (628).

  • HORMOZD KUŠĀNŠĀH

    A. Shapur Shahbazi

    Sasanian prince governor of Kušān. He is known from his coins minted in eastern Iran and references in three Latin sources. His coins are gold scyphate (cup-shaped) and light bronze issues; rare heavy copper and silver coins also occur.

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  • HORMOZDGĀN

    A. Shapur Shahbazi

    BATTLE OF, the engagement which brought Ardašir I and the Sasanian dynasty to power, 28 April 224 CE.

  • HORMOZGĀN PROVINCE

    Cross-Reference

    See Supplement.

  • HORMOZI, SAʿID

    Jean During

    Said Hormozi did not perform in public, worked as a bank employee, and frequented musical circles such as that of Solaymān Amir Qāsemi, who preserved the purity of Persian music. He was a Sufi affiliated to the Ṣafi-ʿAlišāh brotherhood and entered a state of profound meditation when he played the setār, which made his music particularly captivating.

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  • HORMUZ i. PRE-ISLAMIC PERIOD

    D. T. Potts

    island and a strategic strait (Tanga-ye Hormoz) in the Persian Gulf, linking it to the Gulf of Oman, as well as the name of a medieval port near the strait.

  • HORMUZ ii. ISLAMIC PERIOD

    Willem Floor

    Hormuz fell to the Arabs in 650-51. In the 10th century, the town of Hormuz was the chief port for Kermān and Sistān, although the main Persian Gulf port was Jannāba. It was known for its cultivation of a variety of millet (ḏorra), indigo, cumin, and sugarcane.

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