Table of Contents

  • HAFT LANG

    Cross-Reference

    See BAḴTIĀRI TRIBE.

  • HAFT OWRANG

    cross-reference

    See JĀMI.

  • HAFT PEYKAR

    François de Blois

    a famous romantic epic by Neẓāmi Ganjavi from the last decade of the 6th/12th century. The title can be translated literally as “seven portraits,” but also with the figurative meaning of “seven beauties.”

  • HAFT QOLZOM

    Ṣafurā Hušyār

    (lit., The seven seas), the title of a Persian dictionary compiled in India in 1813-18 by Abu’l-Moẓaffar Ḡāzi-al-Din Ḥaydar (d. 1827).

  • HAFT SIN

    A. Shapur Shahbazi

    denoting “seven items beginning with the letter sin (S),”  one of the components of the rituals of the New Year’s Day festival (see NOWRUZ) observed by most Iranians. The items are traditionally displayed on the dining cloth (sofra) that every household spreads out on the floor (or on a table) in a room normally reserved for entertaining guests.

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  • HAFT TEPE

    Ezat O. Negahban

    In the 1950s and 1960s, Haft Tepe became part of a large sugar cane plantation. In the course of leveling the land for planting, some of the archaeological remains were destroyed and others exposed. During the construction of the main road to the plantation, a baked brick wall was uncovered and the discovery reported to the Iranian Archaeological Service.

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  • HAFTA

    Badri Gharib

    (“week”), history of the calendar week in Iran.

  • HAFTĀNBŌXT

    Mansour Shaki

    traditional reading of the name of a legendary warlord in southern Persia, mentioned in the Kār-nāmag ī Ardašīr ī Pābagān (The exploits of Ardašīr son of Pābag).

  • HAFTAVĀN TEPE

    Charles Burney

    one of the three largest settlement mounds in the Urmia basin, Azerbaijan, covering fifty acres and not far from the village of Haftavān, itself barely two miles from the district town of Salmās.

  • HAFTŌRANG

    Antonio Panaino

    the circumpolar constellation Ursa Major (UMa),  known in Young Avestan literature under the appellative of haptōiriṇga- (only pl. with star- “star”).