Table of Contents

  • DAWLATĀBĀD

    Daniel Balland

    name of several localities in Afghanistan that have grown up around civil or military government buildings.

  • DAWLATĀBĀDĪ, SAYYED ʿALĪ-MOḤAMMAD

    Cyrus Amir-Mokri

    (b. Dawlatābād, 1868, d. Tehran, Šawwāl May-June 1923), prominent politician and deputy of the Persian parliament.

  • DAWLATĀBĀDĪ, SAYYED YAḤYĀ

    Abbas Amanat

    (b. Dawlatābād. near Isfahan, 8 January 1863, d. Tehran, 26 October 1939), educator, political activist, and memoirist of the constitutional and postconstitutional periods.

  • DAWLATĀBĀDĪ, ṢEDDĪQA

    Mehranguiz Manoutchehrian

    (b. Isfahan, 1883, d. Tehran, 28 July 1961), journalist, educator, and pioneer in the movement to emancipate women in Persia.

  • DAWLATḴĒL

    Daniel Balland

    tribal name common among the eastern Pashtun at various levels of tribal segmentation.

  • DAWLATŠĀH SAMARQANDĪ

    ḎABĪH-ALLĀH ṢAFĀ

    (b. ca. 1438, d. 1494 or 1507), one of the few authors before the 16th century to have devoted a work entirely to poets, arranged more or less chronologically.

  • DAWLATŠĀH, MOḤAMMAD-ʿALĪ MĪRZĀ

    Abbas Amanat

    (1789-1821), eldest son of Fatḥ-ʿAlī Shah and powerful prince-governor of western provinces of Persia.

  • DAWLATZĪ

    Daniel Balland

    (singular Dawlatzay), ethnic name common among the eastern Pashtun on both sides of the Durand Line.

  • DAWR (1)

    Farhad Daftary

    (Ar. and Pers.), period, era, or cycle of history, a term used by Ismaʿilis in connection with their conceptions of time and the religious history of mankind.

  • DAWR (2)

    Jean During

    (Ar. and Pers. “circle”), term applied to scales and also to rhythmic cycles, both commonly diagramed as circles in classical musicology of Persian, Arab, and Turkish groups. Such diagrams are appropriate for representing both the cyclical nature of the scales and the periodic nature of rhythmic formulas.

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