Table of Contents

  • SOLṬĀN ḤOSAYN

    Rudi Matthee

    (1668-1727), the ninth and last Safavid king, the eldest son of Shah Solaymān I. Like most Safavid rulers, he was most comfortable speaking Turkish, although he appears to have learned Persian as well.

  • SOLṬĀN WALAD

    Cross-Reference

    13th-14th-century Sufi shaikh and poet, son and eventual successor of Mawlānā Jalāl-al-Din Rumi(Mawlawi). See BAHĀʾ-AL-DĪN SOLṬĀN WALAD.

  • SOMĀʿI, ḤABIB

    Morteżā Ḥoseyni Dehkordi and EIr

    (1905-1946), an outstanding player of the santur (a kind of dulcimer).

  • SOPURḠĀN

    David G. Malick

    Neo-Aramaic Sipūrḡān, Assyrian village in the Urmia plain, situated on the Nazlu river, 26 km northeast of the city of Urmia.

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  • SORḴA

    Habib Borjian

    (locally: Sur), township and sub-province in Semnān Province.

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  • SORUSHIAN, Jamshid

    Carlo G. Cereti

    (1914-1999), a Zoroastrian community leader and author.

  • SOUR CHERRY

    Cross-Reference

    See ĀLBĀLŪ.

  • SOUR GRAPE jUICE

    Cross-Reference

    See ĀB-ḠŪRA.

  • SOUTH PERSIA RIFLES

    Floreeda Safiri

    (SPR), a locally recruited militia, commanded by British officers, and operating in the provinces of Fārs and Kermān from 1916 to 1921.

  • SOUTHEAST ASIA i. PERSIAN PRESENCE IN

    M. Ismail Marcinkowski

    Attention will be given to some of the most striking features of the Persian influences on Southeast Asian Islamic culture.

  • SOUTHEAST ASIA ii. SHIʿITES IN

    M. Ismail Marchinkowski

    Along with Sufism, Shiʿite elements too entered Malay-Indonesian Islam, certainly by way of southern India, where it was well represented.

  • SPĀHBED

    Rika Gyselen

     Sasanian title that denoted a high military rank and meant  ‘chief of an army, general.’

  • SPANDARMAD

    Cross-Reference

    one of the six great Aməša Spəntas in Zoroastrianism. See ĀRMAITI .

  • SPEAR

    Boris A. Litvinsky

    (Av. aršti- ‘spear,’ OPers. aršti ‘throwing weapon’ or ‘javelin’) is mentioned in the Avesta several times.

  • SPIEGEL, FRIEDRICH (VON)

    Rüdiger Schmitt

    (1820 -1905), German orientalist and scholar of Iranian studies.

  • SPULER, Bertold

    Werner Ende, Bert Fragner, Dagmar Riedel

    As a teenager Spuler lived through the economic and political turmoils of the 1920s following German defeat in World War I. He received a humanist education, with a focus on Latin and Greek, at the Bismarck Gymnasium in Karlsruhe. Spuler easily picked up languages.

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  • SRAOŠA

    William W. Malandra

    a major deity (yazata) in Zoroastrianism, whose great popularity reserved a place for him in Iranian Islam as the angel Surōš. In Avestan, the word occurs both as a noun and as a name. Its basic common meaning is “to hear and obey.”

  • STAMPS

    Cross-Reference

    see PHILATELY

  • STANZAIC POETRY

    Gabrielle van den Berg

    Stanzaic verse forms have been part of the corpus of classical Persian poetry from the early stage onwards and have continued to play a role until modern times,  alhough the quantity of stanzaic poetry in Persian literature is modest in comparison to other verse forms.

  • STARK, FREYA Madeline

    Malise Ruthven

    British travel-writer.  Her 1934 book The Valley of the Assassins and Other Persian Travels belongs to the canon of English travel literature.