H~ CAPTIONS OF ILLUSTRATIONS

list of all the figure and plate images in the letter H entries.

 

Untitled Document

H ENTRIES: CAPTIONS OF ILLUSTRATIONS

 

online entry

caption text

ḤABAQUQ, TOMB OF

Figure 1. The tomb of Ḥabaquq, after Sotuda, p. 6190.

ḤABIB EṢFAHĀNI

Figure 1. Ḥabib Eṣfahāni. Courtesy of the author.

ḤABIB-ALLĀH SĀVAJI

Figure 1. A seated courtier with his pet falcon, courtesy of The Pierpont Morgan Library, New York, MS M. 386, f. 1.

HĀDI SABZAVĀRI

Figure 1. Statue of Hādi Sabzavāri, after Amin.

HADRIAN

Figure 1. Denarius coin of Hadrian. Obverse: bust of the emperor; inscription: IMP[erator] CAESAR TRAIAN HADRIANUS AUG[ustus]. Reverse: seated goddess, identified with inscription SALAVG as Salus Augusti “Welfare of the Emperor”; inscription: PM TRP COS III (pontifex maximus, tribunitia potestas, consul tertium "chief priest, the tribunal power, consul third time”). (Courtesy of C. J. Brunner)

ḤĀʾERI, ʿABD-AL-KARIM YAZDI

Figure 1. Shaikh ʿabd-al-Karim Ḥāʾeri.

HAFEZ vi. Printed Editions of the Divān of Hafez

Figure 1. Frontispiece of a lithograph edition of Hafez’s Divān, ed. Moḥammad Qodsi Ḥosayni, Bombay, 1322/1904.

HAFEZ xii. Hafez and the Visual Arts 

Plate I. Garden scene, Paris, Bibliothèque nationale, Mss. or Suppl. Persan 1425, fol. 19b, after Richard, p. 86.

HAFEZ xii. Hafez and the Visual Arts 

Plate II. Cast brass jug (mašraba) made by Ḥabib-Allāh b. ʿAli Bahārjāni, Khorasan, 866/1461-61, London, Victoria and Albert Museum, no. 943-1886, after Melikian-Chirvani, p. 249.

HAFEZ xii. Hafez and the Visual Arts 

Plate III. Celebration of ʿid, by Sultan Moḥammad, Tabriz, ca. 1527, after Soudavar, p. 160.

HAFEZ xii. Hafez and the Visual Arts 

Plate IV. Celebrants at a tavern, Paris, Mss. or Suppl. Persan 1477, Hafiz, Divan, fol. 40, after Richard, p. 196.

HAFEZ xiii. - xiv. Hafez’s Tomb (Ḥāfeẓiya)

Plate I. Ḥāfeẓiya in the early 20th century, after Jackson, p. 332.

HAFEZ xiii. - xiv. Hafez’s Tomb (Ḥāfeẓiya)

Plate II. Ḥāfeẓiya in the late 20th century, from Shiraz University website www.shirazu.ac.ir.

ḤĀFEẒ EṢFAHĀNI

Plate I. A schematic representation of Ḥāfeẓ Eṣfahāni’s clock.

HAFT KEŠVAR

Plate I. The world according to the Avesta (adapted from M. Boyce, Textual Sources for the Study of Zoroastrianism, Glasgow, 1984, p. 17).

HAFT KEŠVAR

Plate II. The Seven Regions according to late Sāsānian and early Islamic scholastic views (adapted from Bīrūnī, Tafhim).

HAFT KEŠVAR

Plate III. The Seven Climes (early Islamic adaptation of the Ptolemaic view).

HAFT KEŠVAR

Plate IV. The world according to early Islamic scientists (after Bīrūnī, Tafhim, pp. 166-70).

HAFT SIN

Figure 1. An illustration of Haft Sin, after Batmanglij, p. 385.

HAFT TEPE

Plate I. Map of southwestern Iran.

HAFT TEPE

Plate II. Plan of Royal Tomb of Tepti-ahar, Haft Tepe.

HAFT TEPE

Plate III. Map of excavated area, Haft Tepe.

HAFT TEPE

Plate IV. Diagram of the double purpose kiln, Haft Tepe.

HAIFA

Plate I. Shrine of the Bab overlooking the Persian Garden.

ḤĀJI FIRUZ

Figure 1. Stylized drawing of Ḥāji Firuz, after Radio Peyk, “Haji Firooz: The Herald of the New Year,” www.swix.ch/peyk.

ḤĀJI PIRZĀDA

Figure 1. Ḥāji Pirzāda.

ḤĀJI VĀŠANGTON

Figure 1. Ḥāji Vāšangton.

HAJIABAD I. Inscriptions

Figure 1. Drawing of the Ḥājiābād inscription published by Robert Ker Porter (I, pl. 15, opp. p. 513).

ḤĀJJ SAYYĀḤ

Plate I. Ḥājj Sayyāḥ in Paris, after Hajj Sayyah, 1998, p. 125.

ḤĀJJ SAYYĀḤ

Plate II. Ḥājj Sayyāḥ in prison, after Hajj Sayyah, 1998, p. 14.

HAJJI BABA OF ISPAHAN

Plate I. Hajji Baba utilizes his skills as a barber to please a military chief. After 2d ed., London, 1835, title page.

HAJJI BABA OF ISPAHAN

Plate II. Hajji Baba converses with the royal physician, Mirza Ahmak. After 2d ed., London, 1835, title page.

HAJJI BABA OF ISPAHAN

Plate III. Morier’s sketch of Mirza Firouz, the Persian emissary. After A Persian at the Court of King George, 1809-10, tr. and ed. Margaret Morris Cloake, London, 1988, plate 17.

HAJJI BABA OF ISPAHAN

Plate IV. Morier’s sketch of the grand vizier, “a little old man.” (This is most likely a caricature of Fatḥ-ʿAli Shah’s premier, Mirzā Šafiʿ Māzandarāni.) After A Persian at the Court of King George, 1809-10, tr. and ed. Margaret Morris Cloake, London, 1988, plate 23.

HAJJI BABA OF ISPAHAN

Plate V. Hajji Baba enjoys the company of Zeenab. After Ḥabl al-matin, Persian tr., Calcutta, 1905, opp. p. 142.

HAJJI BABA OF ISPAHAN

Plate VI. The royal physician demonstrates the ineffectiveness of European medicine before the shah and his court. After Ḥabl al-matin, Persian tr., Calcutta, 1905, opp. p. 124.

ḤAKIMI, EBRĀHIM

Figure 1. Ebrāhim Ḥakimi.

ḤAKIMOVA, MAWJUDA

Figure 1. Mawjuda Ḥakimova in the 1970s. (Davronov, 1989, p. 123).

ḤALABI, MAḤMUD

Figure 1. Photograph of Shaikh Maḥmud Ḥalabi.

ḤĀLAT, ABU’L-QĀSEM

Figure 1. Abu’l-Qāsem Ḥālat.

ḤALLĀJ, ABU’L-MOḠIṮ ḤOSAYN

Plate I. The martyrdom of Ḥallāj in Baghdad. A 17th century Indian painting (Allahabad 1017a), from Diwān, by Amir Najm-al-Din Dehlavi. Courtesy of The Walters Art Museum, Baltimore, w.650p.22v.

HAMADĀN i. Geography

Figure 1. The Province of Hamadān, based on Sāzmān-e naqšabardāri-e kešvar, Aṭlas-e melli-e Irān, Tehran, 1994; and Markaz-e āmār-e Irān, Farhang-e ābādihā-ye kešvar XXII, Tehran, 1970.

HAMADĀN iv. Urban Plan

Figure 1. Aerial view of Hamadān. Courtesy of Abdolhamid Eshragh.

HAMADĀN v - vi. History, Islamic Period

Plate I. Distant view of Hamadān and Mount Alvand in early 20th century, after Jackson, opposite p. 145.

HAMADĀN v - vi. History, Islamic Period

Plate II. Bridge over the river at Hamadān, Alvand in the background, after Jackson, opposite, p. 165

HAMADĀN vii. Monuments

Plate I. Ganj-nāma. Courtesy of Elm Art and Cultural Group.

HAMADĀN vii. Monuments

Plate II. Šir-e sangi. Courtesy of Elm Art and Cultural Group.

HAMADĀN vii. Monuments

Plate III. Gonbad-e ʿAlawiān. Courtesy of Elm Art and Cultural Group.

HAMADĀN vii. Monuments

Plate IV. Mausoleum of Avicenna. Courtesy of Elm Art and Cultural Group.

HAMADĀN vii. Monuments

Plate V. Mausoleum of Bābā Ṭāher. Courtesy of Elm Art and Cultural Group.

HAMADĀN vii. Monuments

Plate VI. Congregational Mosque. Courtesy of Elm Art and Cultural Group.

HAMADĀN viii. Jewish Community

Plate II. Torah from Mausoleum of Esther and Mordechai. (Courtesy of the author.)

HAMADĀN viii. Jewish Community

Plate I. Mausoleum of Esther and Mordechai, courtesy of Elm Art & Cultural Group.

HAMADĀNIĀN FACTORIES AND ENDOWMENTS

Figure 1. Illustrations of ʿAli Hamadāniān (left) and Ḥosayn Hamadāniān (right). Courtesy of the ICC website.

HAMADĀNIĀN FACTORIES AND ENDOWMENTS

Figure 2. The cement factory in its early years.

HAMADĀNIĀN FACTORIES AND ENDOWMENTS

Figure 3. Sepahan Cement Factory.

ḤAMIDI ŠIRĀZI

Figure 1. Mehdi Ḥamidi Širāzi.

HARP

Figure 1. Arched harps on Persian seal impressions (second millennium B.C.E.). (caption too long)

HARP

Figure 2. Robust, vertical, angular harps (first millennia B.C.E. and C.E.). a. Extant Egyptian harp, 1000-500 B.C.E. (Musée du Louvre, Paris).  (caption too long)

HARP

Figure 3. Horizontal, angular harps. a. Terracotta plaque, Iščāli (Mesopotamia), 1900-1500 B.C.E. (Rashid, 1984, Pl. 71). b. Terracotta figurine, Susa, 1900-1500 B.C.E. (Spycket, 1992a, Pl. 95, no. 803). c. Silver plate, Persia, 8th-10th century C.E. (Farmer, 1966, Pl. 6).

HARP

Figure 4. Light, vertical, angular harps. a. Wall relief, Ṭāq-e Bostān (Persia), ca. 600 C.E. (Fukai et al., 1972, Pl. LIXb). b. Shōsōin Treasure Depository, Nara (Japan), extant specimen, eighth century C.E. (Hayashi et al., 1967, a composite of Pls. 93-99, 106-7).

HARP

Figure 5. Robust vertical harps (second millennium B.C.E.). a. Terracotta plaque, Babylon, 1900-1500 (Rashid, 1984, Pl. 62). b. Terracotta figurine, Babylon, 1900-1500 (Rashid, 1984, Pl. 70). c. Terracotta figurine, Susa, 1900-1500 (Spycket, 1992a, Pl. 96, no. 813).

HARP

Figure 6. Elamite (Persian) angular harps (first millennium B.C.E.).

HARP

Figure 7. Harps illustrated in Persian miniature manuscripts produced in various workshops during the Islamic period. Dates are given in C.E.

ḤASANLU TEPPE i. The Site

Figure 1. Provisional plan of the structures of Ḥasanlu IVB within the period IIIB fortification wall.

ḤASANLU TEPPE i. The Site

Figure 2. Overview of Ḥasanlu. Used by permission of the University of Pennsylvania Museum, Philadelphia.

ḤASANLU TEPPE i. The Site

Figure 3. Ḥasanlu period IV B drawing of Horse breastplate of bronze found with a mess of horse gear. L 42.28 HT 20.2 cms. HAS 74-241. Iran Bastan Museum, Tehran.

ḤASANLU TEPPE ii. The Golden Bowl

Figure 1. Ḥasanlu Silver Beaker from period IV B. Electrum overlay. HT 17.0 cm. HAS 58-427. Iran Bastan Museum, Tehran.

ḤĀŠEM, RAḤIM

Figure 1. Photograph of Raḥim Ḥāšem.

ḤASIBI, KĀẒEM

Figure 1. Kāẓem Ḥasibi.

HAŠTRUDI, MOḤSEN

Figure 1. Moḥsen Haštrudi.

ḤĀTAMI, ʿALI

Figure 1. Photograph of  ʿali Ḥātami.

HAUG, MARTIN

Figure 1. Martin Haug.

ḤAYDAR KHAN ʿAMU-OḠLI

Figure 1. Ḥaydar Khan ʿamu-Oḡli.

HĀYEDA

Figure 1. Hāyeda (MaʿṢuma Dadebāl).

HAŽĀR

Figure 1. Hažār (ʿAbd-Al-Raḥmān Šarafkandi).

HAZĀRA i. Historical geography of Hazārajāt

Figure 1. Map of Afghanistan with Hazāragi-speaking areas. Adapted from Mousavi, 1998, p. 68.

HAZĀRA ii. HISTORY

Figure 1. A procession of Ḥezb-e Waḥdat forces in Bāmiān during the celebration of the 7th anniversary of the formation of their party, 4 August 1996.

HAZĀRA ii. HISTORY

Figure 2. Hazāra migrant workers in Tehran sharing a meal.

HAZĀRA ii. HISTORY

Figure 3. Hazāra migrant workers in Quetta, playing a board game during a stopover on their journey to Iran.

HAZĀRA ii. HISTORY

Figure 4. The giant Buddha which used to stand in Bāmiān, 22 July 1996.

HAZĀRA ii. HISTORY

Figure 5. A decorated stage in preparation for the celebration of the 7th anniversary of the formation of Ḥezb-e Waḥdat, 1 August 1996.

HAZĀRA ii. HISTORY

Figure 6. Hazāra migrant workers in Kandahar, October 1995.

HAZĀRA ii. HISTORY

Figure 7. A typical shop in the Hazārajāt, October 1995.

HAŽIR, ʿABD-AL-ḤOSAYN

Figure 1. ʿAbd-Al-Ḥosayn Hažir.

HEDĀYAT, MOḴBER-AL-SALṬANA i. Life and Work

Figure 1. Mehdiqoli Hedāyat, Moḵber-al-Salṭana.

HEDAYAT, SADEQ i. Life and Work

Figure 1. Sadeq Hedayat.

HEDAYAT, SADEQ v. Hedayat in India

Figure 1. The Summer Queen in recent times, as apartment house: (a) south side with entrance on Arthur Bunder, (b) interior, elevator. (Courtesy of the author)

HEDAYAT, SADEQ v. Hedayat in India

Figure 2. The Summer Queen: east side, facing B K Boman Behram Marg. (Courtesy of the author)

HEDAYAT, SADEQ v. Hedayat in India

Figure 3. The Summer Queen: signage showing division into apartments.(Courtesy of the author)

HEDGEHOG

Figure 1. Long-eared hedgehog (Hemiechinus auritus). By permission of E. Firouz (The Complete Fauna of Iran, London and New York, 2005, p. 49).

HEDIN, SVEN

Figure 1. Photograph of Sven Hedin.

ḤEJĀZI, MOḤAMMAD MOṬIʿ-AL-DAWLA

Figure 1. Moḥammad Ḥejāzi, Moṭiʿ-Al-Dawla.

HEKMAT, REŻĀ SARDĀR FĀḴER

Figure 1. Reżā Sardār Fāḵer Ḥekmat.

HEKMAT, ŠAMSI MORĀDPUR

Figure 1. Šamsi Morādpur Ḥekmat.

HEKMAT, ʿALI-AṢḠAR

Figure 1. ʿAli-Aṣḡar Ḥekmat.

HELIOCLES I

Figure 1. Silver coin of Heliocles I. Obverse: bust of the king. Reverse: standing figure of Zeus; inscription: [B](A)SILEŌS DIKAIOU ELIOKLEOUS “of the just King Heliocles” (B. V. Head, Historia Numorum. A Manual of Greek Numismatics, Oxford, 2nd ed., Oxford, 1911 pp. 839-40, fig. 370).

HELLENISM

Figure 1. A gold (wt. 132 gr.) and a silver (tetradrachm, 262 gr.) coin of Lysimachus, king in Thrace and part of Asia Minor (r. 305-281 BCE). Obv.: profile head of Alexander with ram's horn as the divine son of the syncretic deity Zeus-Ammon; rev.: Pallas Athene holding Victory; inscription BASILEŌS LUSIMAXOU (B. V. Head, A Guide to the Principal Gold and Silver Coins of the Ancients, from circ. B. C. 70 to A. D. 1, London, 1881, p. 63, nos. IV B 19-20, pl. 31).

HELMET i. In Pre-Islamic Iran

Figures 1-33. Pre-Islamic helmets.

HELMET i. In Pre-Islamic Iran

Figures 34-58. Pre-Islamic helmets.

HENNING, WALTER BRUNO

Figure 1. Photograph of Walter Bruno Henning.

HERACLES

Figure 1. Heracles, after Wilhelm Binder, ed., Dr. Vollmer’s Wörterbuch der Mythologie aller Völker, 3rd ed., Stuttgart, 1874.

HERAT iv. Topography and Urbanism

Figure 1. Topographical landmarks of Timurid Herat (after Allen 1981, Map 2).

HERAUS

Figure 1. Obol of Heraus. Scale: 4:1 (Ashmolean Museum, Oxford).

HERAUS

Figure 1. Tetradrachm of Heraus. Scale: 1:1 (State Museum, Lucknow).

HERBERT, THOMAS (2)

Figure 1. Portrait of Thomas Herbert.

HERMES

Figure 1. A depiction of Hermes.

HERMITAGE MUSEUM i. Collection of the Pre-Islamic Period

Figure 1. Bronze finial for a votive standard, Luristan, 8th-7th centuries B.C.E. (courtesy of The State Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, Russia; after V. G. Lukonin, Iskusstvo drevnego Irana, Moscow, 1977, p. 47).

HERMITAGE MUSEUM i. Collection of the Pre-Islamic Period

Figure 2. Detail, gold griffin with inlay, 4th century B.C.E. (courtesy of The State Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, Russia; after V. G. Lukonin, Iskusstvo drevnego Irana, Moscow, 1977, p. 84).

HERMITAGE MUSEUM i. Collection of the Pre-Islamic Period

Figure 3. Ceramic vase with green glaze, Susa, 2nd-3rd centuries C.E. (courtesy of The State Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, Russia; after V. G. Lukonin, Iskusstvo drevnego Irana, Moscow, 1977, p. 134).

HERMITAGE MUSEUM i. Collection of the Pre-Islamic Period

Figure 4. Carnelian stamp seal of “Xusraw the mage,” 4th century C.E. (courtesy of The State Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, Russia; after V. G. Lukonin, Iskusstvo drevnego Irana, Moscow, 1977, p. 154).

HERMITAGE MUSEUM i. Collection of the Pre-Islamic Period

Figure 5. Gilded silver dish, 6th century C.E. Courtesy of The State Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, Russia (after V. G. Lukonin, Iskusstvo drevnego Irana, Moscow, 1977, p. 195).

HERMITAGE MUSEUM i. Collection of the Pre-Islamic Period

Figure 6. Drawing of the Pazyryk Carpet; after K. Jettmar, Art of the Steppes, Art of the World, New York, 1964, fig. 103, p. 121.

HERMITAGE MUSEUM ii. Collection of the Islamic Period

Plate I. Figure of a horse, 10th century. Bronze/brass, height 36 cm, length 42 cm. Courtesy of The State Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, no. IR-1984 (after Piotrovsky and Vrieze, plate 113).

HERMITAGE MUSEUM ii. Collection of the Islamic Period

Plate II. Ewer, 12th-early 13th century. Bronze/brass, silver, height 36.5 cm. Courtesy of The State Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, no. IR-1468 (after Piotrovsky and Vrieze, plate 118).

HERMITAGE MUSEUM ii. Collection of the Islamic Period

Plate III. Water jug, early 13th century. Bronze, silver, height 35 cm. Courtesy of The State Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, no. AZ-225 (after Piotrovsky and Vrieze, plate 119).

HERMITAGE MUSEUM ii. Collection of the Islamic Period

Plate IV. Eight tiles, early 14th century. Faience, each tile height 15 cm, width 15 cm. Courtesy of The State Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, no. IR-1291-1298 (after Piotrovsky and Vrieze, plate 158A).

HERMITAGE MUSEUM ii. Collection of the Islamic Period

Plate IX. Book rest, 17th century. Wood, paint finish, height 58 cm, width 20 cm. Courtesy of The State Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, no. VR-184 (after Piotrovsky and Vrieze, plate 302).

HERMITAGE MUSEUM ii. Collection of the Islamic Period

Plate V. Dervish’s kaškul, 19th century. Faience, glaze-painted with blue, brown and black paint, height 12 cm, length 22.5 cm. Courtesy of The State Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, no. VT-2707 (after Piotrovsky and Vrieze, plate 76).

HERMITAGE MUSEUM ii. Collection of the Islamic Period

Plate VI. Feast in the Open Air, by Reżā ʿAbbāsi, early 17th century. Two miniatures, both enclosed in a yellow frame and backed on pink card; paper, gouache, gold, left half 26.2x16.5 cm. Courtesy of The State Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, no. VR-740/XVIII (after Piotrovsky and Vrieze, plate 89).

HERMITAGE MUSEUM ii. Collection of the Islamic Period

Plate VII. Dagger with sheath, early 17th century. Steel, gold, enamel, precious stones, emerald, length 42.8 cm. Courtesy of The State Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, no. OR-448 (after Piotrovsky and Vrieze, plate 287).

HERMITAGE MUSEUM ii. Collection of the Islamic Period

Plate VIII. Reservoir for a water pipe (qaliān), 19th century. Gold, enamel, height 20.2 cm. Courtesy of The State Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, no. VZ-296 (after Piotrovsky and Vrieze, plate 295).

HERMITAGE MUSEUM ii. Collection of the Islamic Period

Plate X. Small table, 19th century. Wood, paint finish, on three legs with a round top, diameter of top 52.5 cm, height 77 cm. Courtesy of The State Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, no. VR-1281 (after Piotrovsky and Vrieze, plate 307).

HERON-ALLEN, EDWARD

Figure 1. Photograph of Edward Heron-Allen.

HERTEL, JOHANNES

Figure 1. Johannes Hertel.

HERZFELD, ERNST

Figure 1. Photograph of Ernst Herzfeld, 1928.

ḤESĀBI, MAḤMUD

Figure 1. Maḥmud Ḥesābi.

HILL, GEORGE FRANCIS

Figure 1. Photograph of George Francis Hill.

HINZ, (A.) WALTHER

Figure 1. Photograph of (A.) Walther Hinz.

ḤIRA

Figure 1. The region of Ḥira in the late Sasanian era, ca. 600 A.D.

HOFFMANN, KARL

Figure 1. Photograph of Karl Hoffmann.

HOLDICH, THOMAS HUNGERFORD

Figure 1. Colonel Sir Thomas Hungerford Holdich.

HORMOZD KUŠĀNŠĀH

Figure 1. Dinar of Hormozd I Kušānšāh. The British Museum. (Photograph: Courtesy of Trustees of the British Museum)

HORMOZD KUŠĀNŠĀH

Figure 2. Drachm of Hormozd I Kušānšāh. The British Museum. (Photograph: Courtesy of Trustees of the British Museum)

HORMOZI, SAʿID

Figure 1. Saʿid Hormozi.

HORMUZ ii. ISLAMIC PERIOD

Figure 1. Map of the Strait of Hormuz, adapted from Map of Islamic Republic of Iran, scale 1: 1,6000,000. Courtesy of the Gitashenasi Geographical and Cartographic Institute, Tehran, 2002.

HORSESHOES

Figure 1. Types of Persian horseshoes and horseshoe nails.

HORSESHOES

Figure 2. Types of European horseshoes.

HORUFISM

Figure 1. The verse reads: “Adam is the tablet in which is inscribed the existence of the world; the generosity of God (fażl-e ḥaqq: i.e., Fażl-Allāh Astarābādi) is written on Adam’s face.” After Atalay, facing p. 36.

ḤOSAYN B. ʿALI iii. The Passion of Ḥosayn

Figure 1. Šemr, the arch villain in a processional taʿzia, Mehriz, 1977.

ḤOSAYN B. ʿALI iii. The Passion of Ḥosayn

Figure 2. Parda-ye taʿzia, representing the tragedy of Karbalā.

ḤOSAYN B. ʿALI iii. The Passion of Ḥosayn

Figure 3. ʿĀšurā, oil painting by Muḥammad Modabber, 1960s.

ḤOSAYN B. ʿALI iii. The Passion of Ḥosayn

Figure 4. Taʿzia, “Bāzār-e Šām,” Takiya-ye Moʿāwen-al-Molk, Kermānšāh, 1999.

ḤOSAYN B. ʿALI iii. The Passion of Ḥosayn

Figure 5. A Moḥarram penitent, after B. Vereschquine, Voyage dans les Provinces de Caucase, Paris, 1869.

ḤOSAYN B. ʿALI iii. The Passion of Ḥosayn

Figure 6. A tile panel illustrating self-flagellation, Takiya-ye Moʿāwen-al-Molk, Kermānšāh.

ḤOSAYNQOLI, ĀQĀ

Figure 1. Āqā Ḥosaynqoli. After Ḵāleqi, first ed., I, p. 131.

HOSSEIN, ANDRÉ

Figure 1. Photograph of André Aminollah Hossein.

HOSSEINI, MANSOUREH

Figure 1. Photograph of Mansoureh Hosseini. (Pakbaz et al. p. 100)

HOSSEINI, MANSOUREH

Figure 2. Mansoureh Hosseini in the Forbidden City, Beijing, China, 1999. (Pakbaz, et al., p. 26)

HOSSEINI, MANSOUREH

Figure 3. Ali, c. 1959, Gouache on cardboard, 94.5 × 72 cm. Artist’s collection. (Pakbaz et al. p. 67).

HOSSEINI, MANSOUREH

Figure 4. One of the works displayed at the club of the National Iranian Oil Company, Tehran, 1960 (Pakbaz et al., p. 82).

HOSSEINI, MANSOUREH

Figure 5. Black Chrysanthemums, circa 1986, Oil on board, 98.5 × 69 cm. Collection of Tehran Museum of Contemporary Art (Pakbaz et al. p. 38).

HOSSEINI, MANSOUREH

Figure 6. Concerto, 1964, Oil on canvas, 180 × 90cm. Artist’s collection (Pakbaz et al., p. 62).

HOSSEINI, MANSOUREH

Figure 7. An-al Haqq, circa 1978, Oil on canvas, 190×190 cm. Artist’s collection (Pakbaz et al., p. 41).

HOUTUM-SCHINDLER, ALBERT

Figure 1. Sir Albert Houtum-Schindler.

HOVEYDA, AMIR-ABBAS

Figure 1. Amir ʿAbbās Hoveydā.

HÜBSCHMANN, (JOHANN) HEINRICH

Figure 1. (Johann) Heinrich Hübschmann, after Tayean, p. 471.

HUMORALISM

Figure 1. Schematic representation of the four humors: their relationship to the seasons, elements, temperaments, and organs; and the characterization of each by two of the four primary qualities.

HUNNIC COINAGE

Plate I. Examples of the Hunnic Coin Series. a. Kidāra (?) after ca. 384/85 C.E. Dinar (7.69 g), obv. and rev. Kabul (?) (Bibliothèque nationale de France).  (caption is WAY too long)

HUŠYĀR ŠIRĀZI

Figure 1. Hušyār Širāzi.

HUTH, GEORG

Figure 1. Illustration of Georg Huth (“Juedische Dozenten an der Berliner Universität,” 1910, cols. 747-48).

HUVIŠKA

Figure 1. Tamgha on the coins of Huviška..

HUVIŠKA

Plate I. a. Gold stater of Huviška, 19 mm, 7.74 gm. Obverse: royal portrait (earlier version) and Bactrian inscription. Reverse: the god OHŠO (= Śiva) and tamgha device. Courtesy Peter A. Linenthal Collection. b. Gold stater of Huviška, 21 mm, 7.91 gm. Obverse: royal portrait (later version) and Bactrian inscription. Reverse: the goddess APDOXŠO and tamgha device. Courtesy Peter A. Linenthal Collection.

HYDERABAD

Plate I. Čahār Menār, 1590-91, Hyderabad, India. Courtesy of the author.

HYDERABAD

Plate II. Mecca Masjed, begun 1617, with additions in the 17th and 18th centuries, Hyderabad, India. Courtesy of the author..

HYENA

Figure 1. Hyaena Hyaena. By permission of E. Firouz (A Guide to the Fauna of Iran, Tehran, 2000, p. 366).

 

 

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Last Updated: August 11, 2015