Table of Contents

  • OḴOWWAT

    Nassereddin Parvin

    (Brotherhood), the name of four newspapers and one magazine published in Tabriz, Rašt, Shiraz, Kermānšāh, and Baghdad in the early 1900s.

  • OKRA

    Cross-Reference

    See BĀMĪA.

  • ʿOLAMĀ-YE ESLĀM

    Siamak Adhami

    “The Doctors of Islam,” title given to two medieval Zoroastrian polemical treatises written in Modern Persian.

  • OLEARIUS, ADAM

    Christoph Werner

    (1599-1671), German author, secretary to the Holstein mission to Persia (1635-39), noted for the detailed account of his travels in Russia and Persia.

  • OLIVE TREE

    Willem Floor

    (zaytun). The cultivated olive tree (Olea europaea L, Oleaceae) is a long-lived, evergreen tree native to the Mediterranean basin. It is valued for its fruit and oil.

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  • OLSHAUSEN, JUSTUS

    Rüdiger Schmitt

    (1800-1882), German theologian and Oriental scholar, one of the pioneers of Iranian studies in the German-speaking countries. His most important contribution to Iranian studies is his decipherment of the Pahlavi legends of Late Sasanian coins, by which he became almost a second decipherer of the Pahlavī script after Silvestre de Sacy. 

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  • OMAN, SEA OF

    Willem Floor

    the sea, or gulf, which divides Iran and the Arabian peninsula and forms the link between the Persian Gulf and the Arabian Sea.

  • OMM AL-KETĀB

    Farhad Daftary

    title of an anonymous Persian book associated with certain early Shiʿite ḡolāt (extremist) groups of southern Iraq. Originally published in Arabic, this work found its way into the manuscript collections of the Nezāri Ismaʿilis of Badaḵšān and became one of their most sacred and secret works, although it does not contain any known Ismaʿili doctrines.

  • ONO, Morio

    Ali Ferdowsi

    (1925-2001), eminent Japanese scholar and Iranologist.

  • ONṢOR AL-MAʿĀLI

    C. Edmund Bosworth

    , KAY KĀVUS b. Eskandar b. Qābus, penultimate prince of the Ziyarid dynasty of Tabaristan (Ṭabarestān) and Gilān, in origin Daylamite, which ruled in the 10th-11th centuries.