Table of Contents

  • JEJEEBHOY, JAMSETJEE

    Jesse S. Palsetia

    , Sir (1783-1859), Parsi businessman and philanthropist. He was a product of the age of partnership and commercial collaboration begun with the introduction of European imperialism in Asia in the late 18th and early 19th centuries. The consignment of Indian opium to East Asia constituted his major business enterprise. His charitable projects and loyalty to the British garnered him honors and public acclaim.

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  • JELD

    cross-reference

    See BOOKBINDING 1BOOKBINDING 2.

  • JELWA, ABU’L-ḤASAN

    Mahdi Khalaji

    b. Moḥammad Ṭabāṭabāʾi (1823-1897), a leading Shiʿite scholar and master teacher of philosophy and mathematics.

  • JELWA, KETĀB AL-

    Philip Kreyenbroek

    (Kurd. Kitēba jilwe “the Book of splendor”), title of a notional sacred text in Yazidism.

  • JEM SOLṬĀN

    Osman G. Özgüdenli

    (or Šāhzāda Jem, 1459-1495), Ottoman prince and poet.

  • JEMĀLI

    Osman G. Özgüdenli

    Ottoman poet and writer of the 15th century.

  • JEN-NĀMA

    Mohammad Reza Ghanoonparvar

    (The book of jinn, Sweden, 1998), the last novel of Hushang Golshiri, arguably his magnum opus.

  • JENJĀN

    Daniel T. Potts

    coll. Jenjun, “Jinjun,” village in western Fārs, small archeological site of the Achaemenid period. 

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  • JENKINSON, ANTHONY

    Stephan Schmuck

    (1529-1611), merchant and traveler. On 2 November 1562, he arrived in Qazvin, the seat of Shah Ṭahmāsp (r. 1524-76). But the shah did not wish to jeopardize his recently concluded peace with the Ottoman empire, so that Jenkinson was neither well received at court nor did he obtain the desired documents. In his writings, Jenkinson succinctly described his journeys to regions never before visited by English travelers.

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  • JENN

    cross-reference

    See GENIE.