Table of Contents

  • ARDAŠĪR MĪRZĀ

    Ḥ. Maḥbūbī Ardakānī

    ROKN-AL-DAWLA, the ninth son of the crown prince ʿAbbās Mīrzā, b. ca.1805-06, d. 1866.

  • ARDAŠĪR SAKĀNŠĀH

    A. Sh. Shahbazi

    a vassal king of the first Sasanian king of kings, Ardašīr I.

  • ARDAŠĪR-ḴORRA

    C. E. Bosworth

    one of the five administrative divisions (kūra) of Fārs, in Sasanian and early Islamic times.

  • ARDAŠĪR-NAMA

    A. Netzer

    a matnawī of six thousand couplets in Persian by Šāhīn Šīrāzī, a Jewish Persian poet of the 8th/14th century.

  • ARDAVĀN

    Cross-Reference

    (ARDAWĀN). See ARTABANUS.

  • ARDERIKKA

    R. Schmitt

    name of two ancient villages.

  • ARDESTĀN

    X. De Planhol, R. Hillenbrand

    a town of central Iran between Kāšān and Nāʾīn.

  • ARDESTĀNI

    P. Lecoq

    the dialect spoken in the small town of Ardestān.

  • ARDESTĀNĪ, ʿALĪ-AKBAR ḤOSAYNĪ

    Cross-Reference

    See ʿALĪ AKBAR ḤOSAYNĪ ARDESTĀNĪ.

  • ARDUMANIŠ

    P. Lecoq

    a Persian, son of Vahauka.

  • ARDWAHIŠT

    M. Boyce

    one of the six great Aməša Spəntas who, with Ahura Mazdā and/or his Holy Spirit, make up the Zoroastrian Heptad. Of the six, Aša has the clearest pre-Zoroastrian antecedents.

  • ARDWAHIŠT YAŠT

    M. Boyce

    (ORDĪBEHEŠT YAŠT), the third in the series of Avestan hymns addressed to individual divinities. It is devoted to one of the greatest of the Zoroastrian Aməša Spəntas, Aša Vahišta.

  • ARDWĪSŪR

    Cross-Reference

    See ANĀHĪD.

  • ARDWĪSŪR YAŠT

    Cross-Reference

    See ĀBĀN YAŠT.

  • ARƎDVĪ SŪRĀ

    Cross-Reference

    See ANĀHĪD.

  • ʿĀREF QAZVĪNĪ

    J. Matīnī, M. Caton

    ABU’L-QĀSEM (ca. 1300-1352/1882-1934), poet, musician, and singer during and after the Constitutional Revolution. 

  • ʿĀREFĪ HERAVĪ

    Z. Safa

    a poet of the 9th/15th century contemporary with the Timurid Šāhroḵ.

  • AREIA

    Cross-Reference

    See HERAT ii. HISTORY, PRE-ISLAMIC PERIOD.

  • ARƎJAṰ.ASPA

    cross-reference

    See ARJĀSP.

  • ʿĀREŻ

    C. E. Bosworth

    the official in medieval eastern Islamic states who had charge of the administrative side of the military forces, being especially concerned with payment, recruitment, training, and inspection.