Table of Contents

  • ARDABĪL CARPET

    M. Beattie

    Neither carpet is complete. The Los Angeles one is considerably reduced in length, has lost its entire border and is now edged with a pile-woven strip of exceptionally regular weave. The London carpet is only slightly shortened, but the beginning of the field and the border are much restored, probably at the expense of the Los Angeles piece.

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  • ARDABĪLĪ

    W. Madelung

    known as MOQADDAS and MOḤAQQEQ ARDABĪLĪ, Imamite theologian and jurist of the early Safavid age. 

  • ARDAHANG

    Cross-Reference

    See ARŽANG.

  • ARDAKĀN-E FĀRS

    C. E. Bosworth

    a small upland town of the ostān of Fārs.

  • ARDAKĀN-E YAZD

    C. E. Bosworth

    a town of central Persia on the present Yazd-Ardestān-Kāšān road along the southern edge of the Dašt-e Kavīr, forty miles northwest of Yazd.

  • ARDAKĀNĪ, ABU’L-ḤASAN

    D. MacEoin

    known as Ḥāǰǰī Amīn and Amīn-e Elāhī, one of the four Ayādī-e Amr Allāh appointed by Bahāʾallāh as leaders of the Bahaʾi movement in Iran.

  • ARDALĀN, ABU’L-ḤASAN KHAN

    Cross-Reference

    See ABU’L-ḤASAN KHAN ARDALĀN.

  • ARDAMITRA

    Cross-Reference

    See ARDAŠĪR SAKĀNŠĀH.

  • ARDAŠĪR

    Dj. Khaleghi-Motlagh

    name of several figures in the Šāh-nāma.

  • ARDAŠĪR B. DAYLAMSOPĀR

    cross-reference

    See ABU’L-ḤAYJĀ NAJMĪ.

  • ARDAŠĪR BĀBAKĀN

    H. Gaube

    Sasanian and early Islamic district (ostān) formed in the early 7th century south of Baghdad and west of the Tigris. Its capital was Weh-Ardašīr (Ar. Bahrasīr).

  • ARDAŠĪR I

    Multiple Authors

    (d. 242 CE), the founder of the Sasanian empire. 

  • ARDAŠĪR I i. History

    Joseph Wiesehöfer

    by 224 extended his sway over Persis and beyond into Elymais (Ḵūzestān) and Kermān, forcing to submission many local kings and vassals of the Parthians. The extent of his original realm cannot be determined precisely.

  • ARDAŠĪR I ii. Rock reliefs

    H. Luschey

    The first Sasanian ruler Ardašīr I established the Sasanian tradition of rock carving, which flourished until the reign of Šāpūr III and made an impressive resurgence under Ḵosrow II. Ardašīr’s rock reliefs differ markedly from the few preserved Parthian specimens (as do his coins) and foreshadow a new monumental form.

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  • ARDAŠĪR II

    A. Sh. Shahbazi

    Sasanian king of kings, A.D. 379-83; he was deposed by the nobles in favor of Šāpūr III.

  • ARDAŠĪR III

    A. Sh. Shahbazi

    Sasanian king (r. September, 628-29 April, 629). His father Šērōyē (Kawād II) murdered most of the Sasanian princes and died after only a brief reign.

  • ARDAŠĪR MĪRZĀ

    Ḥ. Maḥbūbī Ardakānī

    ROKN-AL-DAWLA, the ninth son of the crown prince ʿAbbās Mīrzā, b. ca.1805-06, d. 1866.

  • ARDAŠĪR SAKĀNŠĀH

    A. Sh. Shahbazi

    a vassal king of the first Sasanian king of kings, Ardašīr I.

  • ARDAŠĪR-ḴORRA

    C. E. Bosworth

    one of the five administrative divisions (kūra) of Fārs, in Sasanian and early Islamic times.

  • ARDAŠĪR-NAMA

    A. Netzer

    a matnawī of six thousand couplets in Persian by Šāhīn Šīrāzī, a Jewish Persian poet of the 8th/14th century.