Table of Contents

  • DAQQĀQ, ABŪ ʿALĪ

    Cross-Reference

    See ABŪ ʿALĪ DAQQĀQ.

  • ḎARʿ

    cross-reference

    See WEIGHTS AND MEASURES.

  • DĀR AL- ḤARB

    Hamid Algar

    “the realm of war”; lands not under Islamic rule, a juridical term for certain non-­Muslim territory, though often construed, especially by Western writers, as a geopolitical concept implying the necessity for perpetual, even if generally latent, warfare between the Muslim state and its non-Muslim neighbors.

  • DĀR AL-FONŪN

    John Gurney and Negin Nabavi

    lit., “polytechnic college”; a college founded in Tehran in 1268/1851 by Mīrzā Ṭāqī Khan Amīr-e Kabīr, which marked the begin­ning of modern education in Persia.

  • DĀR AL-ŠŪRĀ-YE KOBRĀ

    Cross-Reference

    See WEZĀRAT.

  • DĀR AL-ŻARB

    Cross-Reference

    See ŻARRĀB-ḴĀNA.

  • DĀR(- E) TANHĀ

    Ernie Haerinck

    lit., “the lonely tree”; an ar­cheological site in the district of Badr, near the village of Jabar, ca. 70 km east-southeast of Īlām, in the province of Pošt-e Kūh.

  • DAR-E MEHR

    Mary Boyce

    a Zoroastrian term first recorded in the Persian Rivāyats and Parsi Gujarati writings.

  • DĀRĀ

    Cross-Reference

    See ĀL-E BĀVAND.

  • DĀRA, MIRZĀ

    Cross-Reference

    See ʿABDALLĀH MĪRZĀ DĀRĀ.

  • DĀRĀ (City)

    Michael Weiskopf

    the name of a Parthian city and of a Byzan­tine garrison town of the Sasanian period.

  • DĀRĀ ŠOKŌH

    Annemarie Schimmel

    (b. near Ajmer, 20 March 1615, d. Delhi, 12 August 1659), first son of the Mughal emperor Shah Jahān and his wife Momtāz Maḥall, religious thinker, mystic, poet, and author of a number of works in Persian.

  • DĀRĀ(B) (1)

    Aḥmad Tafażżolī

    or DĀRĀB, the name of two kings of the legendary Kayanid dynasty.

  • DĀRĀB (2)

    Massoud Kheirabadi, Dietrich Huff, Georgina Herrmann

    the name Dārāb refers both to a šahrestān (subprovince) of Fārs province and to its chief city.

  • DĀRĀB-NĀMA

    William L. Hanaway

    prose romance of the 12th century, by Abū Ṭāher Moḥammad b. Ḥasan b. ʿAlī b. Mūsā Ṭārsūsī (or Ṭarṭūsī), in which the adventures of the legendary Kayanid king Dārāb, son of Bahman (also called Ardašīr) and Homāy, variously identified as the daughter of king Sām Čāraš of Egypt or of Ardašīr (=Bahman), are recounted.

  • DĀRĀBGERD

    Cross-Reference

    See Dārā(b) II.

  • DĀRĀBĪ

    Cross-Reference

    See CITRUS FRUITS.

  • DĀRĀBĪ SAYYED JAʿFAR

    Andrew J. Newman

    b. Abī Esḥāq Mūsawī Borūjerdī Kašfī (b. Eṣṭahbānāt in Fārs, 1775, d. Borūjerd 1851), religious scholar, nephew of the Aḵbārī Yūsuf b. Aḥmad Baḥrānī and father of Sayyed Yaḥyā Waḥīd Dārābī.

  • DĀRĀBĪ SAYYED YAḤYĀ

    Moojan Momen

    (b. Yazd, ca. 1811, d. Neyrīz, 1850), Babi leader usually known as Waḥīd (unique), a title given him by the Bāb; the eldest son of Sayyed Jaʿfar Kašfī Eṣṭah-bānātī, he received a Muslim religious education and, like his father, was associated with the Qajar court.

  • DARABPAHLAN, DASTUR

    Kaikhusroo M. JamaspAsa

    Zoroastrian priest and author (b. Navsari, Gujarat, 1668, d. Navsari, 1 September 1734), eldest son of Pahlan Fredoon, who was accorded the title “dastur” (high priest) and the privilege of occupying the second chair in the Zoroastrian assembly of the small port of Navsari in 1670 or perhaps earlier.