Table of Contents

  • ḤAYDAR ʿALI EṢFAHĀNI, Ḥājji Mirzā

    Moojan Momen

    (b. Isfahan, ca. 1830; d. Haifa, 1920), Bahāʾi polemicist.

  • ḤAYDAR KHAN ʿAMU-OḠLI

    Alireza Sheikholeslami

    (1880-1921), revolutionary activist who used terror to radicalize Persian politics in the early 20th century. Forced to leave Persia in 1911, he was sent back by the Bolsheviks to settle the conflict between the Jangalis and the Communist Party of Persia in Gilān. It is almost certain that he was killed by a group of Jangalis soon afterwards.

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  • ḤAYDAR MIRZĀ ṢAFAVI

    Michel M. Mazzaoui

    Safavid prince who considered himself to be the chosen successor of his father, Shah Ṭahmāsb, but was killed immediately after the latter’s death on 14 May 1576.

  • ḤAYDAR, Mir

    Cross-Reference

    See MANGHITS.

  • ḤAYDARI and NEʿMATI

    John R. Perry

    (also Amir-Ḥaydari; Neʿmat-Allāhi), mutually hostile urban moieties of Safavid and post-Safavid Iran.

  • HĀYEDA

    Erik Nakjavani

    the stage name of MAʿṢUMA DADEBĀLĀ (b. Tehran, 1942; d. San Jose, Calif., 1990), popular Persian singer. Hāyeda primarily distinguished herself by a naturally rich, operatic alto voice. For nearly two decades, she performed the āvāz and interpreted popular traditional and contemporary songs, all based on the modal system of traditional Persian music.

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  • ḤAYRAT, MOḤAMMAD ṢEDDIQ

    Habib Borjian

    (1878-1902) Tajik poet from Bukhar, literary scholars praise him as one of the best Persian poets of the late 19th century

  • ḤAYYA ʿALĀ ḴAYR AL-ʿAMAL

    Meir M. Bar-Asher

    a religious formula, meaning “Come to the best of actions,” included in the call to prayer (aḏān) by all three major branches of Shiʿism, Twelvers, Zaydis and Ismaʿilis.

  • HAŽĀR

    Keith Hitchins

    pen name of ʿABD-AL-RAḤMĀN ŠARAFKANDI (b. Mahābād, 1921; d. Tehran, 1991), Kurdish poet, philologist, and translator. A master of traditional Kurdish poetry, he infused the content of his poems with a new, uncompromising militancy. His language is simple and direct, close to the spoken form, because he passionately believed in the social mission of art and wanted his works to be read and understood by all.

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  • HAZĀR AFSĀN

    Cross-Reference

    Arabic title of The Arabian Nights, the world-famous collection of tales. See ALF LAYLA WA LAYLA.