Table of Contents

  • ḤAMAYD

    Pierre Oberling

    an Arab tribe of Ḵuzestān. In the early 1900s, it dwelled mostly in the boluk of Ḥamayd, on the left bank of the Kārun river.

  • HAMĀZŌR

    Mary Boyce and F. M. Kotwal

    a Zoroastrian Persian adjective “of the same strength” which occurs only in a formula of greeting, in ritual uses accompanied by the giving of hands.

  • ḤAMD-ALLĀH MOSTAWFI

    Charles Melville

    historian and geographer of the Il-khanid period (1281-1344), author of Tāriḵ-e gozida, Ẓafar-nāma, and Nozhat al-qolub.

  • ḤAMDĀN QARMAṬ

    Wilferd Madelung

    b. al-Ašʿaṯ (d. 933), Ismaʿili dāʿi and founder of the Ismaʿili movement in Iraq.

  • HAMDARD ISLAMICUS

    Ansar Zahid Khan

    English-language quarterly for Islamic Studies, founded in Pakistan in 1978. Published by the Hamdard Foundation of Pakistan.

  • ḤĀMED BAL-ḴEŻR AL-ḴOJANDI

    David Pingree

    , ABU MAḤMUD, mathematician and astronomer of the 10th century. His nesba suggests that he originated from Ḵojand in Ferḡāna.

  • ḤĀMEDI EṢFAHĀNI

    Tahsin Yazici

    (or Ḥāmedi ʿAjam), a poet of Persian origin (1439-ca. 1485) at the court of the Ottoman Sultan Moḥammad Fāteḥ (Mehmed the Conquerer).

  • HAMĒSTAGĀN

    Philippe Gignoux

    a word of uncertain etymology, used in Pahlavi literature to designate the intermediate stage between paradise and hell.

  • HAMGAR, MAJDE

    Dabiḥ-Allāh Safā

    , Majd-al-Din b. Aḥmad, known also as Ebn-e Hamgar (hamgar means “weaver”), an important poet of the 7th/13th century (1210-1287).

  • ḤAMID QALANDAR

    Khaliq Ahmad Nizami

    (d. 1366), author of Ḵayr al-majāles, the obiter dicta (malfuẓāt) of the Češti shaikh Naṣir-al-Din Maḥmud Čerāḡ-e Dehli, Ḥamid’s father,