Table of Contents

  • DARYĀ-YE ʿOMĀN

    Cross-Reference

    See ʿOMĀN, SEA OF.

  • DARYĀ-YE SĪĀH

    Cross-Reference

    See BLACK SEA.

  • DARYĀBEYGĪ

    Guity Nashat

    lit. "sea lord"; originally an Ottoman naval title dating from the 15th century.

  • DARYĀČA

    Cross-Reference

    For individual lakes, see entries under the respective names.

  • DĀRZĪN

    Mehrdad Shokoohy

    village on the road between Kermān and Bam on the site of a large, early medieval town. Ruins of  buildings of different periods still stand. The earliest are probably three small forts of similar form, built of straw-tempered rectangular mud bricks, which may date from the 8th or 9th century.

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  • DĀŠ ĀKOL

    SOHILA SAREMI

    a story in the first collection of short stories by Sadeq Hedayat.

  • DASĀTĪN

    Jean During

    the term for modes in early musical theory, translated into Arabic as aṣābeʿ (fingers) and sometimes also as mawājeb “obligations, laws.”

  • DASĀTĪR

    Fatḥ-Allāh Mojtabaʾī

    the most important tract of the Āḏar Kayvānī sect, almost certainly the work of its founder, Āḏar Kayvān.

  • DASCYLIUM

    Michael Weiskopf

    Achaemenid satrapy in northwestern Anatolia, part of the Persian empire until the 330s BCE. The borders varied, extending as far south as the Mysian plain and the southern Troad and east into the land of the Bithynian peoples; some satraps controlled both sides of the Hellespont.

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  • DASKARA(T AL- MALEK)

    Cross-reference

    or DASKARAT AL-MALEK. See DASTGERD.

  • DAŠLĪ

    Pierre Amiet

    or Dashly; oasis situated south of the Āmū Daryā, on the desert plain of northern Afghanistan, ancient Bactria, now in the province of Jūzjān ca 35 km northeast of Āqča.

  • DAŠNAK

    ARAM ARKUN

    short name for Hay Yełapʿoxakan Dašnakcʿutʿiwn (Armenian revolutionary federation [A.R.F.]) or its members.

  • DAŠT

    Eckart Ehlers

    lit. "plain, open ground"; Persian term for a very specific type of landscape, the extended gravel piedmonts and plains that are almost ubiquitous in arid central Persia.

  • DAŠT-E ARŽAN

    Sayyed ʿAlī Āl-e Dāwūd

    (also Arjan, Arzan, lit., “plain of the mountain or bitter almond”), a mountain basin ca. 14 x 5-6 km situated 1,500 m above sea level on the road from Shiraz to Kāzerūn.

  • DAŠT-E MOḠĀN

    Cross-Reference

    See MOḠĀN.

  • DAŠT-E NĀWOR

    Gérard Fussman

    lit. “plain of the lake”; a depression (average elev. 3,100 m) 60 x 15 km with a brackish lake in the center, located at 33° 41’ N and 67° 46’ E, about 60 km west of Ḡaznī.

  • DAŠT-E QALʿA

    Henri-Paul Francfort

    lit., “plain of the fortress”; small bāzār village on an irrigation canal near the junction of the Kōkča and Āmū Darya rivers in the province of Badaḵšān, northeastern Afghanistan, the site of several earlier settlements.

  • DASTA

    Peter J. Chelkowski

    the most common term for a ritual procession held in the Islamic lunar month of Moḥarram and the following month of Ṣafar, both periods of mourning for Imami Shiʿites. The procession commemorates the tragic death of Ḥosayn, grandson of the prophet Moḥammad and the third imam of the Shiʿites.

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  • DAŠTAKĪ, ʿAṬĀ-ALLĀH

    Andrew J. Newman

    (d. 1506, 1511, or 1520), a scholar of Hadith in Khorasan in the late Timurid and early Safavid periods.

  • DAŠTAKĪ, GĪĀṮ-AL-DĪN

    Andrew J. Newman

    b. Ṣadr-al-Dīn Moḥammad Šīrāzī Ḥosaynī (1462-1541), scholar, philosopher, and motakallem (theologian) of the late Timurid and early Safavid period, and, for a brief interval under Shah Ṭahmāsb, one of two ṣadrs (chief clerical overseers).