Table of Contents

  • NAḴL

    Peter Chelkowski

    As ritual objects for the ʿĀšurāʾ, naḵls are built from wood in various sizes, from simple constructions that can be carried by two persons to colossal structures about three stories high that have to be supported by hundreds of men.

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  • NAḴŠABI, ŻIĀʾ-AL-DIN

    Mohammad Karimi Zanjani Asl

    14th-century Češti mystic and author. Though originally from Naḵšab (or Nasaf, in Transoxiana), his family emigrated to India at the time of Mongol incursions.

  • NALÎ

    Keith Hitchins

    Through his extensive travels and continuous studies Nali acquired a solid knowledge of Arabic, Persian, and Turkish, which allowed him to draw on three rich literary traditions for his own work. His work, and his patriotic sentiments, were much affected, too, by the Ottoman government’s campaign to eliminate the autonomous Kurdish principalities.

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  • NĀMA-YE BĀNOVĀN

    Nassereddin Parvin

    (Women’s journal), a biweekly paper published in Tehran between 1 Mordād 1299 and 24 Khordād 1300 Š. (23 July 1920-14 June 1921).

  • NĀMA-YE BANOVAN-E IRĀN

    Nassereddin Parvin

    (The journal of the women of Iran), a weekly paper published in Tehran from Farvard in 1317 until Tir 1319 Š. (March 1938-June 1940).

  • NAQŠ-E ROSTAM

    Hubertus von Gall

    a perpendicular cliff wall in Fārs, about 6 km northwest of Persepolis, a site unusually rich in Achaemenid and Sasanian monuments.

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  • NASAFI, ʿAZIZ

    Hermann Landolt

     b. Moḥammad, 7th/13th-century mystical thinker and scholar from Nasaf (Naḵšab) in Transoxania (present Qarshi or Karshi in Uzbekistan), author of many works in Persian.

  • NASIM-e ŠEMĀL

    Nassereddin Parvin

    (in popular parlance, Nasim-e šomāl; Breeze of the North), one of the best-known and most popular periodicals in the history of Iranian journalism.

  • NAṢR (I) B. AḤMAD (I) B. ESMĀʿIL

    C. Edmund Bosworth

    ruler of the Samanid dynasty in Transoxiana and Khorasan between 301/914 and 331/943.

  • NATEL-KHANLARI, Parviz

    CROSS-REFERENCE

    See KHANLARI, Parviz.