Table of Contents

  • ĀḠĀJĪ BOḴĀRĪ

    ʿA. Zaryāb

    Samanid amir and poet.

  • AḠĀNĪ, KETĀB AL-

    K. Abu-Deeb

    (“The Book of Songs”), the major work of Abu’l-Faraǰ Eṣfahānī (284-356/897-967).

  • ĀḠĀSĪ

    Cross-Reference

    See ĀQĀSĪ.

  • AGATHANGELOS

    R. W. Thomson

    (Greek for “messenger of good news”), the supposed author of a History of the Armenians, which describes the conversion of King Trdat of Armenia to Christianity at the beginning of the 4th century CE.

  • AGATHIAS

    M.-L. Chaumont

    Byzantine historian, b. 536 or 537 in Myrina, a small village in Asia Minor, d. about 580.

  • AGIARY

    Cross-Reference

    See ĀTAŠKADA.

  • ĀḠKAND

    R. Schnyder

    It was made by local workshops in the time of the Eldigüzids. Pieces which were reputedly found at Ray show that the ware was exported to a limited extent. Nothing indicates that the production survived the Mongol invasions of Azerbaijan, though similar pottery continued to be produced in the 7th/13th century in east Anatolia and north Syria.

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  • ĀḠOŠ VEHĀḎĀN

    A. Tafażżolī

    (Āḡoš son of Vehāḏ), king of Gīlān at the time of Kay Ḵosrow, the Kayanid king, and one of the commanders of his armies.

  • AGRA

    G. Hambly

    City and district center in the state of Uttar Pradesh in northern India, situated on the west bank of the river Jumna (Yamonā) approximately 125 miles south of Delhi.

  • AḠRĒRAṮ

    Dj. Khaleghi-Motlagh

    (Av. Aγraēraθa), Turanian warrior and brother of Afrāsīāb in the Avestan yašts and in the the Šāh-nāma.