Table of Contents

  • ʿABBĀSĪ RABENJANĪ

    Dj. Khaleghi-Motlagh

    10th century Samanid poet.

  • ʿABBĀSĪ, ŠAYḴ

    R. Skelton

    Apart from an apparently early work in the standard Isfahan style of the second quarter of the 17th century (Cristie’s 10 July 1975, lot 197), Šayḵ ʿAbbāsī departed from the established conventions of Safavid painting and embarked upon an eclectic manner in which European and Indian elements played an important role.

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  • ABBASID CALIPHATE

    C. E. Bosworth

    the third dynasty of caliphs who built their capital in Baghdad after overthrowing the Umayyad caliphs in Damascus.

  • ABD, ABDĪH

    Cross-Reference

    “marvel, wonder” in Middle Persian. See  MIRACLES i. In Ancient Iranian Tradition.

  • ʿABD-AL-ʿALĪ BAḤR-AL-ʿOLŪM

    F. Robinson

    A leading Indian theologian of the Ḥanafī school (18th century).

  • ʿABD-AL-ʿALĪ BĪRJANDĪ

    D. Pingree

    (or BARJANDĪ) Islamic astronomer, said to have died in 934/1527-28.

  • ʿABD-AL-ʿALĪM NAṢRALLĀḤ KHAN

    Hameed ud-Din

    “QAMAR,” government official, historian, biographer, translator, and grammarian in British India (19th century).

  • ʿABD-AL-ʿAẒĪM AL-ḤASANĪ

    W. Madelung

    Shiʿite ascetic and transmitter buried in the main sanctuary of Ray (9th century).

  • ʿABD-AL-ʿAZĪZ B. ʿABD-AL-VAHHĀB

    D. Duda

    ABD-AL-AZIZ B. ABD-AL-VAHHAB owed his artistic training to Shah Ṭahmāsp and was employed in the royal workshops at Tabrīz, but had his ears and nose cut off for counterfeiting a seal. However, Moṣṭafā-ʿAlī says that he was born in Isfahan, and that Shah Ṭahmāsp was his pupil.

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  • ʿABD-AL-ʿAZĪZ B. NAḎR MOḤAMMAD

    M. H. Siddiqi

    Toghay-Timurid (Janid) dynast of the Uzbeks in Bukhara (r. 1647-80).