Table of Contents

  • SAFIDRUD

    Eckart Ehlers

    With a length of 670 km the Safidrud is the second largest river of Iran.  Its headwaters are located in the Zagros ranges of northwestern Iran in the province of Kordestān.  Originating in the mountain range of the Kuh-e Čehel Čašma, the headwater region is moist and rainy.

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  • SAFINA-YE ḴOŠGU

    Stefano Pello

    An important Indo-Persian taḏkera (collection of biographical notices of poets with anthologies of their verse) of the 18th century, by Bindrāban Dās Ḵošgu.

  • SAFINE-YE SOLAYMANI

    M. Ismail Marcinkowski

    (“Ship of Solayman”), a Persian travel account of an embassy sent by the Safavid ruler Shah Solayman (r. 1666-94) to Siam in the year 1685.

  • ṢAFJĀHĪ DYNASTY

    Cross-Reference

    See DECCAN.

  • ŠAFT

    Marcel Bazin

    district and small town in southwestern Gilān.

  • ŠĀH-NĀMA iv. Illustrations

    Marianna Shreve Simpson

    It is within the medieval arts of the object, and particularly on portable ceramic and metalwork vessels made in Persia and neighboring regions during the 12th and 13th centuries, that the early history and iconography of Šāh-nāma imagery can be most fully appreciated.

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  • ŠĀH-NĀMA v. ARABIC WORDS

    John Perry

    Moïnfar calculates that the Šāh-nāma contains 706 words of Arabic origin, occurring a total of 8,938 times. The 100 words occurring most frequently account for 60 percent of all occurrences.

  • ŠĀH-NĀMA — EXCURSUS

    Amin Banani

    Essay: “Reflections on Re-reading the Iliad and the Shahnameh” by Amin Banani.

  • ŠĀH-NĀMA TRANSLATIONS iii. INTO ENGLISH

    Parvin Loloi

    Ferdowsi’s epic, the Šāh-nāma, was first introduced to English readers by Sir William Jones, who in his many essays on Oriental poetry, compared Ferdowsi to Homer.

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  • ŠĀH-NĀMA TRANSLATIONS i. INTO TURKISH

    Osman G. Özgüdenli

    Turks have been influenced by the Šāh-nāma since the advent of the Saljuqs in Persia. Their last prince in Persia, Ṭoḡrel III, recited verses from the Šāh-nāma while swinging his mace in battle.