Table of Contents

  • JAPAN xii. TRANSLATIONS OF PERSIAN WORKS INTO JAPANESE

    Hashem Rajabzadeh

    Japanese readers were introduced to the Persian classics with translations of ʿOmar Ḵayyām’s Robāʿiyāt and Ferdowisi’s Šāh-nāma.

  • JAPAN xiii. TRANSLATIONS OF JAPANESE WORKS INTO PERSIAN

    Hashem Rajabzadeh

    Introduction of Japan to Persian readers began when Japanese military victories over China (1894-95) and, especially, Russia (1904-05) excited the interest of Iranians.

  • JĀRČI

    Charles Melville

    a public crier, announcer or herald, derived from the Mongol jar (proclamation, announcement). Criers or heralds naturally have a role in both civilian and military capacities.

  • JĀRČI-E MELLAT

    EIr.

    a weekly satirical newspaper published in Tehran, 1910-28 (with long interruptions).

  • JARI, TALL-E

    Yoshihiro Nishiaki

    a Fars Province site named for its two closely situated prehistoric mounds, Jari A and B. The two mounds are located approximately 12 km southeast of Persepolis.

    This Article Has Images/Tables.
  • JARQUYA

    Habib Borjian

    district located in the eastern region of Isfahan Province. i. The district. ii. The dialect.

  • JARQUYA i. The District

    Habib Borjian

    Separated from Isfahan by the Šāhkuh range, Jarquya spreads over 6,500 km², stretching in a northwest-southeast direction to the wasteland that separates it from Abarquh.

  • JARQUYA ii. The Dialect

    Habib Borjian

    The dialect of Jarquya, together with those of Rudašt and Kuhpāya to its north, belongs to the Isfahani subgroup of the Central Dialects. Only about half of the villages of the district have retained their idioms, namely Ganjābād, Siān, Yangābād, Peykān, Mazraʿa-ʿArab, and Ḥaydarābād in Lower Jarquya, and Dastgerd, Kamālābād, Ḥasanābād, Ḵārā, and Yaḵčāl in Upper Jarquya.

    This Article Has Images/Tables.
  • JARRĀḤI RIVER

    cross-reference

    See KHUZESTAN i. Geography.

  • JĀRUDIYA

    cross-reference

    See ZAIDIS.