Table of Contents

  • DARKE, Hubert Seymour Garland

    John Perry

    In 1961 Darke was appointed University Lecturer in Persian at Cambridge, where he taught language and literature for the next twenty years. His particular interests were Early New Persian and Persian prosody. His major research achievement was the definitive edition and translation of the Siar al-moluk, a manual of government by the celebrated Saljuq vizier Neẓām-al-Molk.

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  • DARMESTETER, JAMES

    Mary Boyce and D. N. MacKenzie

    (b. Château-Salins, Alsace, 12 March 1849, d. Paris, 19 October 1894), the great Iranist, was the son of a Jewish bookbinder, who in 1852 moved to Paris to improve his children’s educational opportunities.

  • DARRA-YE BARRA

    Remy Boucharlat

    lit. "Valley of the lamb", a locality in Fārs province, 2.5 km east-northeast of the Achaemenid royal tombs at Naqš-e Rostam. Several rock-cut monuments are scattered on steep scree and in the cliff on the north side of the valley. The most outstanding feature is the tallest fire altar so far found in Fārs.

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  • DARRA-YE NŪR

    Daniel Balland

    name of a small tributary valley on the right bank of the Konar river in eastern Afghanistan and the corresponding subdistrict of Nangrahār province.

  • DARRA-YE ṢŪF

    Daniel Balland

    name of a valley in northern Afghanistan, drained by a tributary of the right bank of the Balḵāb, and of the adjoining mountain district and its administrative center in Samangān province.

  • DARRAGAZ

    Massoud Kheirabadi, Philip Kohl

    or DARGAZ (Valley of the tamarisks), a fertile valley about 50-55 km east-west and 30-35 km north-south in the Kopet Dagh range in northern Khorasan, at about 450 m above sea level, in which are located a šahrestān (subprovince) and a town of the same name.

  • DARRAŠŪRĪ

    Pierre Oberling

    one of the five major tribes of the Qašqāʾī tribal confederation.

  • DARRŪS

    Sayyed ʿAlī Āl-e Dāwūd, JOHN CURTIS

    district in northern Tehran east of Qol-hak and south of Qayṭarīya, all former suburbs of the city; it is located about 8 km from the center of the modern city.

  • DĀRŪ

    Cross-Reference

     See DRUGS.

  • DĀRŪḠA

    Cross-Reference

    See CITIES iii.

  • DARVĀZ

    Jan-Heeren Grevemeyer

    a largely autonomous principality with territory on both sides of the upper course of the Āmū Daryā, known as the Panj, until the partition between czarist Russia and the Afghan kingdom in the last quarter of the 19th century.

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  • DARVĀZA

    Wolfram Kleiss

    (gateway), generally an entrance opening wide enough to permit passage of vehicles, in contrast to doorways, which are smaller openings to permit passage through a wall or fence. 

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  • DARVĀZA TEPE

    Linda K. Jacobs

    (or Tall-e Darvāza), a village site in the southeastern Kor river basin, in Fārs province, occupied in three stages from 1800 B.C.E. to 800 B.C.E., according to radiocarbon dates of the finds, and characterized by an essential continuity in both architecture and other aspects of material culture.

  • DARVĪŠ

    Mansour Shaki, Hamid Algar

    a poor, indigent, ascetic, and abstemious person or recluse.

  • DARVĪŠ AḤMAD QĀBEŻ

    M. E. Subtelny

    (d. 1507), Timurid vizier.

  • DARVĪŠ ʿALĪ BŪZJĀNĪ

    Cross-Reference

    See BŪZJĀNĪ.

  • DARVĪŠ ʿALĪ, AMĪR NEẒĀM-AL-DĪN KüKäLTĀŠ KETĀBDĀR

    M. E. Subtelny

    Timurid amir under Solṭān-Ḥosayn Bāyqarā (1469-1506) and younger brother of ʿAlī-Šīr Navāʾ.

  • DARVĪŠ KHAN, ḠOLĀM-ḤOSAYN

    Margaret Caton

    (b. Tehran, 1872, d. Tehran, 23 November 1926), master musician, renowned teacher, and innovative composer of Persian classical music.

  • DARVĪŠ REŻĀ

    Kathryn Babayan

    (d. 1040/1631), a qezelbāš functionary who claimed to be the awaited Mahdī.

  • DARVĪŠ, ʿABD-AL-MAJĪD ṬĀLAQĀNĪ

    Cross-Reference

    See ʿABD-AL-MAJĪD ṬĀLAQĀNĪ.