Table of Contents

  • DŌŠĪ

    Daniel Balland

    small town and district on the northern slope of the central Hindu Kush in Afghanistan.

  • DOŠMANZĪĀRĪ

    Pierre Oberling

    name of two Lor tribes in southern Persia, the Došmanzīārī-e Mamasanī and the Došmanzīārī-e Kūhgīlūya.

  • DŌST MOḤAMMAD KHAN

    Amin H. Tarzi

    (b. Qandahār December 1792, d. Herat, 9 June 1863), first ruler of the Bārakzay/Moḥammadzay dynasty of Afghanistan. He was the first to bring the region that today constitutes Afghanistan under the control, occasionally tenuous, of a single central government.

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  • DOTĀR

    Jean During

    long-necked lute of the tanbūr family, usually with two strings (do tār). The principal feature is the pear-shaped sound box attached to a neck that is longer than the box and faced with a wooden soundboard. Dotārs can be classified in several different types.

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  • DOZĀLA

    Jean During

    kind of flute consisting of two parallel pipes pierced with holes and fitted with a removable vibrating mouthpiece made by cutting a U-shaped incision into a thin reed.

  • DOZDĀB

    Cross-Reference

    See ZĀHEDĀN.

  • DOZY, REINHARD PETRUS ANNE

    J. T. P. de Bruijn

    (b. Leiden, 21 February 1820, d. Leiden, 29 April 1883), Dutch orientalist renowned especially as a lexicographer of Arabic and a historian of Muslim Andalusia.

  • DRAGON

    Cross-Reference

    See AŽDAHĀ.

  • DRAINAGE

    Eckart Ehlers

    ,the carrying away of excess surface water through runoff in permanent or intermittent streams. Persia can be divided into four main drainage regions: the Caspian region, the Lake Urmia region, the Persian Gulf region, and the interior. Most of it is characterized by endorheic basins, that is, by interior drainage.

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  • DRAMA

    M. R. Ghanoonparvar

    in formal Western terms a relatively new art form in Persia, though various types of dramatic performance, including religious plays and humorous satirical skits, have long been a part of Persian religious and folk tradition.