Table of Contents

  • ĀḠĀJĀRĪ

    J. Qāʾem-Maqāmī

    town in Ḵūzestān and district (bakš) in the county (šahrestān) of Behbahān, situated seventy-eight km to the northwest of the city of Behbahān.

  • ĀḠĀJĪ

    ʿA. Zaryāb

    title of a court official in the administrations of the Ghaznavids and Saljuqs.

  • ĀḠĀJĪ BOḴĀRĪ

    ʿA. Zaryāb

    Samanid amir and poet.

  • AḠĀNĪ, KETĀB AL-

    K. Abu-Deeb

    (“The Book of Songs”), the major work of Abu’l-Faraǰ Eṣfahānī (284-356/897-967).

  • ĀḠĀSĪ

    Cross-Reference

    See ĀQĀSĪ.

  • AGATHANGELOS

    R. W. Thomson

    (Greek for “messenger of good news”), the supposed author of a History of the Armenians, which describes the conversion of King Trdat of Armenia to Christianity at the beginning of the 4th century CE.

  • AGATHIAS

    M.-L. Chaumont

    Byzantine historian, b. 536 or 537,  d. about 580. Among other matters, Agathias’s History treats the war which was fought between Justinian and Xusraw I (Chosroes) in Lazica in 552-56—a war successfully conducted on the Persian side by the generals Mihr-Mihrōē (Mermeroes) and Naxwaragān (Nachoragan). Digressions, on the Persians in general and the Sasanians in particular, contain much information of interest.

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  • AGIARY

    Cross-Reference

    See ĀTAŠKADA.

  • ĀḠKAND

    R. Schnyder

    It was made by local workshops in the time of the Eldigüzids. Pieces which were reputedly found at Ray show that the ware was exported to a limited extent. Nothing indicates that the production survived the Mongol invasions of Azerbaijan, though similar pottery continued to be produced in the 7th/13th century in east Anatolia and north Syria.

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  • ĀḠOŠ VEHĀḎĀN

    A. Tafażżolī

    (Āḡoš son of Vehāḏ), king of Gīlān at the time of Kay Ḵosrow, the Kayanid king, and one of the commanders of his armies.