Table of Contents

  • PERSIAN LANGUAGE i. Early New Persian

    Ludwig Paul

    Early New Persian is the first phase (8th-12th centuries CE) of the Persian language after the Islamic conquest of Iran.

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  • PERSIAN MANUSCRIPTS i. IN OTTOMAN AND MODERN TURKISH LIBRARIES

    OSMAN G. ÖZGÜDENLI

    The Persian manuscripts in the libraries of Istanbul and Anatolia today were collected from four sources: (1) Persian manuscripts written, translated, and copied in Anatolia; (2) those brought into Anatolia by immigrant scholars; (3) those brought by traders; 4) those brought as booty of the wars and conquests of the 16th and 18th centuries.

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  • PERSIS, KINGS OF

    Joseph Wiesehöfer

    the Persian dynasts who between the 2nd century BCE and 3rd century CE ruled as Parthian representatives in Persis, southwestern Iran.

  • PERSONAL NAMES, IRANIAN i. PRE-ISLAMIC NAMES: GENERAL

    Rüdiger Schmitt

    The system of formation of personal names attested in the Iranian languages to a great extent agrees with that known from most of the other Indo-European languages.

  • PERSONAL NAMES, IRANIAN ii. AVESTAN NAMES

    Rüdiger Schmitt

    In the Avesta at least 400 personal names are attested. The bulk of these names is found in the second part of the Fravardīn Yašt in a litany-like enumeration.

  • PERSONAL NAMES, IRANIAN iii. ACHAEMENID PERIOD

    Rüdiger Schmitt

    Evidence from the Achaemenid period is considerable, but in authentic sources, the inscriptions of the kings themselves, fewer than fifty names are documented in their Old Persian form.

  • PERSONAL NAMES, IRANIAN iv. PARTHIAN PERIOD

    Rüdiger Schmitt

    For the Parthian period there is no super-abundance of primary sources written in the official (Middle) Parthian administrative language.

  • PERSONAL NAMES, IRANIAN v. SASANIAN PERiOD

    Rüdiger Schmitt

    For Sasanian times, priority treatment must be given to the names attested in non-literary, that is, epigraphic sources (in the broadest sense of the word).

  • PERSONAL NAMES, IRANIAN vi. ARMENIAN NAMES OF IRANIAN ORIGIN

    Rüdiger Schmitt

    Linguistic research has documented that the majority of Iranian lexical and other borrowings in Armenian originated in the Parthian language.

  • PERSONAL NAMES, SOGDIAN i. IN CHINESE SOURCES

    Y. Yoshida

    Especially during some hundred years before the An Lushan’s rebellion (755-63 C.E.), when Tang controlled Central Asia, a great many Sogdians were encountered in northern China.