Table of Contents

  • DAWĀNUS

    Dariush Kargar

    the name of a man seen in the other world by Ardā Wirāz, as described in both the Middle Persian and the Zoroastrian Persian versions of the Ardā Wirāz-nāmag.

  • DAWĀT

    LINDA KOMAROFF

    lit. "inkwell"; a utilitarian receptacle that also served as a symbol or metaphor for the instrument of state, with a long history in Islamic Persia. Inkwells were characterized in Persian poetry and historical works from the 10th century on as symbols of royal and by extension ministerial office.

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  • DAʿWAT AL-ESLĀM

    Nassereddin Parvin

    A biweekly Persian journal published in Bombay by Ḥājj Sayyed Moḥammad Dāʿī-al-Eslām from 19 October 1906 until the end of 1909.

  • DAʿWAT-E ESLĀMĪ

    Nassereddin Parvin

    lit. "the Islamic call"; a monthly religious journal published in Kermānšāh from November-December 1927 to June 1936.

  • DAWĀTDĀR

    C. Edmund Bosworth

    lit. “keeper, bearer of [the royal] inkwell or inkstand”; title of various officials in medieval Islamic states.

  • DAWLATĀBĀD

    Daniel Balland

    name of several localities in Afghanistan that have grown up around civil or military government buildings.

  • DAWLATĀBĀDĪ, SAYYED ʿALĪ-MOḤAM-MAD

    Cyrus Amir-Mokri

    (b. Dawlatābād, 1868, d. Tehran, Šawwāl May-June 1923), prominent politician and deputy of the Persian parliament.

  • DAWLATĀBĀDĪ, SAYYED YAḤYĀ

    Abbas Amanat

    (b. Dawlatābād. near Isfahan, 8 January 1863, d. Tehran, 26 October 1939), celebrated educator, political activist, and memoirist of the constitutional and postconstitutional periods.

  • DAWLATĀBĀDĪ, ṢEDDĪQA

    Mehranguiz Manoutchehrian

    (b. Isfahan, 1883, d. Tehran, 28 July 1961), journalist, educator, and pioneer in the movement to emancipate women in Persia.

  • DAWLATḴĒL

    Daniel Balland

    tribal name common among the eastern Pashtun at various levels of tribal segmentation.

  • DAWLATŠĀH, AMIR

    ḎABĪH-ALLĀH ṢAFĀ

    (b. ca. 1438, d. 1494 or 1507), one of the few authors before the 16th century to have devoted a work entirely to poets, arranged more or less chronologically.

  • DAWLATŠĀH, MOḤAMMAD-ʿALĪ MĪR-ZĀ

    Abbas Amanat

    (1789-1821), eldest son of Fatḥ-ʿAlī Shah and powerful prince-governor of western provinces of Persia.

  • DAWLATZĪ

    Daniel Balland

    (singular Dawlatzay), ethnic name common among the eastern Pashtun on both sides of the Durand Line.

  • DAWR (1)

    Farhad Daftary

    (Ar. and Pers.), period, era, or cycle of history, a term used by Ismaʿilis in connection with their conceptions of time and the religious history of mankind.

  • DAWR (2)

    Jean During

    Lāḏeqī, who represented the Ottoman tradition, first described eighteen cycles “widely current in our days,” then three new and less common rhythmic cycles and nine obsolete cycles, among them four that had been the creations of Marāḡī. Fourteen of these cycles were later cited in Bahjat al-rūḥ, which includes mention of about thirty rhythmic cycles.

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  • DAWRAQ

    C. Edmund Bosworth

    or Dawraq al-Fors; name of a district (kūra), also known as Sorraq, and of a town that was sometimes its chef-lieu in medieval Islamic times.

  • DAWTĀNĪ

    Daniel Balland

    Most Dawtānī nomads wintered in the North-West Frontier Province of Pakistan, in either southern Waziristan or Dērajāt. A minority wintered in southern Afghanistan, mainly in the Qandahār oasis, where some owned houses, or in the middle Helmand valley. From a social geographical point of view, four different subgroups can thus be distinguished.

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  • DĀWŪD

    Fatḥ-Allāh Mojtabāʾī

    or DĀʾŪD; the biblical David, mentioned in a number of passages in the Koran as the hero who fought with and killed Jālūt, the prophet who received the Book of Psalms (Zabūr) from God, and the king who was given the power to rule, enforce justice, and distinguish between truth and falsehood.

  • DĀWŪD B. MOʾMEN

    Cross-Reference

    See JEWISH PERSIAN LITERATURE.

  • DĀWŪD KHAN, MOḤAMMAD

    Barnett Rubin

    (b. Kabul, 1909; d. Kabul, 27 April 1978), prime minister (1953-63) and first president of Afghanistan (1973-78). During his tenure as minister (known as “Dāwūd’s decade”),  he transformed the Afghan state.Throughout his career he combined a strong desire to modernize the country with a close identification with the military.

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