Table of Contents

  • MIRʿALĀʾI, Aḥmad

    Jalil Doostkhah

    (1942-1995), editor of three literary magazines and translator of works of Western literature.

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  • MIRATH-E MAKTUB

    Ali Mir-Ansari

    a research center in Tehran, focused on editing manuscripts (including those concerned with the history of science), cataloguing Persian and Arabic manuscripts in Iran and the wider Persianate cultural area, and studying related codicological issues.

  • MIRDREKVANDI, ʿALI

    Philip G. Kreyenbroek

    nicknamed “Gunga Din,” author of “Irradiant,” a popular epic written in broken English in the mid-20th century.

  • MIRROR FOR PRINCES

    Cross-Reference

    genre of didactic literature, both ancient and medieval: see ADAB; ANDARZ.

  • MIRŠAKAR, MIRSAID

    Keith Hitchins

    (1912-1993), Tajik poet, dramatist, and children’s author; People’s Poet of Tajikistan, 1962.

  • MIRZA MOḤAMMAD ĀḠĀ JĀN

    Cross-Reference

    Author of Avīmāq-e Moḡol (publ. 1900), see ʿABD-AL-QĀDER KHAN.

  • MITHRA

    Multiple Authors

    i. Mitra in Old Indian and Mithra in Old Iranian   ii. Iconography in Iran and Central Asia   iii. in Manicheism

  • MITHRA ii. ICONOGRAPHY IN IRAN AND CENTRAL ASIA

    Franz Grenet

    On coins of the Arsacids the seated archer dressed as a Parthian horseman has been interpreted as Mithra. In the Kushan empire Mithra is among the deities most frequently depicted on the coinage, always as a young solar god.

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  • MITHRA i. MITRA IN OLD INDIAN AND MITHRA IN OLD IRANIAN

    Hanns-Peter Schmidt

    Indo-Iranian god, with name based on the common noun mitrá “contract” with the connotations of “covenant, agreement, treaty, alliance, promise.”

  • MITHRA iii. IN MANICHEISM

    Werner Sundermann

    The Iranian Manicheans adopted the name of the Zoroastrian god Mithra (Av. Miθra; Mid. Pers.Mihr)and used it to designate one of their own deities.