Table of Contents

  • DAY

    W. W. Malandra

    (Av. daδuuah-, Pahl. day “creator”), an epithet of Ahura Mazdā that became the name of the tenth month, as well as of the eighth, fifteenth, and twenty-third days in each month of the Zoroastrian calendar.

  • DĀYA

    Mahmoud Omidsalar and Theresa Omidsalar

    wet nurse.

  • DĀYA, NAJM-AL-DĪN ABŪ BAKR ʿABD-ALLĀH

    Moḥammad-Amīn Rīāḥī

    b. Moḥammad b. Šāhāvar b. Anūšervān Rāzī (1177–1256), mystic and author.

  • DAYEAKUTʿIWN

    Robert G. Bedrosian

    a form of child rearing practiced in Armenia and other parts of the Caucasus.

  • DĀYERAT AL-MAʿĀREF-E FĀRSĪ

    Dāryūš Āšūrī

    the first general encyclopedia in Persian compiled along modern lines.

  • DAYLAMITES

    Cross-Reference

    people inhabiting a shifting region in northern Persia and adjacent territories, including the Deylamān uplands. See DEYLAMITES; BUYIDS.

  • DAYR

    QAMAR ĀRYĀN

    monastery; in early Islamic Arabic and Persian literature usually a building in which Christian monks (rāheb) lived and worshiped.

  • DAYR AL-ʿĀQŪL

    C. Edmund Bosworth

    lit., “the monastery at the bend in the river”; a medieval town in Iraq situated on the Tigris 15 farsangs (= 80 km) southeast of Baghdad.

  • DAYR-E GAČĪN

    Mehrdad Shokoohy

    lit., “gypsum hospice”;  Sasanian caravansary situated in the desert halfway between Ray and Qom, on the ancient route from Ray to Isfahan. It is recorded in most early Muslim geographies. Over time, it underwent major reconstruction at least twice.

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  • DAYSAM

    C. Edmund Bosworth

    b. Ebrāhīm KORDĪ, ABŪ SĀLEM, Kurdish commander who ruled sporadically in Azerbaijan between 938 and 955 after the period of Sajid domination there.