Table of Contents

  • DAQĀYEQĪ MARVAZĪ, ŠAMS-AL-DĪN MOḤAMMAD

    J. T. P. de Bruijn

    b. ʿAlī, the supposed author of a version of the Baḵtīār­nāma, who lived from the late 12th to the 13th century.

  • DAQĪQĪ, ABŪ MANṢŪR AḤMAD

    Djalal Khaleghi-Motlagh

     b. Aḥmad, one of the famous poets of the last years of the Samanid (819-1005) dynasty.

  • DAQQĀQ, ABŪ ʿALĪ

    Cross-Reference

    See ABŪ ʿALĪ DAQQĀQ.

  • ḎARʿ

    cross-reference

    See WEIGHTS AND MEASURES.

  • DĀR AL- ḤARB

    Hamid Algar

    “the realm of war”; lands not under Islamic rule, a juridical term for certain non-­Muslim territory, though often construed, especially by Western writers, as a geopolitical concept implying the necessity for perpetual, even if generally latent, warfare between the Muslim state and its non-Muslim neighbors.

  • DĀR AL-FONŪN

    John Gurney and Negin Nabavi

    lit., “polytechnic college”; a college founded in Tehran in 1268/1851 by Mīrzā Ṭāqī Khan Amīr-e Kabīr, which marked the begin­ning of modern education in Persia.

  • DĀR AL-ŠŪRĀ-YE KOBRĀ

    Cross-Reference

    See WEZĀRAT.

  • DĀR AL-ŻARB

    Cross-Reference

    See ŻARRĀB-ḴĀNA.

  • DĀR(- E) TANHĀ

    Ernie Haerinck

    lit., “the lonely tree”; an ar­cheological site in the district of Badr, near the village of Jabar, ca. 70 km east-southeast of Īlām, in the province of Pošt-e Kūh.

  • DAR-E MEHR

    Mary Boyce

    a Zoroastrian term first recorded in the Persian Rivāyats and Parsi Gujarati writings.