Table of Contents

  • JAGARḴWIN

    Keith Hitchins

    (or Cegerxwin), pseudonym of Şêxmûs Hesen (1903-1984), considered by many the leading Kurdish poet of the 20th century writing in Kurmanji.

  • JAḠATU

    Nicholas Sims-Williams

    an archeological site in Ḡazni province, Afghanistan, situated about 20 km north of Ḡazni on the route between Ḡazni and Wardak.

  • JAGHATAY

    cross-reference

    See CHAGHATAYID DYNASTY.

  • JAḠMINI, MAḤMUD

    Lutz Richter-Bernburg

    b. Moḥammad b. ʿOmar  (d. 1344), an astronomer from Jaḡmin, a village in Ḵᵛārazm. The author of a brief Arabic survey of mathematical astronomy.

  • JĀḠORI

    A. Monsutti

    a term of uncertain etymological origin for both a tribal section of the Hazāras and a district (woluswāli) of Ḡazni province in Afghanistan.

  • JAHĀN TIMÜR

    Charles Melville

    recognized briefly as Il-khan in Iraq and Mesopotamia in 1339-40 during the period of the collapse of the Il-khanate.

  • JAHĀN-E ZANĀN

    Nassereddin Parvin

    (Women’s World), short-lived magazine, 1921. Published first in Mašhad (four issues) and, after a lapse of about five months, in Tehran (one issue only). 

  • JAHĀN-MALEK ḴĀTUN

    Dominic Parviz Brookshaw

    (d. after 1382), Injuid princess, poet, and contemporary of Ḥāfeẓ. The style and quality of her poetry suggest that she was acquainted with famous male contemporaries Ḥāfeẓ and ʿObayd Zākāni.

  • JAHĀNĀRĀ BEGUM

    Stephen Dale

    (1614-81), the eldest surviving daughter of the Mughal Emperor Šāh Jahān and his favorite wife, Momtāz Mahal.

  • JAHĀNBEGLU

    P. Oberling

    (or Jānbeglu), one of several Kurdish tribes transplanted from northwestern Persia to Māzandarān by Āḡā Moḥammad Khan Qajar (r. 1789-97).