T~ CAPTIONS OF ILLUSTRATIONS

list of all the figure and plate images in the T entries

 

T~ ENTRIES: CAPTIONS OF ILLUSTRATIONS

Entry Image Caption
TABRIZv. The city in the 19th century Figure 1. “A courtyard adjoining the bazaar." (Jackson, photograph following p. 46)
TABRIZ x. Monuments x(1). The Blue Mosque Figure 1. Tabriz, Blue Mosque, map. Line drawing after material in the Miraṯ-e Farhangi Archives, Tabriz.
TABRIZ x. Monuments x(1). Figure 2. Tabriz, Blue Mosque, portal (pištāq). (© Aube 2006)
TABRIZ x. Monuments x(1). Figure 3. Tabriz, Blue Mosque, dome chamber, view of the north side. (© Aube 2004)
TABRIZ x. Monuments x(1). Figure 4. Tabriz, Blue Mosque, mausoleum, alabaster slab of the main prayer niche. (© Aube 2004)
TABRIZ x. Monuments x(1). Figure 5. Tabriz, Blue Mosque, mausoleum, arch flanking the entrance, vase panel consisting of mosaic tile. (© Aube 2004)
TABRIZ x. Monuments x(1). Figure 6. Tabriz, Blue Mosque, portal (pištāq), geometric panel consisting of mosaic tile with relief. (© Aube 2004)
TABRIZ x. Monuments x(1). Figure 7. Tabriz, Blue Mosque, portal (pištāq), vegetal panel consisting of mosaic tile with relief. (© Aube 2004)
TABRIZ x. Monuments x(1). Figure 8. Tabriz, Blue Mosque, portal (pištāq), vegetal panel consisting of mosaic tile with relief. (© Aube 2004)
TABRIZ x. Monuments x(1). Figure 9. Tabriz, Blue Mosque, south side of the building, decorative panel consisting of mosaic and brick. (© Aube 2006)
TABRIZ x. Monuments x(1). Figure 10. Tabriz, Blue Mosque, mausoleum, gilded hexagonal blue tiles. (© Aube 2006)
TABRIZ x. Monuments x(1). Figure 11. Tabriz, Blue Mosque, south side of the building, bannāʾipanel with blue-and-white tiles. (© Aube 2004)
TABRIZ x. Monuments x(1). Figure 12. Tabriz, Blue Mosque, four blue-and-white tiles. Line drawing after of a photograph in the personal archives of J. Torābi Ṭabāṭabāʾi. Courtesy of J. Torābi Ṭabāṭabāʾi.
TABRIZ x. Monuments x(1). Figure 13. Tabriz, Blue Mosque, blue-and-white tile. Line drawing of LACMA M.2002.1.304.
TABRIZ x. Monuments x(1). Figure 14. Tabriz, Blue Mosque, blue-and-white tile (orig. 16.4 × 14.2 cm). France, Sèvres, Cité de la Céramique, MNC2009.0.116. Courtesy of the Cité de la Céramique.
TABRIZ x. Monuments x(1). Figure 15. Istanbul, Çinili Köṣk, bannāʾipanel with blue-and-white tiles. (© Aube 2006)
TABRIZ x. Monuments x(1). Figure 16a, b. Tabriz, Blue Mosque, minarets, blue-and-white molded tiles, two of which also show turquoise. (© Aube 2004)
TABRIZ x. Monuments x(1). Figure 17a, b, c. Tabriz, Blue Mosque, portal (pištāq), luster tiles on the base of the columns. (© Aube 2004)
TAFAŻŻOLI, AḤMAD Figure 1. Aḥmad Tafażżoli. (Photograph from the Tafazzoli Memorial Volume, dust jacket)
TAHERIDS Figure 1. Muhammadiyya dirham. (With permission of the owner).
TĀJ-al-SALṬANA Figure 1. Tāj-al-Salṭana, undated painting by unknown artist. (Courtesy of Najmeh Batmanglij)
TAJIK ii. TAJIK PERSIAN   Figure 1. Evolution of Tajik vowels (after Lazard, 1956, p. 7).
TAJIK ii. Figure 2. Tajik vowels.

TAKLAMAKAN

Figure 1. Taklamakan Desert and Tarim Basin. © Alain Cariou, 2008 – all rights reserved.
TAKLAMAKAN Figure 2. Taklamakan Desert, the cross-desert highway between Minfeng and Luntai, drifting sand dunes, with a fence of dry reeds and a “green corridor” of irrigated trees, protecting the highway against the encroaching sands. © Alain Cariou, 2008 – all rights reserved.
TAḴT-E SOLAYMĀN Figure 1. Taḵt-e Solaymān, Ādur Gušnasp sanctuary. Plan of the Sasanian Period. Courtesy of the author.
TAḴT-E SOLAYMĀN Figure 2. ḵt-e Solaymān , columnar hall of the second fire temple. Courtesy of the author.
TAḴT-E SOLAYMĀN Figure 3. Taḵt-e Solaymān, altar room of the second temple with three-stepped base of the fire altar. Courtesy of the author.
TAḴT-E SOLAYMĀN Figure 4. Taḵt-e Solaymān, palace of Abaqa Khan. Plan of the Sekhanid period. Courtesy of the author.
ṬĀLEBUF, ʿABD-AL-RAḤIM Figure 1. ʿAbd-al-Raḥim Ṭālebuf, undated b/w photograph by unknown photographer, from: Ṭālebuf, Āzādi o siāsat, ed. I. Afšar, Tehran, 1978, unnumbered plate.
ṬĀLEBUF, ʿABD-AL-RAḤIM Figure 2. ʿAbd-al-Raḥim Ṭālebuf, Safina-ye Ṭālebi yā Ketāb-e Aḥmad, Istanbul, 1893; title page.
TAMIŠA WALL Figure 1. Satellite image of the northern parts of the Tamiša Wall, including the probable submerged fort in the Gulf of Gorgan. (Corona satellite image by courtesy of the U.S. Geological Survey, first examined by T. Wilkinson and N. Galiatsatos)
TANG-e SARVAK Plate I. Tang-e Sarvak, the top register of the northeast side of Block II (drawing Erik Smekens, Ghent University).
TANG-e SARVAK Plate II. Tang-e Sarvak, the north and northwest side of Block II (drawing Erik Smekens, Ghent University).
TANG-e SARVAK Plate III. Tang-e Sarvak, Block III (drawing Erik Smekens, Ghent University).

ṬARZI, Maḥmud

Figure 1. Maḥmud Tarzi.
TAʿZIA Figure 1. The arch-villain Šemr riding in the Moḥarram dasta. Mehriz near Yazd, 1977. Courtesy of the author.
TAʿZIA Figure 2. Taʿzia-kāravāni: the sequences of the play are performed on flatbed trucks that move through towns. Suburbs of Yazd, 1998. Courtesy of the author.
TAʿZIA Figure 3.The Takia Dowlat, after Kamāl-al-Molk. Courtesy of the author.
TAʿZIA Figure 4. The round stage erected especially for the taʿzia performances in the courtyard of Takia Moʿāven. Kermanshah, June 1999, the centennial observances of the takia. Courtesy of the author.
TAʿZIA Figure 5. A rectangular stage in the takia of Natanz. Moḥarram, 1998. Courtesy of the author.
TAʿZIA Figure 6. A pediment is visible over the box reserved for important dignitaries. The Karbala tragedy and the Last Judgment are depicted on this pediment in colored tiles. Ḥosayniya Mošir, Shiraz, August 1976. Courtesy of the author.
TAʿZIA Figure 7. The band that encircles the stage is covered with sand and is used for battles and the movement of people and animals. In this illustration, ʿAbbās, the standard bearer of Ḥosayn, has reached the Euphrates River, represented by a flat basin of water, just beyond the band. ʿAbbās wears a white shroud over his uniform, symbolizing his readiness for martyrdom. In his left hand he holds the standard and a water skin. With his right hand, he scoops up water while singing a moving aria to the Euphrates. Ḥosayniya Mošir, Shiraz, August 1976. Courtesy of the author.
TAʿZIA Figure 8.  A performer on the left reads his lines from a crib of paper that he holds in the palm of his hand.  Reading the lines indicates that the costumed performer is only a role carrier and does not pretend to be the person he depicts.  Ḥosayniya Mošir, Shiraz, August 1976. Courtesy of the author.
TAʿZIA Figure 9. Taʿzia of The Martyrdom of ʿali-Akbar. The hero is intercepted by his uncle ʿAbbās to test his courage. ʿAbbās hides his face behind a veil. This is a good example of how the circular band of sand is utilized. Ḥosayniya Mošir, Shiraz, August 1976. Courtesy of the author.
TAʿZIA Figure 10. After seeing all of his male companions killed in front of his very eyes, Ḥosayn’s anguish and pain are intense. He readies himself for his final battle and martyrdom by donning a white shroud, which creates the first catharsis. The second catharsis comes when he is killed. Ḥosayniya Mošir, Shiraz, August 1976. Courtesy of the author.
TAʿZIA Figure 11.  Ḥosayn on the way to battle.  Ḥosayniya Mošir, Shiraz, August 1976. Courtesy of the author.
TAʿZIA Figure 12. The Genies come to aid Ḥosayn, but he refuses their help, saying: “I must die to keep the purity of the faith.” Ḥosayniya Mošir, Shiraz, August 1976. Courtesy of the author.
TAʿZIA Figure 13.  Šemr kills Ḥosayn.  Ḥosayniya Mošir, Shiraz, August 1976. Courtesy of the author.
TAʿZIA Figure 14. The final scene in the taʿzia of The Martyrdom of Ḥosayn. The central stage is strewn with dead bodies. The lion guards the corpses and holds up the green flag of the Family of the Prophet. Ḥosayniya Mošir, Shiraz, August 1976. Courtesy of the author.
TAʿZIA Figure 15.  Taʿzia: an imaginary representation of the tomb of Ḥosayn.  Bonas Village, Trinidad, Moḥarram 1412/July-August 1991. Courtesy of the author.
TAʿZIA Figure 16.  Piš-ḵᵛāni, a prologue to the play is being sung by the entire troupe.  Ḥosayniya Mošir, Shiraz, 1976. Courtesy of the author.

TENTS in Iran ii. Variety, Construction,  and Use

Figure  1. Lak, Torkašvand, in summer quarters near Ḵorramābād, 1970.
TENTS ii. Figure 2. Qašqāʾi, Kaškuli-e Bozorg, summer quarters in Zagros Mountains, Chief’s tent, 1970.
TENTS ii. Figure 3. Qašqāʾi, Darrešuri, summer quarters near Mehrigird, interior of tent of Zaki Khan, 1970.
TENTS ii. Figure 4. Qašqāʾi, Darrešuri, summer quarters near Mehrigird, interior of Chief’s tent, men’s side, 1970.
TENTS ii. Figure  5. Qašqāʾi, Kaškuli-e Kuček, summer quarters in Zagros Mountains, interior of Chief’s tent, women’s side, 1970.
TENTS ii. Figure 6. ʿArab, ʿAbdur Silawi, Dašt-e Mišān, near Ahvāz, summer, 1970.
TENTS ii. Figure 7. Kurd: Milān, Amui, Nāder Khan’s camp, summer quarters at Yumru Taš (Western Azerbāijān), 1974.
TENTS ii. Figure 8. Sangesari, Mt. Damāvand, summer quarters, 1970.
TENTS ii. Figure  9. Baluč, Narui, 1970.
TENTS ii. Figure 10. Taymuri tunnel tent near Torbat-e Šaiḵ Ḡām, summer, 1970.
TENTS ii. Figure 11. Turkmen, Yomut, Atabay, Dašt-e Gorgān, white wedding tent, 1970.
TENTS ii. Figure 12. Turkmen, Yomut, Düyeḡi, on migration near Marāva Tappa, 1970.
TENTS ii. Figure 13. Šāhsevān: Tāleš-Miḵaylu, Mt. Sabalān, summer quarters, 1970.
TENTS ii. Figure 14. Šāhsevān: Tāleš-Miḵaylu, Mt. Sabalān, summer quarters, interior of tent, 1970.
TENTS ii. Figure 15. Tāleš armature tent frame with wattled walls in summer quarters above Māsula, 1970.
TENTS ii. Figure 16. Tāleš armature tent on drystone walls in summer quarters above Māsula, 1970.
TENTS ii. Figure 17. Baluč and Brahui of Afghanistan and Pakistan from Arḡandāb, 1954 (after Ferdinand, 1959b).
TENTS ii. Figure 18. Uzbek of Afghanistan, Burka from Tāḡčašma, Nahrin (frame), 1973.
TENTS ii. Figure 19. Firuzkuhi of Afghanistan, Darāzi from Siniyā, 1970.
TENTS ii. Figure 20. Firuzkuhi of Afghanistan, Ḥodāyāri from Tilak-e Soflā, Čaḡčarān (frame), 1970.
TENTS ii. Figure 21. Firuzkuhi of Afghanistan, Ḥodāyāri from Tilak-e Soflā, Čaḡčarān (complete tent), 1970.
TENTS ii. Figure 22. Uzbek, Qarluq, Mongol, ʿArab and Tajik of Afghanistan (from north of Samangān), after Szabo and Barfield, 1991.
TENTS ii. Figure 23. Uzbek of Afghanistan, Burka from Tāḡčašma, Nahrin (complete tent), 1973.
TEPE HISSAR Figure 1. Completed Plan of the Period III B, Burned Building, 2400-2290 BC, 1976.
TEPE HISSAR  Figure 2. applique Ibex (H3211); one of five from Hoard I. Treasure Hall; Period IIIC, 1940-1705 BC, 1932.
TEPE HISSAR  Figure 3. grey pottery vessels from CF 58 Room 3; Period IIB, 3170-2915 BC, 1976.
TILLA BULAK  Figure 1. Tilla Bulak, Sapalli Culture sites. (Courtesy of the author).
TILLA BULAK  Figure 2. Tilla Bulak, plan of the younger phase. (Courtesy of the author).
TILLA BULAK  Figure 3. Tilla Bulak, Seal TB-KF-557. (Courtesy of the author).
TRAJAN  Figure 1. Map of Trajan’s domain: the frontier.

ṬUSI, NAṢIR-AL-DIN ii. As mathematician and astronomer

Figure 1. The Ṭusi Couple. . Given: two spheres AGB, and HGD, where the diameter of AGB is twice the size of that of HGD. If the larger sphere moves in one direction while the smaller sphere moves in the opposite direction at twice the speed, then the inner point of tangency H will move along the diameter of the larger sphere ADB.
ṬUSI, NAṢIR-AL-DIN ii. Figure 2.  The proof of the Ṭusi Couple. .  On the left is the proof that was offered by Ṭusi in 1261, while that on the right was offered by Copernicus in 1543.  Willy Hartner first noticed that even the lettering of the two diagrams was for all intents and purposes identical, that is, where Ṭusi had alef in the Arabic diagram, Copernicus had “A”; where Ṭusi had bāʾ, Copernicus had “B,” and so on. What Hartner did not notice is that even the letter żain, which was used to designate the center of the smaller sphere by Ṭusi, was misread as fāʾ due to the similarities between the two letters in the Arabic script and rendered with an “F” in the Latin text of Copernicus.

(Cross-Reference)

Last Updated: August 28, 2015