Table of Contents

  • LOTERĀʾI

    Martin Schwartz

    term used by Iranian Jews for speech using local Judeo-Iranian grammar with a special exotic substitutive vocabulary.

  • LOUVRE MUSEUM i. IRANIAN ANTIQUITIES IN THE COLLECTIONS

    Pierre Amiet

    In 1793, when the Louvre Museum (Musıe du Louvre) was created under the name of Central Museum of Arts (Musıe Centrale des Arts), antiquities were exclusively represented by Greek and Roman sculptures.

  • LOUVRE MUSEUM ii. PERSIAN ART IN THE ISLAMIC COLLECTION

    Sophie Makariou

    In 1893 a section devoted to “Muslim Art” was created within the Département des objets d’art, and from the outset objects from Persia have been a most important part of this collection.

  • LUKONIN, Vladimir Grigor’evich

    Muhammad Dandamayev and Inna Medvedskaya

    (1932-1984), outstanding Russian scholar in the field of history and history of culture and arts of ancient Iran, from the earliest times until the end of the Sasanian period. He published and introduced to scholarship many artifacts of Iranian culture preserved at the Hermitage Museum, including the unique hoard of Iranian silver drachms of the 3rd century CE and some objects of early Sasanian toreutics.

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  • LULUBI

    Ran Zadok

    country of a people who probably originated in southern Kurdistan; the form of the name is identical in both Sumerian and Akkadian, namely Lulubi and Lulubum respectively.

  • LURISTAN

    Multiple Authors

    major province in Iran

  • LURISTAN iv. The Origin of Nomadism

    Inge Demant Mortensen and Peder Mortensen

    The large valleys and plains of Luristan are exceedingly fertile.  They have often been described as suited for agriculture as well as for pastoral nomadism, which seems to have been the prevailing lifestyle for hundreds of years.

  • LURISTAN BRONZES i. THE FIELD RESEARCH

    Bruno Overlaet

    The label “Luristan bronzes”  designates a series of decorated bronze objects in a specific local style dating from the Iron Age (ca. 1300/1250 to 700/650 BCE). These bronzes became known through large-scale illegal excavations starting in the late 1920s, but their cultural context and provenance remained uncertain for a long time and the label is often wrongfully used—usually for commercial reasons—for bronze objects from other regions or periods.

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  • LURISTAN BRONZES ii. CHRONOLOGY

    Bruno Overlaet

    The first documented Luristan bronze acquired by a European museum, “a master of animals idol,” was purchased in 1854 by the British Museum. The first publication about a Luristan bronze in a scholarly journal dates from 1918. It attributed a Luristan horse bit with decorated cheek pieces to Armenia.

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  • LUSCHEY, Heinz

    Wolfram Kleiss

    After his military service during the Second World War, Luschey worked as an assistant at the Archaeological Seminar of the University of Tübingen. In 1956 he became assistant director of the Istanbul branch of the German Archaeological Institute.

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