Table of Contents

  • DAVID OF ASHBY

    Peter Jackson

    (fl. 1260-75), Dominican friar and visitor to Il-khanid Persia.

  • DAVID, JACOB

    Eden Naby

    (1873-1967) Assyrian pastor and relief worker. In Urmia, from 1904 to 1918, he assisted Dr. William Shedd (1865-1918) in teaching and administering Maʿrefat, an American school for boys from all ethnic groups. From 1918 to 1921 Jacob David served as superintendent of the refugee schools and the Near East Relief Orphanage in Tabriz.

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  • DAWĀ

    Cross-Reference

    See DRUGS.

  • DAʿWA

    Cross-Reference

    “mission,” a term used already by the ʿAbbasids but especially associated with the Ismaʿilis. See DAʿĪ .

  • DAWĀMĪ, ʿABD-ALLĀH

    DĀRYŪŠ ṢAFVAT

    (b. Ṭā near Tafreš, 1891; d. Tehran, 10 January 1981), a master of classical Persian vocal music with a perfect command of the radīf (repertoire), as well as a gifted player of the Persian drum (tonbak) and a virtuoso of rhythmic (żarbī) pieces and songs (taṣnīf).

  • DAWĀNUS

    Dariush Kargar

    the name of a man seen in the other world by Ardā Wirāz, as described in both the Middle Persian and the Zoroastrian Persian versions of the Ardā Wirāz-nāmag.

  • DAWĀT

    LINDA KOMAROFF

    lit. "inkwell"; a utilitarian receptacle that also served as a symbol or metaphor for the instrument of state, with a long history in Islamic Persia. Inkwells were characterized in Persian poetry and historical works from the 10th century on as symbols of royal and by extension ministerial office.

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  • DAʿWAT AL-ESLĀM

    Nassereddin Parvin

    A biweekly Persian journal published in Bombay by Ḥājj Sayyed Moḥammad Dāʿī-al-Eslām from 19 October 1906 until the end of 1909.

  • DAʿWAT-E ESLĀMĪ

    Nassereddin Parvin

    lit. "the Islamic call"; a monthly religious journal published in Kermānšāh from November-December 1927 to June 1936.

  • DAWĀTDĀR

    C. Edmund Bosworth

    lit. “keeper, bearer of [the royal] inkwell or inkstand”; title of various officials in medieval Islamic states.