Table of Contents

  • ARISTAGORAS

    P. Tozzi

    tyrant of Miletus (late 6th-early 5th centuries B.C.).

  • ARIUS

    Cross-Reference

    See HARĪ-RŪD

  • ARIYĀRAMNA

    A. Sh. Shahbazi

    Old Persian proper name.

  • ARIZANTOI

    C. J. Brunner

    one of the six tribes of the Median nation as listed by Herodotus.

  • ʿARĪŻĪ, ABŪ ṬĀLEB ḤOSAYNĪ

    Cross-Reference

    Mughal scholar chiefly famous for his alleged discovery of Malfūẓāt-e Tīmūrī or Wāqeʿāt-e Tīmūrī, an autobiographical account of Tīmūr from the 7th to the 74th year of his life. See ABŪ ṬĀLEB ḤOSAYNĪ ʿARĪŻĪ.

  • ARJĀN TOMB

    Javier Alvarez-Mon

    the late Neo-Elamite elite burial near Behbahan in southwestern Iran contains a coffin and a few artifacts and may shed new light on the discussion of Persian heritage as related to the Elamites.

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  • ARJĀSP

    A. Tafażżolī

    a chief of the Iranian tribe of the Xyōns and an enemy of Kay Goštāsp, patron of Zoroaster.

  • ARJOMAND, Ḵalil

    Rava Azeredo da Silveira

    At the age of 21, in Grenoble, Kalil Arjomand devised an innovative mechanism for graded motorcar acceleration. This achievement, which prefigures his later creativity, was singled out by Esmaʿil Merʾāt, then supervisor of the Iranian students in France and later Minister of Education, in his reports to Iranian authorities.

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  • ARLEZ

    J. Russell

    Armenian term for a supernatural creature.

  • ARMAḠĀN

    L. P. Elwell-Sutton

    a monthly literary magazine founded in 1919.

  • ARMĀʾĪL

    Jes P. Asmussen

    legendary figure in the myth of Ẓaḥḥāk.

  • ARMAITI

    M. Boyce

    one of the six great Aməša Spəntas in Zoroastrianism.

  • ARMAVIR

    R. H. Hewsen

    one of the capitals of ancient Armenia.

  • ARMAZI

    D. M. Lang

    (or ARMAZ-TSIKHE), an important royal city of Georgia.

  • ARMENIA i. IMAGE OF PERSIANS IN

    Robert Thomson

    In the Sasanian period Armenians developed a self-awareness as Christians against the background of their earlier Iranian social and religious culture.

  • ARMENIA ii. ARMENIAN WOMEN IN THE LATE 19TH- AND EARLY 20TH-CENTURY PERSIA

    Houri Berberian

    In the 19th and early 20th centuries, Iranian Armenians were concentrated in Azerbaijan and Isfahan. When demographic studies included the numbers of women, these were noticeably smaller than those for men, most likely because male heads of families were less apt to report about female family members.

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  • ARMENIA AND IRAN

    Multiple Authors

    series of articles that covers Irano-Armenian relations in pre-modern times. 

  • ARMENIA and IRAN i. Armina, Achaemenid province

    R. Schmitt

    a province (satrapy) of the Achaemenid empire; the inhabitants are called Arminiya- “Armenian.” 

  • ARMENIA AND IRAN ii. The pre-Islamic period

    M. L. Chaumont

    under Darius and Xerxes had much narrower boundaries than the future Armenia of the Artaxiads and the Arsacids.

  • ARMENIA AND IRAN iii. Armenian Religion

    J. R. Russell

    In the formative period the Armenians appear to have absorbed Hurrian, Hittite, and Urartian elements in their religious beliefs. Iran, however, was to be the dominant influence in Armenian spiritual culture.