Table of Contents

  • KASRAVI, AḤMAD ii. ASSASSINATION

    Moḥammad Amini

    The surge in activities of Islamic groups and the intensification of the rhetoric of mullahs at mosques coincided with the escalation and sharpening of Kasravi’s criticism of the foundation of Shiʿite concepts and values.

  • KASRAVI, AḤMAD iii. AS HISTORIAN

    Alireza Manafzadeh

    At the time when Kasravi began to write history, most historical research in Iran was carried out within the framework of political historiography with a nationalist purpose.

  • KASRAVI, AḤMAD iv. AS LINGUIST

    Pending

    Pending online.

  • KASRAVI, AḤMAD v. AS SOCIAL AND RELIGIOUS REFORMER

    Mohammad Amini

    Kasravi founded the “Society of Free Men” (Bāhamād-e āzādegān), announced his call for pākdini (pure faith)—born out of his sense of prophetic mission—and became the most outspoken intellectual against religious superstition and illusion. 

  • KASRAVI, AḤMAD vi. ON MYSTICISM AND PERSIAN SUFI POETRY

    Lloyd Ridgeon

    By the turn of the 20th century the Sufi tradition in Iran no longer enjoyed the popularity and following that it attracted in previous centuries.

  • KASRAVI, AḤMAD vii. A BIBLIOGRAPHICAL SURVEY

    EIr. and M. Amini

    Aḥmad Kasravi was a prolific writer. From the age of 25, when he began to write in Tabriz in 1915, until his assassination 30 years later in 1946.

  • KASRA’I, Siavash

    Kāmyār ʿĀbedi

    While still in high school, Kasra’i made friends with such political figures as Moḥsen Pezeškpur and Dāriuš Foruhar, and was influenced by their nationalistic sentiments. As a college student, however, he became enthralled by the ideals of a just and classless society based on Marxist doctrines, and became a loyal member of the Tudeh Party.

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  • ḴĀṢṢ BEG

    C. Edmund Bosworth

    ARSLĀN B. PALANG-ERI, Turkish ḡolām who became the ḥājeb “chamberlain” and court favorite of the Great Saljuq Sultan Masʿud b. Moḥammad b. Malek Šāh (r. 1134-52).

  • ḴĀṢṢ O ʿĀM

    Cross-Reference

    See CLASS SYSTEM iv. MEDIEVAL PERIOD.

  • ḴĀṢṢA

    Willem Floor

    The so-called ḵāleṣa or public crown lands (confiscated or abandoned land) was part of the ḵāṣṣa holdings, and often the dividing line between the two was blurred. Both stood in contrast to amlāk-e divāni or mamālek, which referred to state lands. During the 18th century the term ḵāṣṣa, as well as divāni and mamālek, fell into disuse.

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