G~ CAPTIONS OF ILLUSTRATIONS

list of all the figure and plate images in the letter G entries.

 

G ENTRIES: CAPTIONS OF ILLUSTRATIONS

 

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GABAIN, ANNEMARIE VON

Figure 1. Photograph of Annemarie von Gabain.

GABBA

Plate I. Gabba, southwestern Persia(?), 19th century. Wool pile on wool warp and weft. 208.5 × 129.5 cm. The Textile Museum R33.00.4. Acquired by George Hewitt Myers.

GABBA

Plate II. Gabbas on display at a Qašqāʾī tent in the garmsīr. After M. Aḥmadī and M. Maḵmalbāf, Gabba: fīlm-nāma wa ʿaks, Tehran, 1375 Š./1996.

GABBA

Plate III. A gabba in a contemporary style. After M. Aḥmadī and M. Maḵmalbāf, Gabba: fīlm-nāma wa ʿaks, Tehran, 1375 Š./1996.

GABRIELI, FRANCESCO

Figure 1. Photograph of  Francesco Gabrieli. After Traini, ed.

GAČ-BORĪ

Plate I. Carved stucco hood in the meḥrāb of the Friday mosque at Nāʾīn. 10th century. Photograph by S. Blair.

GAČ-BORĪ

Plate II. Moqarnas vault of moulded stucco in the tomb of ʿAbd-al-Ṣamad at Naṭanz, 1307. Photograph by S. Blair.

GAČ-BORĪ

Plate III. Pierced stucco vaults in the so-called “music room” of the ʿĀlī Qāpū palace, Isfahan. Early 17th century. Photograph by S. Blair.

ḠAFFĀRĪ, ḠOLĀM-ḤOSAYN KHAN

Figure 1. Painting of Ḡolām-Ḥosayn Khan Ḡaffārī by Moṣawwer-al-Mamālek (1919). Courtesy of F. Gaffary.

ḠAFFĀRĪ, MOḤAMMAD-EBRĀHĪM KHAN

Figure 1. Moḥammad-Ebrāhīm Khan Ḡaffārī. After M. Sepehr, Īrān dar jang-e bozorg, Tehran, 1336 Š./1957, p. 96.

ḠAFFĀRĪ, NEẒĀM-AL-DĪN

Figure 1. Neẓām-al-Dīn Ḡaffārī. After Sepehr, p. 172.

GAFUROV, BOBODZHAN GAFUROVICH

Figure 1. Photograph of Bobodzhan Gafurovich Gafurov.

ḠALYĀN

Plate I. Body (tana) and immersion pipe (mīlāb) of a ḡalyān. After Semsār, p. 23.

ḠALYĀN

Plate II. Various types of sarpūš (top bowls) used with ḡalyāns for holding charcoal and tobacco. The model decorated with the portrait of Nāṣer-al-Dīn Shah has been particularly popular. After Semsār, p. 23.

ḠALYĀN

Plate III. Enameled ḡalyān with coconut-shaped reservoir (kūza) in the collection of the Crown Jewels of Persia. Height: 37 cm. After Meen and Tushingham.

ḠALYĀN

Plate IV. Unusual ḡalyāns with very long pipes. Safavid period. After Chardin, Pl. XIX.

ḠALYĀN

Plate V. Persians smoking ḡalyāns at a coffeehouse. Safavid period. After Tavernier.

ḠALYĀN

Plate VI. Woman with ordinary ḡalyān in the private apartments of a Persian house. After H. Grothe, Wanderungen in Persien, Berlin, 1910, facing p. 260.

GANDOM

Figure 1. Wheat production in Persia by ostān, 1973.

GANDOM

Figure 2. Wheat production in Persia by ostān, 1992.

GANDOM

Figure 3. Geographical distribution of wheat production in Afghanistan by province, 1983.

GANDOM

Figure 4. Wheat production in Afghanistan by province, 1983.

ḠANĪ, QĀSEM

Figure 1. Photograph of  Qāsem Ḡanī.

GANJAʾĪ, REŻĀ

Figure 1. Photograph of Reżā Ganjaʾī.

GARDANE MISSION

Figure 1. Claude Mathieu de Gardane, envoy to Tehran (December 1807-February 1809). Courtesy of Le Souvenir Napoléonien.

GARDEN ii. Islamic Period

Figure 1. Laškarī Bāzār, plan of the Garden Courtyard with Square Pavilion. Ghaznavid period. After Schlumberger, 1978.

GARDEN ii. Islamic Period

Figure 2. Laškarī Bāzār, plan of the Square Pavilion in the Garden Courtyard. Ghaznavid period. After Schlumberger, 1978.

GARDEN ii. Islamic Period

Figure 3. Layout of a čahārbāḡ according to the Eršād al-zerāʿa (q.v.) by Qāsem b. Yūsof, 921/1515. Reconstruction by M. E. Subtelny; drawing by W. Moskaliuk, after Stud. Ir., 1995.

GARDEN ii. Islamic Period

Figure 4. Plan of the Bāḡ-e Fīn, Kāšān, founded by Shah ʿAbbās but rebuilt by Fatḥ-ʿAlī Shah, as it appeared in the late 19th century (after Wilber, 1979).

GARDEN ii. Islamic Period

Plate I. The “Namakdān” decagonal pavilion at Gazorgāh (Herāt), probably Safavid. Photograph by L. Golombek, 1966

GARDEN ii. Islamic Period

Plate II. Drawing of the Hašt Behešt pavilion, Isfahan, built in the late 17th century. Drawing by P. Coste, 1867.

GARDEN iii. Influence of Persian Gardens in India

Figure 5. Plan of the Shalamar Garden. After Sikander.

GARDEN iii. Influence of Persian Gardens in India

Plate III. Shalamar Garden. Central canal of the public garden. Photograph by H. Crane.

GARDEN iii. Influence of Persian Gardens in India

Plate IV. Shalamar Garden. Central pool and marble pavilions. Photograph by H. Crane.

GARDEN vi. In Persian Art

Plate V. For the decorative arts, the “garden carpet” is the quintessential re-creation of the garden, while paintings depict the garden as a setting for events. Vegetal motifs as ornament may be understood as generic allusions to the garden. In special circumstances, these allusions may be viewed as allusions to paradise themes.

GARDEN vi. In Persian Art

Plate VI. Garden scene with pool, from a manuscript of Neẓāmī’s Ḵamsa, ca. 1420. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Gift of Alexander Smith Cochran, 1913. (13.228.13)

GASTEIGER, ALBERT JOSEPH

Figure 1. Albert Joseph Gasteiger. Bilderarchiv der Österr. Nationalbibliothek, NB 518.583. After Slaby, Pl. 7.

GAUGAMELA

Figure 1. The Battle of Gaugamela, depicted in the Alexander Mosaic from the House of the Faun, Pompeii. Museo Archeologico Nazionale Napoli. Photograph licensed under the GFDL by the author of the photograph; released under the GNU Free Documentation License. (See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Alexandermosaic.jpg.)

GĀVBĀZĪ

Plate I. Gāvbāzī in Gīlān in the early 19th century. After Rabino, 1914.

GĀVBĀZĪ

Plate II. Varzā jang in the central plain of Gīlān in 1993. Photograph by C. Bromberger.

GĀVBĀZĪ

Plate III. Palang, the gāvbāzī champion in 1365-66 Š./1986-87. Photograph by M. Ajiri, courtesy of C. Bromberger.

GAZ (1) i. Gaz-Angobīn

Plate I. Astragalus adscendens Boiss and Haussk, Leguminosae. Photograph by B. Grami, September 1979.

GAZ (1) i. Gaz-Angobīn

Plate II. Gaz plants at the foot of the Ḵᵛānsār hills. Gaz gatherers can be seen in the background. Photograph by B. Grami, September 1979.

GAZ (1) i. Gaz-Angobīn

Plate III. Gaz gatherers with their tools at the foot of the Ḵᵛānsār hills. Photograph by B. Grami, September 1979.

GAZ (1) i. Gaz-Angobīn

Plate IV. Gathering gaz: tapping the plant and collecting gaz in the leather bowl. Photograph by B. Grami, September 1979.

ḠAZNĪ ii. Monuments and Inscriptions

Figure 1. Site and monuments of Ḡaznī. After Ball, II, p. 24, fig. 24.1.

ḠAZNĪ ii. Monuments and Inscriptions

Plate I. Minaret of Masʿūd III at Ḡaznī. After Survey of Persian Art VIII, p. 356.

ḠAZNĪ ii. Monuments and Inscriptions

Plate II. Cursive inscription on tomb of Maḥmūd I. Photograph by U. Scerrato, Istituto Italiano per l’Africa e l’Oriente, Dep. CS Neg. R 2152/8.

GEIGER, BERNHARD

Figure 1. Bernhard Geiger (third from bottom) at the centenary banquet tendered to the American Oriental Society, Copley-Plaza Hotel, Boston, 9 April 1942. Photograph by Fay-Foto, Boston; courtesy of R. N. Frye.

GEIGER, WILHELM

Figure 1. Wilhelm Geiger. After W. Wüst, ed., Studia Indo-Iranica: Ehrengabe für Wilhelm Geiger, Leipzig, 1931.

GELDNER, KARL FRIEDRICH

Figure 1. Karl Friedrich Geldner. After W. Rau, Bilder hundert deutscher Indologen, Wiesbaden, 1965, p. 53.

GELPKE, RUDOLF

Figure 1. Photograph of Rudolf Gelpke.

GEMCUTTING

Figure 1. Schematic representation of a grinding wheel.

GENDARMERIE

Figure 1. Hjalmar O. Hjalmarson (center) and officers of the Gendarmerie. After M. Sepehr, Īrān dar jang-e bozorg, Tehran, 1336 Š./1957, p. 106.

GENOA

Plate I. Portrait of a Mongol khan in the Tractatus de septem vitiis, one of the earliest known examples of a European imitation of a Persian miniature. Genoa, 14th century. MS London, British Library, Add. 27695, fol. 13. By permission of the British Library.

GEOGRAPHY iii. Political geography

Figure 1. Boundaries and provincial administrative divisions of the Islamic Republic of Iran (1995). After United Nations Department of Public Information, Cartographic Section, map no. 3891.

GEOGRAPHY iii. Political geography

Figure 2. The formation of the Afghan state. (a) Territorial divisions of the Pashtuns. (b) Borders of the Afghan state 1762-72 and its international boundaries today. After Planhol, 1993, p. 608, fig. 46.

GEOGRAPHY iii. Political geography

Figure 3. Evolution of administrative divisions of Afghanistan. (a) Divisions in 1946. (b) Divisions to 1964. (c) Divisions after 1964. (d) Divisions in 1982. After Planhol, 1993, p. 630, fig. 47.

GEOGRAPHY iv. Cartography of Persia

Figure 1. Map of the area between the Zagros Mountains and the hills of Karkūk as represented on a Babylonian clay tablet containing the world’s oldest known topographical map.

GEOGRAPHY iv. Cartography of Persia

Figure 2. The inhabited world reconstructed from Strabo (64 B.C. E.-21 C.E.). After Bunbury, II, p. 238.

GEOGRAPHY iv. Cartography of Persia

Plate I. The “Fifth Map of Asia” (Quinta Asiae Tabula). After Ptolemy, Geographia, ed. L. Holle, Ulm, 1482.

GEOGRAPHY iv. Cartography of Persia

Plate II. Eṣṭaḵrī’s map of the “Persian Sea.” MS Istanbul, Topkapı Sarayĭ Kütüphanesi. After Y. Kamal, Monumenta Cartographica Africae et Agypti, Cairo, 1932.

GEOGRAPHY iv. Cartography of Persia

Plate III. Map of the world in Zakarīyāʾ Qazvīnī’s Āṯār al-belād. After Kamal (1926-51).

GEOGRAPHY iv. Cartography of Persia

Plate IV. Map-drawing of Ardabil by Pieter van der Aa, 1719.

GEOGRAPHY iv. Cartography of Persia

Plate V. “The Kingdom of Persia.” Map by John Speed in his atlas, The Prospect of the Most Famous Parts of the World 1627.

GEOGRAPHY iv. Cartography of Persia

Plate VI. The first official map of Tehran, prepared for Amīr Kabīr by August Křziž in 1857. 92 × 76 cm; scale 1:2,880.

GEOLOGY

Figure 1. Geological structural zones of Persia.

GEOLOGY

Figure 2. Distribution of mineral resources in Persia.

GEORGIA i. The land and the people

Figure 1. Modern Georgia. After United Nations Department of Public Information, Cartographic Division, map no. 3180 Rev. 2.

GEORGIA ii. History of Iranian-Georgian Relations

Figure 2. Georgia in the 16th century. After K. Salia, History of the Georgian Nation , Paris, 1983, p. 253.

GEORGIA iii. Iranian elements in Georgian art and archeology

Figure 3. Location of ancient Georgia (Colchis and Iberia). After Braund, p. xviii, map 1.

GEORGIA iii. Iranian elements in Georgian art and archeology

Figure 4. Schematic map of Georgia showing principal archaeological sites. After Kacharava, p. 79, fig. 1.

GEORGIA iii. Iranian elements in Georgian art and archeology

Figure 5a. Achaemenid objects in Colchis: gold cheek-plate with a depiction of Ahura Mazdā (Sairkhe). Adapted from Nadiradze, Table V, 3.

GEORGIA iii. Iranian elements in Georgian art and archeology

Figure 5b. Achaemenid objects in Colchis: silver rhyton Mtisdziri, environs of Vani. Adapted from Gamkrelidze, fig. 21.

GEORGIA iii. Iranian elements in Georgian art and archeology

Figure 5c. Jugs with tubular handles. After Mikeladze, 1990, Table XV.

GEORGIA iii. Iranian elements in Georgian art and archeology

Figure 6a. Achaemenid silver phiale from Colchis. Vani. Adapted from Vani IV, figs. 199, 202.

GEORGIA iii. Iranian elements in Georgian art and archeology

Figure 6b. Achaemenid silver phiale from Colchis. Environs of Dioscuria. After Kvirkvelia, p. 81, fig. 21.

GEORGIA iii. Iranian elements in Georgian art and archeology

Figure 6c. Achaemenid glass phiale from Colchis. Sairkhe. After Nadiradze, Table XXXVIII, 1.

GEORGIA iii. Iranian elements in Georgian art and archeology

Figure 7a. Architectural remains from Colchis (Sairkhe): Doric capital. After Kipiani, Tables X.1.

GEORGIA iii. Iranian elements in Georgian art and archeology

Figure 7b. Architectural remains from Colchis (Sairkhe): bull-protome. After Kipiani, Table IX.2.

GEORGIA iii. Iranian elements in Georgian art and archeology

Figure 8a. Architectural remains from Iberia: Tsikhiagora. After Kapiani, Table II, 2.

GEORGIA iii. Iranian elements in Georgian art and archeology

Figure 8b. Architectural remains from Iberia: Dedoplis Mindori. After Kapiani, Table XXXIX.

GEORGIA iii. Iranian elements in Georgian art and archeology

Figure 8c. Architectural remains from Iberia: plan of temple complex from Dedoplis Mindori. After Gagoshidze, 1992, p. 30, fig. 1.

GEORGIA iii. Iranian elements in Georgian art and archeology

Figure 8d. Architectural remains from Iberia: reconstruction of column in Nadarbazevi, Mtskheta. After Lezhava, Table LIX, 5.

GEORGIA iii. Iranian elements in Georgian art and archeology

Figure 9a. Material from Samadlo: red painting on pythos. After Gagoshidze, 1981, Table XVII.

GEORGIA iii. Iranian elements in Georgian art and archeology

Figure 9b. Material from Samadlo: limestone reliefs of hunting scene. After Gagoshidze, 1981, Table XIX, 236.

GEORGIA iii. Iranian elements in Georgian art and archeology

Figure 10. Iberian pottery of the 6th-1st centuries B.C.E. Adapted from Narimanishvili, passim, and Gagoshidze, 1981, passim.

GEORGIA iii. Iranian elements in Georgian art and archeology

Figure 11a. Iberian pottery of the 6th-1st centuries B.C.E. Adapted from Narimanishvili, passim, and Gagoshidze, 1981, passim.

GEORGIA iii. Iranian elements in Georgian art and archeology

Figure 11b. Iberian pottery of the 6th-1st centuries B.C.E. Adapted from Narimanishvili, passim, and Gagoshidze, 1981, passim.

GEORGIA iii. Iranian elements in Georgian art and archeology

Figure 12. Bone plates engraved with hunting scenes and Aramaic inscriptions. From Dedoplis Mindori. After Gagoshidze, 1992, p. 42, fig. 13.

GEORGIA iv. Literary contacts with Persia

Plate I. Rostevan and Avtandil hunting. From the Vepkhistqaosani. MS Tbilisi, Kekelidze Institute of Manuscripts, Academy of Sciences, S. 5006, fol. 16r.

GEORGIA iv. Literary contacts with Persia

Plate II. Vis meets the nurse. From the Visramiani. MS Tbilisi, Kekelidze Institute of Manuscripts, Academy of Sciences, S. 3702, fol. 19v.

GEREH-SĀZĪ i. Woodwork

Plate I. Ceiling of the Čehel Sotūn, Isfahan. Photograph by S. Blair.

GEREH-SĀZĪ i. Architecture

Plate II. Carved stucco panel on the entrance of Rebāṭ-e Māhī. 12th century. Photograph by M. Milwright.

GEREH-SĀZĪ i. Architecture

Plate III. Carved terracotta tile decoration in the Masjed-e Jāmeʿ, Gonābād. 14th century. Photograph by M. Milwright.

GEREH-SĀZĪ i. Architecture

Plate IV. Cut tile revetment. Gonbād-e Sabz, Mašhad. 1082/1671. Photograph by M. Milwright.

GEREH-SĀZĪ i. Architecture

Plate Va. Mawj-e čahār lenga bā qofl-e lā elāh ellā Allāh wa yā Moḥammad yā ʿAlī.

GEREH-SĀZĪ i. Architecture

Plate Vb. Mūrd-e haft rangī-e zanjīra-ye do baḵšī.

GEREH-SĀZĪ i. Architecture

Plate Vc. Hašt-čahār lenga-ye morabbaʿ.

GEREH-SĀZĪ i. Architecture

Plate Vd. Šeš morabbaʿ.

GERMANY ii. Archeological excavations and studies

Plate I. Taḵt-e Solaymān. Site of Sasanian fire temple (5th-7th century C.E.) and Mongol palace (13th century). Photograph courtesy of Deutsches Archäologisches Institut, Berlin.

GERMANY ii. Archeological excavations and studies

Plate II. View of Besṭām (Azerbaijan), site of an Urartian hill fortress excavated by German archeologists from 1969 onwards (see EIr. IV, pp. 175-77). Photograph courtesy of Deutsches Archäologisches Institut, Berlin.

GERMANY vi. Collections and Study of Persian Art in Germany

Plate III. Bowl with lute-player and Arabic benediction in Kufic script on the edge. Silver and niello. Iran, 10th-11th century. Courtesy of Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Preussischer Kulturbesitz, Museum für Islamische Kunst (Inventory no. I.582). 5-77). Photograph courtesy of Deutsches Archäologisches Institut, Berlin.

GERMANY vi. Collections and Study of Persian Art in Germany

Plate IV. Glazed ceramic meḥrāb with arabesque reliefs and Koranic inscriptions in Kufic and naskò scripts. Kāšān. Dated Ṣafar 623 (February-March 1226) and signed by Ḥasan b. ʿArabšāh. Courtesy of the Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Preussischer Kulturbesitz, Museum für Islamische Kunst (Inventory no. I. 5366).

GERMANY viii. German Cultural Influence In Persia

Plate V. The German School (Madrasa-ye ālmānī) in Tehran After H. Grothe, Wanderungen in Persien, Berlin, 1910, facing p. 272.

GERMANY viii. German Cultural Influence In Persia

Plate VI. Classroom and students at the German School (Madrasa-ye ālmānī) in Tehran After H. Grothe, Wanderungen in Persien, Berlin, 1910, facing p. 272.

GHILAIN, Antoine

Figure 1. Photograph of Antoine Ghilain.

GHIRSHMAN, ROMAN

Figure 1. Photograph of Roman Ghirshman.

GĪĀʾĪ, ḤAYDAR

Figure 1. Heydar Ghiaï-Chamlou (photograph courtesy of Yves Ghiaï-Chamlou).

GĪĀʾĪ, ḤAYDAR

Plate I. Dome of the Majles-e Senā (Senate) in Tehran, designed by Gīāʾī and Forūḡī.

GĪLĀN i. Geography and Ethnography

Figure 1. The province of Gīlān.

GĪLĀN i. Geography and Ethnography

Figure 2. Administrative divisions of Gīlān.

GĪLĀN iii. Archeology

Figure 3. The Safīdrūd valley, Gīlān province.

GĪLĀN iii. Archeology

Figure 4. Gowharrūd Valley showing location and topography of Marlik Tepe.

GĪLĀN iii. Archeology

Plate I. View of Marlik Tepe and its environs. (Photograph courtesy of E. O. Negahban.)

GĪLĀN iii. Archeology

Plate II. Pitcher with long spout. Gray pottery. Height: 25 cm. Mūza-ye Īrān Bāstān (Mūza-ye Mellī). (Photograph courtesy of E. O. Negahban.)

GĪLĀN iii. Archeology

Plate III. Gold bowl with winged bulls. Height: 18 cm. Mūza-ye Īrān Bāstān. (Photograph courtesy of E. O. Negahban.)

GĪLĀN iii. Archeology

Plate IV. Gold bowl with griffins and winged bulls. Height: 19 cm. Mūza-ye Īrān Bāstān. (Photograph courtesy of E. O. Negahban.)

GĪLĀN iii. Archeology

Plate V. Gold beaker with unicorns. Height: 17.5 cm. Mūza-ye Īrān Bāstān. (Photograph courtesy of E. O. Negahban.)

GĪLĀN iii. Archeology

Plate VI. Female pottery figurine holding spouted vessel to chest. Height: 37.5 cm. Mūza-ye Īrān Bāstān. (Photograph courtesy of E. O. Negahban.)

GĪLĀN iii. Archeology

Plate VII. Hollow gold bust of king. Height: 11.7 cm. Mūza-ye Īrān Bāstān. (Photograph courtesy of E. O. Negahban.)

GĪLĀN iii. Archeology

Plate VIII. Figurine of humped bull with gold earrings. Red pottery. Height 23 cm. Mūza-ye Īrān Bāstān. (Photograph courtesy of E. O. Negahban.)

GĪLĀN iii. Archeology

Plate IX. Bronze model of oxen with yoke and plow. Length: 20 cm. Mūza-ye Īrān Bāstān. (Photograph courtesy of E. O. Negahban.)

GĪLĀN iii. Archeology

Plate X. Gold pendant with granulated cage. Height: 3.8 cm. Mūza-ye Īrān Bāstān. (Photograph courtesy of E. O. Negahban.)

GĪLĀN iii. Archeology

Plate XI. Necklace of gold pomegranates and red carnelian beads. Length: 25 cm. Mūza-ye Īrān Bāstān. (Photograph courtesy of E. O. Negahban.)

GĪLĀN vii. History in the 19th century

Figure 5. Gilān in the early modern period (after Rabino, 1917, p. 488). Map generated using ArcView GIS software. Data sources: Digital Chart of the World, 1993, and ArcWorld 1:3m, 1992, ESRI, Inc. (topographical data not available for all locations).

GĪLĀN ix. Monuments

Plate XII. Detail of the wooden sarcophagus in the first chamber of the Čahār Pādšāhān shrine in Lāhījān (#19). After Sotūda, II, plate 75.

GĪLĀN ix. Monuments

Plate XIII. Antique faience tiles on the dado of the ayvān of the Čahār Pādšāhān shrine (#19). After Sotūda, II, plate 84.

GĪLĀN ix. Monuments

Plate XIV. Mural in the shrine of Āqā Sayyed Moḥammad int the village of Pīnčā in Āstāna (#23) illustrating the Prophet’s ascension (meʿrāj) to heaven. After Sotūda, II, plate 149.

GĪLĀN ix. Monuments

Plate XV. Detail of the wooden sarcophagus in Zanjīr Āstāna, the shrine of Sayyed ʿAlī Ḡaznavī at the village of Tajen Gūka in Lāhījān (#26). After Sotūda, II, plate 136.

GĪLĀN ix. Monuments

Plate XVI. The shrine of ʿAwn b. Moḥammad in Māsūla (#36). After Sotūda, I, plate 61.

GĪLĀN ix. Monuments

Plate XVII. Mural in the shrine of Bābā Walī in Deylamān (#39) illustrating the Prophet’s ascension. After Sotūda, II, plate 20.

GĪLĀN ix. Monuments

Plate XVIII. The interior of Ṣafī/Šahīdīya Mosque in Rašt (#44). After Sotūda, I, plate 173.

GĪLĀN ix. Monuments

Plate XIX. Pyramidal roof of the tomb of of Shaikh Tāj-al-Dīn Zāhed Gīlānī at Šayḵānavar (#64). After Sotūda, II, plate 123.

GĪLĀN ix. Monuments

Plate XX. Murals illustrating religious scenes; the shrine of Āqā Sayyed Ḥosayn and Āqā Sayyed Ebrāhīm at Foškālī Maḥalla in Langarūd (#70). After Sotūda, II, plate 167.

GĪLĀN ix. Monuments

Plate XXI. he wooden lattice transenna in the shrine of Āqā Mīr Šahīd at the Ordūbāzār quarter of Lāhījān (#79). After Sotūda, II, plate 55.

GĪLĀN ix. Monuments

Plate XXII. The pulpit and the prayer niche in Akbarīya Mosque, Lāhījān (#82). After Sotūda, II, plate 70.

GILĀN xi. Irrigation

Figure 1. Property holder cleaning a length of canal proportional to the size of his rice field. Sefidrud delta area, April 2000, courtesy of the author.

GILĀN xi. Irrigation

Figure 2a. Harrowing the rice field before transplanting, witha board drawn by a horse. Sefidrud delta area, May 1993, courtesy of the author.

GILĀN xi. Irrigation

Figure 2b. Transplanting.

GILĀN xi. Irrigation

Figure 3. The thickness of water reaches 10 cm over the course of plant growth. Sarāvān area, June 2003, courtesy of the author.

GILĀN xi. Irrigation

Figure 4. The rice field has been drained before weeding. Sefidrud delta area, June 1996, courtesy of the author.

GILĀN xii. Rural Housing

Figure 1. Types of barns.

GILĀN xii. Rural Housing

Figure 2. Two examples of domestic enclosures in the Gilān plain.

GILĀN xii. Rural Housing

Figure 3. Types of roofs.

GILĀN xii. Rural Housing

Figure 4. A rich farmer’s house with two tālārs in Sadeh (the inner plain of central Gilān).

GILĀN xii. Rural Housing

Figure 5. Formal and semantic organization of the house.

GILĀN xii. Rural Housing

Figure 6. House in Deylamān, 1972.

GILĀN xii. Rural Housing

Map 1. House foundations and bases. The black symbols indicate various ways of raising the house above the ground.

GILĀN xii. Rural Housing

Map 2. Distribution of the main types of house walls. Log walls are always covered with daub in the plain, never in the alpine meadows (summer chalets).

GILĀN xii. Rural Housing

Map 3. Distribution of roof types and covering materials.

GILĀN xii. Rural Housing

Map 4: Distribution of the main types of rice barns and different methods of drying rice.

GILĀN xii. Rural Housing

Plate I. Silkworm nursery (telembār) in the Langarud district, spring 1996. Courtesy of the author.

GILĀN xii. Rural Housing

Plate II. House in the northern Rašt district with a hipped roof and two tālārs, 1974. Courtesy of the author.

GILĀN xii. Rural Housing

Plate III. A two-story house with a pointed roof in the Safidrud delta, 1974. Courtesy of the author.

GILĀN xii. Rural Housing

Plate IV. House from central plain, February 1974. Courtesy of the author.

GILĀN xii. Rural Housing

Plate V. Winter house of herdsmen in southern Ṭāleš, the upper floor of which is reserved for the livestock which reach it by a logged ramp, 1974. Courtesy of the author.

GILĀN xii. Rural Housing

Plate VI. Pārgā, shepherd’s abode in southern Ṭāleš, winter 1974. Courtesy of the author.

GILĀN xii. Rural Housing

Plate VII. Rough-logged, shingle covered summer cabin in southern Ṭāleš, summer 1972. Courtesy of the author.

GILĀN xii. Rural Housing

Plate VIII. Houses with flat roofs in Kelišom, a southern district of Gilān, summer 1972. Courtesy of the author.

GILĀN xiii. Kinship and Marriage

Figure 1 Enclosure with several households in a village of Gilān central plain (1982).

GILĀN xiii. Kinship and Marriage

Plate I. ʿAqd, Gilān plain, spring 2000 (courtesy of the author)

GILĀN xiii. Kinship and Marriage

Plate IIa. Marriage, Gilān plain, spring 1996 (courtesy of the author).

GILĀN xiii. Kinship and Marriage

Plate IIb. Marriage, Tāleš, autumn 2007 (courtesy of the author).

GILĀN xiii. Kinship and Marriage

Plate III. Hanābandon, Gilān 2000 (courtesy of the author).

GILAN xvi. FOLKLORE

Plate I 1. Cradle in a house in Sarāvān, January 1991 (courtesy of the author).

GILAN xvi. FOLKLORE

Plate II. Cemetery located in front of the mosque and equidistant from the two main hamlets, Laskukālaye, Safidrud delta, April 1996 (courtesy of the author).

GILAN xvi. Folklore

Plate III. Tomb of a šahid (martyr) of the Iran-Iraq War, Laskukālaye, Safidrud delta, April 1996 (courtesy of the author).

GILAN xvi. Folklore

Plate IV. Mourning ceremony on the haftom (seventh day after death), Amiranda, Āstāna area, March 2000 (courtesy of the author).

GILAN xvi. Folklore

Plate V. A sofra with the haft sin and local specialties (nun-e berenji, etc.) in Lelevejesar, Caspsian shore, close to Kiāšahr, March 1997 (courtesy of the author).

GILAN xvi. Folklore

Plate VI. A band of strolling players of taʿzia, Fuman area, June 2003 (courtesy of the author).

GILAN xvi. Folklore

Plate VII. Processions of groups of penitents in Āstāna during ʿAšurā, 1974 (courtesy of the author).

GILAN xvi. Folklore

Plate VIII. Crossing the pol-e ṣerāṭ on the back of a goat, Lāhijān area, April 2000 (courtesy of the author).

GILAN xvi. Folklore

Plate IX. To chase away the evil eye, eggshells are placed on branches in the garden, Laskukālaye, Safidrud delta, April 2002 (courtesy of the author).

GILAN xvi. Folklore

Plate X. Aštak, Gilān central plain, April 2000 (courtesy of the author).

GILAN xvi. Folklore

Plate XI. Lafenbāzi, Damašk, Gilān mountains, June 2008 (courtesy of the author).

GILAN xvi. Folklore

Plate XII. Košti gila-mardi, Āstāna area, July 2007 (courtesy of the author).

GILAN xvii. Gender Relations

Plate I. Dobara, Gilan plain, 1996 (courtesy of the author).

GILAN xvii. Gender Relations

Plate II. Man and woman preparing the ground of the nursery, Gilan plain, 1993 (courtesy of the author).

GILAN xvii. Gender Relations

Plate III. Feeding silkworms with mulberry leaves, Gilan plain, 1996 (courtesy of the author).

GILAN xvii. Gender Relations

Plate IV. Men milking goats in Gerdesāya, Ṭāleš mountains, 1972 (courtesy of the author).

GILAN xvii. Gender Relations

Plate V. Men gathering around a haštak game, Gilan plain, 2000 (courtesy of the author).

GILAN xviii. Rural Production Techniques

Figure 1. Spade. a: ḵelik, celā(b)ru: (1) dasta, (2) tiqa. b: ḵelik, cela(b)ru: (1) dasta, (2) tiqa. c: gerbāz: (1) dasta, (2) pācu, (3) tiqa. (Courtesy of the author)

GILAN xviii. Rural Production Techniques

Figure 2. Billhook. a: dās. b: dās of Gāleš shepherds: (1) dasta, (2) tiqa. (Courtesy of the author)

GILAN xviii. Rural Production Techniques

Figure 3. Sickle: dāra. (Courtesy of the author)

GILAN xviii. Rural Production Techniques

Figure 4. Drying paddy by suspending the sheaves over beams: (1) ḵārek, (2) ḵārekču, (3) darz (sheaf). (Courtesy of the author)

GILAN xviii. Rural Production Techniques

Figure 5. Structure of a pointed roof with four equal sides. (Courtesy of the author)

GILAN xviii. Rural Production Techniques

Figure 6. An ard from Tāleš (kāvol): (l) moštak, (2) šuna, (3) āfandārāfan, (5) razdār, (6) pišāzan. (Courtesy of the author)

GILAN xviii. Rural Production Techniques

Figure 7. An ard from the Rašt area (kāvol): (l) moštaka, (2) šāna, (3) kulusa, galšu, (4) āhansa, āhansar, (5) rāstadār, (6) pišāzan. (Courtesy of the author)

GILAN xviii. Rural Production Techniques

Figure 8. An ard from the delta area (gājema): (1) mušta, moštak, (2) šāna, (3) kunusa, galvāč, (4) āhansat, āhinsar, (5) rāstadār, sartawl, tāval, (6) lāfansar, katāvsar. (Courtesy of the author)

GILAN xviii. Rural Production Techniques

Figure 9. Types of plowing in the rice fields. a1: aškel, porkani, šoḵm. a2: dobāra, dokula, vākār. a3: urān, sekār, kār-a-kun. (Courtesy of the author)

GILAN xviii. Rural Production Techniques

Figure 10. A Tāleši ard ḵiš: ): (1) oskolan, (2) pišāzan čub, (3) gāvāhan, (4) rāštdār, lat. (Courtesy of the author)

GILAN xviii. Rural Production Techniques

Figure 11. Yokes from the Gilan plain. a: single-ox, wooden yoke (lap, jat). b: single-horse, fabric yoke. (Courtesy of the author)

GILAN xviii. Rural Production Techniques

Figure 12. Double-bow yoke (Deylamān): (1) jet, (2) samaču. (Courtesy of the author)

GILAN xviii. Rural Production Techniques

Figure 13. Harrow (piškāvol, lot): (1) maštaka, mošteka, moštaka, (2) šuna, šāna, (3) piškāvol. (Courtesy of the author)

GILAN xviii. Rural Production Techniques

Figure 14. Hand harow (tanda, darmārda) used to complete the leveling operation. (Courtesy of the author)

GILAN xviii. Rural Production Techniques

Figure 15. Storehouse (kuruj, telembār, Rašt area): (1) kulasakat, (2) sarsakat, (3) ajār, lattice of branches placed in front of the entry, (4) sar, roof. (Courtesy of the author)

GILAN xviii. Rural Production Techniques

Figure 16. Storehouse (kanduj, delta area): (1) ḵāk and cine, foundation of daub and stone, (2) rit, small beams, (3) tāḵte, board, (4) linga, post, (5) par, rat guard made from a wooden dish, (6) lār, (7) vāšan, (8) paracub. (Courtesy of the author)

GILAN xviii. Rural Production Techniques

Figure 17. Raised storehouse (kanduj, eastern plain): (1) ḵāk and cine, foundation of daub and stone, (2) lang, post, (3) kula, (4) sutun, (5) zigāl, (6) sar, roof. (Courtesy of the author)

GILAN xviii. Rural Production Techniques

Figure 18. Flails. (Courtesy of the author)

GILAN xviii. Rural Production Techniques

Figure 19. Ard (gādār) used in the Deylamān and Rudbār areas: (1) mošte, (2) culat, lat, (3) lat, latu, (4) gājemedār, gādār, (5) pišazen, (6) pilak kili, (7) kucekili. (Courtesy of the author)

GILAN xviii. Rural Production Techniques

Figure 20. Pressing crushed olives between two planks (divarku). (Courtesy of the author)

GILAN xviii. Rural Production Techniques

Figure 21. Oil-pressing machine (dastgāh-e roḡan keši): (1) balagerd, (2) bālak, (3) lafan, (4) taram, (5) dastelat, (6) angoštak, iron hinge joining the two dastelats, (7) dastelat, (8) žāmen, (9) katreki, (10) pilaču, (11) kisa, containing the crushed olives. (Courtesy of the author)

GILAN xviii. Rural Production Techniques

Figure 22. Crushing the olives with a revolving vertical millstone (dastgāh-e piči): (1) čub, (2) sang-e piči, (3) jāl. (Courtesy of the author)

GILAN xviii. Rural Production Techniques

Plate I. Keeping one’s balance when feeding the silkworms with branches of mulberry trees, Langarud area, 1996. (Courtesy of the author)

GILAN xviii. Rural Production Techniques

Plate II. An old form lying on a kura (brazier) used to dry tealeaves, Lāhijān area, 1996. (Courtesy of the author)

GILAN xviii. Rural Production Techniques

Plate III. Harrowing the rice field with a (piškāvol), Safidrud delta area, 2000. (Courtesy of the author)

GILAN xviii. Rural Production Techniques

Plate IV. Covering the seed grain with branches of elder tree, Safidrud delta area, 2000. (Courtesy of the author)

GILAN xviii. Rural Production Techniques

Plate V. Transplanting (nešā) the seedlings, Amlaš area, 1993. (Courtesy of the author)

GILAN xviii. Rural Production Techniques

Plate VI. Two oxen, joined by a collar yoke, threshing the harvest, Deylamān area, 1972. (Courtesy of the author)

GILĀN xx. Handicrafts

Figure 1. Loom (caption too long)

GILĀN xx. Handicrafts

Figure 2. Loom (southern Ṭāleš)

GILĀN xx. Handicrafts

Figure 3. Treadle loom with two rows of heddles for weaving šāl (Southern Tâlesh). Courtesy of the author.

GILĀN xx. Handicrafts

Figure 4. A mat loom. (Courtesy of the author)

GILĀN xx. Handicrafts

Figure 5a. A kiln, central Ṭāleš. (Courtesy of the author)

GILĀN xx. Handicrafts

Figure 5b. Upright kiln at Gildeh and Ḵortum: 1. ātešḵāne, firebox; 2. kure, chamber; 3. dudkeš, flue; 4. darb, opening into the chamber. (Courtesy of the author)

GILĀN xx. Handicrafts

Figure 5c. Tunnel-shaped kiln: 1. dudkeš, flue; 2. kure, chamber; 3. zanburi, tuyere; 4. ojāq, firebox. Courtesy of the author. Drawings after T. Achouri.

GILĀN xx. Handicrafts

Figure 6. Potter’s wheel at villages near Siāhkal: 1. sarčaḵ, turntable; 2. mil, axle; 3. tabag, flywheel. (Courtesy of the author)

GILĀN xx. Handicrafts

Plate I. Loom (pāčāl) with treadles; see also Figure 1. (Courtesy of the author)

GILĀN xx. Handicrafts

Plate II. Čādoršab fabric. (Courtesy of the author)

GILĀN xx. Handicrafts

Plate III. Embroidery over the applied design. (Courtesy of the author)

GILĀN xx. Handicrafts

Plate IV. Weaving rush mats. (Courtesy of the author)

GILĀN xx. Handicrafts

Plate V. Bringing produce to market in large bskets (zanbil) on a pole (čān ču). (Courtesy of the author)

GILĀN xx. Handicrafts

Plate VI. Pottery workshops using a potter’s wheel. (Courtesy of the author)

GILĀN xxi. Cooking

Plate I. The bazaar of Rasht, 1993. Rice, dried seeds, fresh vegetables, olives, etc.: the basic dishes in Gilān are quite varied. (Courtesy of the author)

GILĀN xxi. Cooking

Plate II. Preparing rešte ḵoškār, the bazaar of Rasht, 1996. (Courtesy of the author)

GILĀN xxi. Cooking

Plate III. A meal in an urban family, Rasht, 1996: fFish, kate, olives, etc. (Courtesy of the author)

GILĀN xxi. Cooking

Plate IV. Meal of sizdah be-dar, Safidrud delta, 2000. (Courtesy of the author)

GILCHRIST, JOHN BORTHWICK

Figure 1. John Borthwick Gilchrist (1759-1841). Bronze medal (diameter 57 mm) by Carl Friedrich Voigt, 1872-74. (Courtesy of the National Portrait Gallery, London, NPG 4064, CC-BY-NC-ND).

GIV, ROSTAM

Figure 1. Arbāb Rostam and Marvārīd Ḵānom Giv. After Payk-e kankāš no. 2, 1369 Š./1990.

GIVA

Plate I. Gīva. Photograph by J. Sadaqat-Kish.

GIVA

Plate II. Special needle and thread used for making giva. Photograph by J. Sadaqat-Kish.

GIVA

Plate III. Triangular cap (piš-panja) for reinforcing the upper tip of the giva. Photograph by J. Sadaqat-Kish.

GIVA

Plate IV. Giva with reinforced tips. Photograph by J. Sadaqat-Kish.

GLACIERS

Figure 1. Hypothetical limits of snowline in Persia. After Schweizer, 1970.

GLASS

Plate I. Glass bowl with facet-cut decoration. Persia, 6th-7th century. Courtesy of Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Preussischer Kulturbesitz, Museum für Islamische Kunst.

GLASS

Plate II. Ewer with cut decoration. Persia, 9th - 10th century. Courtesy of Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Preussischer Kulturbesitz, Museum für Islamische Kunst.

GLASS

Plate III. Two glass jugs. Persia, 19th century. Courtesy of Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Preussischer Kulturbesitz, Museum für Islamische Kunst.

GOBINEAU, JOSEPH ARTHUR DE

Plate I. Contemporary painting by Ṣaniʿ-al-Molk showing (left to right) Mirzā ʿAbbās Khan, undersecretary of foreign affairs; Lagowski, Russian chargé d’affaires; Comte de Gobineau; Ḥaydar Effendi, Ottoman chargé d’affaires; Mirzā Saʿid Khan, minister of foreign affairs. From the former home of Ḵᵛāja-nuri; after Gobineau, Lettres Persanes, ed. Duff, frontispiece.

GÖBL, ROBERT

Figure 1. Photograph of Robert Göbl.

GOL ḴĀNĀN MORDA

Figure 1. General view of the graveyard.

GOL ḴĀNĀN MORDA

Figure 2. Selection of burial goods: pottery and bronze axe-adze, shield and tubular supports.

GOL O BOLBOL ii. As a Decorative Theme in Persian Art

Plate I. Silk painting with Persian motif. 

GOL O BOLBOL ii. As a Decorative Theme in Persian Art

Plate II. Textile fragment with rose bushes and birds. Persia, first half of the 17th century. Metal-ground silk, twill weave. 26 x 20.125 in. The Brooklyn Museum of Art, 38.1. Purchased with funds from the A. A. Healy Fund.

GOL O BOLBOL ii. As a Decorative Theme in Persian Art

Plate III. Octagonal mirror-case. ʿAli-Ašraf (active 1730s-1780s); signed, “after Moḥammad, ʿAli is the noblest.” Persia, probably Shiraz, dated 1165/1751. Opaque watercolor, crushed metallic pigment, and gold on lacquered pasteboard. The Brooklyn Museum of Art, 88.92. Gift of Mrs. Charles K. Wilkinson in memory of her husband.

GOL O BOLBOL ii. As a Decorative Theme in Persian Art

Plate IV. Qajar-period painting of a rose.

GOL O BOLBOL ii. As a Decorative Theme in Persian Art

Plate V. Mirror-case. Loṭf-ʿAli Širāzi (active 1802-71), signed “work of the most humble and lowly Loṭf-ʿAli.” Persia, probably Tehran, dated 1262/1845. Opaque watercolor, gilt pigment, crushed metallic pigment, and leather detailing on lacquered pasteboard, mirrored interior. 7.625 x 6.25 in. (front), 7.5 x 5.75 in. (inside). The Brooklyn Museum of Art, 36.940. Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Frederic B. Pratt.

GOL-GOLĀB, ḤOSAYN

Figure 1. Photograph of Ḥosayn Gol-Golāb.

ḠOLĀM-REŻĀ ḴOŠNEVIS

Plate I. A mašq or practice piece in nastaʿlīq script signed by Ḡolām-Reżā Eṣfahāni and dated 1288/1871-72. 34 x 19.7 cm. After Moraqqaʿ-e zarrīn, Tehran, 1365 Š./1986.

GOLČIN GILĀNI

Figure 1. Majd-al-Din FaḵrāʾI (Golčin Gilāni).

GOLČIN MAʿĀNI, AḤMAD

Figure 1. Aḥmad Golčin Maʿāni.

GOLD i. In Pre-Islamic Persia

Plate I. Gold bracelet with lion heads and crouching lion cubs. Ziwiye (Kurdistan), 7th century B.C.E. 2.5 inches wide × 3.625 in. diameter; 254 g. Tehran, Iran Bastan Museum.

GOLD i. In Pre-Islamic Persia

Plate II. Gold cup with three lions. Kalār Dašt (Māzandarān), 8th-7th century. B.C.E. 4.875 in. h. × 4.5 in. diameter; 238 g. Tehran, Iran Bastan Museum.

GOLD i. In Pre-Islamic Persia

Plate III. Gold bowl with name of Xerxes in trilingual inscription. Hamadān (?), 5th century B.C.E. 4.5 inches h. × 8 inches diameter; 1.407 kg. Tehran, Iran Bastan Museum.

GOLD ii. In the Islamic Period

Plate IV. . Gold bracelet. Persia, Saljuq dynasty, 11th-12th century. Gold, 10.6 cm. diameter. Courtesy of the Freer Gallery of Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C. Purchase, F1958.6.

GOLESTĀN TREATY

Figure 1. Russo-Persian frontier in the Caucasus after the Treaty of Golestān (1813).

GOLESTĀNA, ʿALI-AKBAR

Figure 1. ʿAli-Akbar Golestāna.

GOLESTĀNA, ʿALI-AKBAR

Figure 2. Page of calligraphy by ʿAli-Akbar Golestāna in šekasta-nastaʿliq script, dated 1317/1899-1900. After Honar o mardom, no. 145, 1353 Š./1974, p. 88.

GOLHĀ, BARNĀMA-YE

Figure 1. Dāwud Pirnia, artistic director of Golhā-ye javidān (1956-67). Photograph courtesy of Daryush Pirnia.

GOLPĀYAGĀNI, MOḤAMMAD-REŻĀ

Figure 1. Ayatollah Moḥammad-Reżā Golpāyagāni. After Resālat al-Qorʾān, no. 14, 1414/1993, inside cover.

GÖLPINARLI, ABDÜLBAKI

Figure 1. Abdülbaki Gölpınarlı. After Akün, p. 146.

GOLŠĀʾIĀN, ʿABBĀSQOLI

Figure 1. Abbāsqoli Golšāʾiān. Photograph courtesy of Fereydun Golšāʾian.

GOLŠĀN ALBUM

Plate I. Two camels fighting. By Kamāl-al-Din Behzād. Golšan Album. MS Tehran, Golestān Palace Library, no. 1663, fol. 6 verso. Page size 40.6 × 25.1 cm.; painting size 26 × 16.5 cm. After M.H. Semsār, p. 260.

GOLŠĀN ALBUM

Plate II. Calligraphy and marginal figures, including a self-portrait of Āqā Reżā (upper left ), dated Ramażān 1008/March-April 1600. MS Tehran, Golestān Palace Library 1663, fol. 105 recto. After Y. A. Godard, 1936, p. 14.

GOLŠIRI, HUŠANG

Figure 1. Hušang Golširi, Tehran, 1971. Courtesy of Barbara Nestor.

GOLSORḴI, ḴOSROW

Figure 1. Golsorḵi at his appeals court hearing. After Eṭṭelāʿāt 15, 1974, p. 63.

GONBAD-E QĀBUS

Figure 1. Plan of the Gonbad-e Qābus, after Ernst Diez, Churasanische Baudenkmäler, Berlin, 1918, p. 39

GONBAD-E QĀBUS

Map 1. The Sub-Province of Gonbad-e Qābus, based on Sāzmān-e Naqša-bardāri-e Kešvar, Aṭlas-e melli-e Irān, Tehran, 1373 Š./1994; and Okazaki, p. 10.

GONBAD-E QĀBUS

Plate I. View of the tomb, photo by the author.

GONBAD-E SORḴ

Figure1. The “Red Tomb” (also known as Gonbad-e Qermez), in Marāḡa, Azerbaijan.

GONDĒŠĀPUR i. The City

Figure 1. A map of Gondēšāpur (“a tentative reconstruction of the plan,” based on an aerial photograph), after Adams and Hansen, pp. 58-59.

GONDOPHARES

In-text. “Gondophares symbol” on his coinage.

GONDOPHARES

In-text. Device of Kujula Kadphises on his coinage.

GORGĀN i. Geography

Figure 1. The province of Gorgān (Golestān), based on Sāzmān-e Naqša-bardāri-e Kešvar, Aṭlas-e melli-e Irān, Tehran, 1373 Š./1994; and Okazaki, p. 10.

GORGĀN iv. Archeology

Figure 1. Aerial map of the old city of Gorgān (Jorjān), courtesy of the author.

GORGIN, IRAJ

Figure 1. Photograph of Iraj Gorgin.

GORGIN, IRAJ

Figure 2. Photograph of Iraj Gorgin.

GORGIN, IRAJ

Figure 3. Tamāšā, a socio-cultural weekly magazine, 1971-72.

GORGIN, IRAJ

Figure 4. Jacket of the audio play Šāzda kučulu.

GORGIN, IRAJ

Figure 5. Cover, Omid magazine, Los Angeles.

GORGIN, IRAJ

Figure 6. Gorgin at the international television network, KSCI.

GORGIN, IRAJ

Figure 7. Gorgin at Radio Azadi, Prague.

GORGIN, IRAJ

Figure 8. Gorgin’s gravestone in Forest Lawn Memorial Park.

GORZ

Figure 1. Rostam striking a white elephant with an ox-headed mace, from a Šāh-nāma manuscript.

GOTTHEIL, RICHARD JAMES HORATIO

Figure 1. Richard James Horatio Gottheil, courtesy of the New York Public Library.

GOWHAR-ŠĀD MOSQUE

Plate I. Ground plan of Gowhar-šād mosque (b) and the halls (c, d) connecting it to the mausoleum (a).

GOWHAR-ŠĀD MOSQUE

Plate II. Detail of the qebla ayvān with flanking minaret and mosaic faience revetment. Courtesy of Donald Wilber.

GOWHARIN, SAYYED SĀDEQ

Figure 1. Sayyed Sādeq Gowharin,

GRANTOVSKIĬ, EDVIN ARVIDOVICH

Figure 1. Edvin Arvidovich Grantovskiĭ.

GRAPHIC ARTS i. In the Qajar and Pahlavi Period

Plate I. The emblem of the official government newspaper, by Abu’l-Ḥasan Ḡaffāri.

GRAPHIC ARTS i. In the Qajar and Pahlavi Period

Plate II. The emblem of Šaraf paper with a portrait on the front page.

GRAPHIC ARTS i. In the Qajar and Pahlavi Period

Plate III. The emblem of the Trans-Iranian Railroad, by Frederick Talberg.

GRAPHIC ARTS i. In the Qajar and Pahlavi Period

Plate IV. The emblem of Moʾassasa-ye gerāfic, by Mušeḵ Sarvari.

GRAPHIC ARTS i. In the Qajar and Pahlavi Period

Plate V. lllustration of ʿAlamdār in the Ḥamla-ye ḥaydari.

GRAPHIC ARTS i. In the Qajar and Pahlavi Period

Plate VI. A poster by Mortażā Momayyez.

GRAPHIC ARTS i. In the Qajar and Pahlavi Period

Plate VII. The emblem of Reżā ʿAbbāsi Museum, by Momayyez with the cooperation of Moḥammad Eḥṣāʾi.

GRAPHIC ARTS i. In the Qajar and Pahlavi Period

Plate VIII. A page in a printed edition of the Šāh-nāma, by ʿAli-Aṣḡar Maʿsumi.

GRAPHIC ARTS i. In the Qajar and Pahlavi Period

Plate IX. A movie poster, by Faršid Meṯqāli.

GRAPHIC ARTS i. In the Qajar and Pahlavi Period

Plate X. A cartoon, by Kāmbiz Derambaḵš.

GRAPHIC ARTS ii. In the 1978-79 Revolution and Iran-Iraq War

Plate I.  Poster by Kāẓem Čalipā.

GRAPHIC ARTS ii. In the 1978-79 Revolution and Iran-Iraq War

Plate II. Revolutionary poster (Chelkowski and Dabashi, pp. 144-45).

GRAPHIC ARTS ii. In the 1978-79 Revolution and Iran-Iraq War

Plate III. Poster from the Hostage Crisis period.

GRAPHIC ARTS ii. In the 1978-79 Revolution and Iran-Iraq War

Plate IV. Anti-America poster.

GRAPHIC ARTS ii. In the 1978-79 Revolution and Iran-Iraq War

Plate V. War poster (Chelkowski and Dabashi, pp. 160-61).

GRAPHIC ARTS ii. In the 1978-79 Revolution and Iran-Iraq War

Plate VI. War poster Chelkowski and Dabashi, pp. 159).

GRAPHIC ARTS ii. In the 1978-79 Revolution and Iran-Iraq War

Plate VII. War poster (Gudarzi, pp. 172-73).

GRAPHIC ARTS ii. In the 1978-79 Revolution and Iran-Iraq War

Plate VIII. War poster (Chelkowski and Dabashi, p. 164).

GRAPHIC ARTS ii. In the 1978-79 Revolution and Iran-Iraq War

Plate IX. War poster (Chelkowski and Dabashi, p. 174).

GRAPHIC ARTS ii. In the 1978-79 Revolution and Iran-Iraq War

Plate Xa. Women's themes: postage stamp, 1985.

GRAPHIC ARTS ii. In the 1978-79 Revolution and Iran-Iraq War

Plate Xb. Women's themes: poster.

GRAPHIC ARTS ii. In the 1978-79 Revolution and Iran-Iraq War

Plate XI. Women's themes: postage stamp.

GRAPHIC ARTS ii. In the 1978-79 Revolution and Iran-Iraq War

Plate XIIa. Women's themes: school textbook.

GRAPHIC ARTS ii. In the 1978-79 Revolution and Iran-Iraq War

Plate XIIb. Women's themes: school textbook.

GRAPHIC ARTS ii. In the 1978-79 Revolution and Iran-Iraq War

Plate XIII. War billboard (Chelkowski and Dabashi, pp. 282-91).

GRAY, BASIL

Figure 1. Photograph of Basil Gray.

GRAY, LOUIS HERBERT

Figure 1. Photograph of Louis Herbert Gray.

GREAT BRITAIN xi. Persian Art Collections in Britain

Plate I. A page in the early 18th-century MS of Jāmi’s Yusof o Zolayḵā, Bodleian Library Greaves 1, fol. 140v (courtesy of the Bodleian Library, University of Oxford).

GREAT BRITAIN xi. Persian Art Collections in Britain

Plate II. Planispheric brass astrolabe, engaved and inlaid with silver, by ʿAbd-al-ʿAlī b. Moḥammad-Rafīʿ and his brother, Moḥammad-Bāqer, Šaʿbān 1124/September 1712; British Museum, OA+369. Copyright The British Museum.

GREAT BRITAIN xi. Persian Art Collections in Britain

Plate III. Noah’s ark. Rašid-al-Din Fażl-Allāh, Jāmeʿ al-tawāriḵ; Il-khanid, Tabriz, 714/1313–14; Khalili Collection, MS 727, fol. 285a (courtesy of Mr. Nasser Khalili).

GREAT BRITAIN xi. Persian Art Collections in Britain

Plate IV. A page from an anthology of divāns, copierʿAbd-al-Moʾmen ʿAlawi Kāši, Tabriz (?), Ḏu’l-qaʿda 713-Ḏu’l-qaʿda 714/February 1314–February 1315, Jonson MS132, fol. 12b, India Office Library and Records (courtesy of The India Office Libraryand Records, The British Library).

GREAT BRITAIN xiii. The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC)

Figure 1. Photograph at the Persian Service of the BBC.

GREAT BRITAIN xv. British Schools in Persia

Figure 1. Isfahan College (Adab High School). Courtesy of Hassan Dehqani-Tafti.

GREECE ii. Greco-Persian Cultural Relations

Plate I. Cylinder seal impression from Daskyleion with royal audience scene, inscribed “Artaxerxes.” Drawing by B. Mussche of Daskyleion inv. no. Erg. 55. After AMI 22, 1989, p. 147, fig. 1.

GREECE ii. Greco-Persian Cultural Relations

Plate II. Persian bracteate design used as a shield device on an Attic cup, ca. 490 B.C.E. Courtesy of the Archaeological Collection, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, inv. no. B8.

GREECE ii. Greco-Persian Cultural Relations

Plate III. Achaemenid-style incense-burner on a Clazomenaean hydria fragment, ca. 540 B.C.E. Athens National Museum 5610. After E. Pfuhl, Malerei und Zeichnung der Griechen III (Munich, 1923), fig. 147.

GREECE ii. Greco-Persian Cultural Relations

Plate IV. Horse with Persian horse trappings on a fragmentary 6th-century B.C.E. East Greek bowl. Masat Höyük inv. no. 77/105. After T. Özgüç, Masat Höyük II: A Hittite Center Northeast of Bogazköy, Ankara, 1982, pl. 64, 1b.

GREECE ii. Greco-Persian Cultural Relations

Plate V. Achaemenid style procession reliefs at Meydancikkale, 5th- or 4th-century B.C.E. Restored drawing by F. Laroche-Traunecker. After Les grands ateliers d’architecture dans le monde egéen du Ve siècle av. J.-C. (Istanbul, 1993), p. 27, fig. 7.

GREECE ii. Greco-Persian Cultural Relations

Plate VI. Attic bichrome horizontally-fluted “Achaemenid” phiale, ca. 520-500 B.C.E. Courtesy of Kassel Staatliche Museen, Inv.-Nr. T550.

GREECE ii. Greco-Persian Cultural Relations

Plate VII. Attic black-gloss “calyx cup” imitating the lobed Achaemenid deep bowl, 375-350 B.C.E. Photograph courtesy of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens: Agora Excavations, inv. no. P 16828.

GREECE ii. Greco-Persian Cultural Relations

Plate VIII. Attic black-gloss cylindrical beaker with horizontal flutes, ca. 450 B.C.E. Courtesy of Karlsruhe, Badisches Landesmuseum, inv. no. B881.

GREECE ii. Greco-Persian Cultural Relations

Plate IX. Attic black-gloss “Pheidias” mugs with petal-grooving in imitation of lobes, 450-425 B.C.E. Photograph courtesy of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens: Agora Excavations P 18288 (left) and P 10980.

GREECE ii. Greco-Persian Cultural Relations

Plate X. Procession of Priam’s gift-bearers to Greek hero Achilles on an Attic skyphos, ca. 490 B.C.E. Courtesy of Vienna Kunsthistorisches Museum, inv. no. IV 3710.

GREECE ii. Greco-Persian Cultural Relations

Plate XI. The mythical King Midas of Phrygia depicted as the Great King on an Attic stamnos, ca. 440 B.C.E. Copyright The British Museum, London, inv. no. E447.

GREECE ii. Greco-Persian Cultural Relations

Plate XII.  Griffin attacking Arimasps on an Attic pelike, 400-375 B.C.E. Courtesy of the Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg, P 1863.14 = St. 1873.

GREECE ii. Greco-Persian Cultural Relations

Plate XIII. Greek girl on the left wears both ependytes and kandys on an Attic chous, ca. 390-380 B.C.E. Courtesy ofMuseo Civico Archeologico, Bologna, PU 295.

GREECE ii. Greco-Persian Cultural Relations

Plate XIV. Seated Greek lady wears sleeved chiton, attended by fan-bearer, on an Attic lekythos, ca. 420-410 B.C.E. Paris, Musée du Louvre S 1660. Photo: M. Chuzeville. Copyright Réunion des Musées Nationaux/Art Resource, NY

GREECE ii. Greco-Persian Cultural Relations

Plate XV. Attendant bears parasol for child in Greek religious procession, on an Attic lekythos, 480-470 B.C.E. Courtesy of Paestum, Museo Archeologico Nazionale, Salerno. From Contrada di Pila.

GREECE viii. Greek Art in Central Asia, Afghanistan, and Northwest India

Plate I. Pebble mosaic in the residential quarter of the royal palace of Ay Khanum (provided by the author, courtesy of MDAFA).

GREECE viii. Greek Art in Central Asia, Afghanistan, and Northwest India

Plate II. Stone and marble statue of Aphrodite Anadyomene, from Nisa (courtesy of V. Terebenine).

GREECE viii. Greek Art in Central Asia, Afghanistan, and Northwest India

Plate III. Statue of a youth from Ay Khanum (in Bernard, CRAI, courtesy of MDAFA, R. and S. Michaud).

GREECE viii. Greek Art in Central Asia, Afghanistan, and Northwest India

Plate IV. Clay head from the temple with indented niches of Ay Khanum (courtesy of MDAFA, and R. and S. Michaud).

GREECE viii. Greek Art in Central Asia, Afghanistan, and Northwest India

Plate IX. Indo-Greek didrachm of Agathocles (after Audouin and Bernard, p. 9).

GREECE viii. Greek Art in Central Asia, Afghanistan, and Northwest India

Plate V. Coin of Demetrios (courtesy of Osmund Bopearachchi).

GREECE viii. Greek Art in Central Asia, Afghanistan, and Northwest India

Plate VI. Votive altar with Marsyas, dedicated to the River-God Oxus, from Taḵt-e sangin (courtesy of V. Terebenine).

GREECE viii. Greek Art in Central Asia, Afghanistan, and Northwest India

Plate VII. Head of a prince, from Dalíverzin Tepe(courtesy of V. Terebenine).

GREECE viii. Greek Art in Central Asia, Afghanistan, and Northwest India

Plate VIII. Head of a Saka, from Khalchayan (courtesy of V. Terebenine).

GREECE viii. Greek Art in Central Asia, Afghanistan, and Northwest India

Plate X. Kushan gold stater of Kanishka I, with Śakyamuni Buddha on the reverse. Copyright British Museum, India Office Collection 289.

GRIBOEDOV, ALEXANDER SERGEEVICH

Figure 1. Alexander Griboedov, courtesy of Bakrushin Theatre Museum in Moscow, after L. Kelly.

GRIGORIAN, MARCOS

Figure 1. Artist at his 14th St. Studio, New York City, 1962 (Grigorian, 1989, p. 17).

GRIGORIAN, MARCOS

Figure 2. Holocaust series, Twelve 6 ×10 feet murals, 1957-59 (The Gate of Auschwitz, York, 2002).

GRIGORIAN, MARCOS

Figure 3. Four Sangak Bread, 42″ × 42″, Nelson A. Rockefeller Collection, New York, 1976 (Grigorian, 1989, p. 111).

GRIGORIAN, MARCOS

Figure 4. Marcos and Vahe Grigorian, Ara and Shamiramis Uraptu, 120 × 120 cm; designed 1957, woven 1987 (Grigorian, 1999).

GRIGORIAN, MARCOS

Figure 5. Abgousht Dizy, E. Khachataurian, Paris, 27 × 28 cm, 1968 (Grigorian, 1989, p. 107).

GROUSSET, RENÉ

Figure 1. Photograph of René Grousset.

GUIDI, IGNAZIO

Figure 1. Ignazio Guidi, after Collini, p. 203.

GUIDI’S CHRONICLE

Figure 1. Beginning of “Chronicom anonymum” in Chronica Minora I, Paris, 1903, text, p. 15; tr., p. 15.

GUILLEMIN, MARCELLE

Figure 1. Marcelle Guillemin, courtesy of J. Duchesne-Guillemin.

 

 

(Cross-Reference)

Last Updated: July 29, 2015