Table of Contents

  • HAFTVĀD

    A. Shapur Shahbazi

    (Haftwād), the hero of a legend associated with the rise of the Sasanian Ardašir I (r. 224-39). The Šāh-nāma gives his “strange story” (dāstān-e šegeft).

  • HAGIOGRAPHIC LITERATURE

    Jürgen Paul

    in Persia and Central Asia. Hagiographic literature may be defined broadly as a biographical genre devoted to individuals enjoying an exclusive religious status as “saints” or “holy men” in the eyes of the authors.

  • HAGMATĀNA

    Cross-Reference

    See HAMADĀN.

  • HAIFA

    Hossein Amanat

    a port city in northwestern Israel and the site of a number of significant Bahai holy places, administrative buildings, and historical monuments. Bahais consider it their most sacred location after the shrine of Mirzā Ḥosayn-ʿAli Nuri Bahāʾ-Allāh, the prophet of the Bahai faith, situated across the bay in nearby ʿAkkā.

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  • HAIKU

    Eva Lucie Witte

    a Japanese poetic form adopted and employed by Iranian poets since the second half of the 20th century.

  • ḤAIM, MOREH ḤAḴĀM

    Amnon Netzer

    eminent Jewish scholar (b. Tehran, 1872; d. Tehran, 1942).

  • ḤAIM, ŠEMUʾEL

    Amnon Netzer

    generally known as Monsieur Ḥaim or Mister Ḥaim, journalist and Majles deputy (b. Kermānšāh, 1891; executed Tehran, Dec. 15, 1931).

  • ḤAIM, SOLAYMĀN

    Amnon Netzer

    twentieth-century lexicographer, became known as one of the first serious lexicographers to prepare Persian-language dictionaries into and from English, French and Hebrew (1886-1970).

  • HAJAR

    Cross-Reference

    See BAHRAIN.

  • HAJĀR

    cross-reference

    See ŠARAFKANDI, ʿABD-AL-RAḤMĀN.

  • ḤĀJEB

    C. Edmund Bosworth, Rudi Matthee

    administrative and then military office in the pre-modern Iranian world.

  • ḤĀJEB i. IN THE MEDIEVAL ISLAMIC PERIOD

    C. Edmund Bosworth

    The office of ḥājeb, implying military command, appears in the Iranian world with the Samanids, where it probably grew out of the amir’s domestic household.

  • ḤĀJEB ii. IN THE SAFAVID AND QAJAR PERIODS

    Rudi Matthee

    In the Safavid period the ḥājeb, the major domo or master of ceremony, was called the išik-āqāsi-bāši, literally “head of the masters of the threshold.”

  • ḤĀJI ʿALILU

    Pierre Oberling

    a Turkic tribe of Persian Azerbaijan. Its main branch lives north of Varzaqān and Ahar, in Qarājadāḡ (Arasbārān); another branch dwells in the vicinity of Marāḡa.

  • ḤĀJI ĀQĀ

    F. Farzaneh

    a satirical novella by Ṣādeq Hedāyat, published in the journal Soḵan in 1945, followed by a second edition in 1952.

  • ḤĀJI BĀBĀ

    Nasseredin Parvin

    a satirical and politically critical newspaper, published in Tehran, 1949-53.

  • ḤĀJI BĀBĀ AFŠĀR

    Anna Vanzan

    son of an officer in the army of the Crown Prince ʿAbbās Mirzā and one of the first Persian students sent to study in Europe (1811).

  • ḤĀJI BĀBĀ OF EṢFAHĀN

    cross-reference

    See HAJJI BABA OF ISPAHAN.

  • ḤĀJI FIRUZ

    Mahmoud Omidsalar

    the most famous among the traditional folk entertainers, who appears in the Persian streets in the days preceding Nowruz. The Ḥāji Firuz entertains passers-by by singing traditional songs and dancing and playing his tambourine for a few coins. He rarely knocks on a door, but begins his performance as soon as the door is opened.

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  • ḤĀJI MIRZĀ ĀQĀSI

    Cross-Reference

    grand vizier of Moḥammad Shah Qāǰār (r. 1250-64/1834-48) between 1251-64/1835-48. See ĀQĀSI, ḤĀJI MIRZĀ.