Table of Contents

  • HA-GE’ULLAH

    Amnon Netzer

    Judeo-Persian weekly newspaper published in Tehran between 1920 and 1923.

  • HAAS, WILLIAM S.

    Hossein Kamaly

    (1883-1956), German-born Iranist, advisor to the Iranian ministry of education and a pioneer of Iranian studies in the United States. 

  • ḤABAQUQ, TOMB OF

    S. Soroudi

    This brick monument, the overall shape of which is comparable with the tomb of Amir Timur in Samarqand, consists essentially of an octagonal tower topped by a conical roof. Each of the eight sides of the roughly 7 meter high tower is embellished with the design of an inset arch.

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  • ḤABIB AL-ESLĀM

    Nasser-al-Din Parvin

    Persian-language weekly newspaper published in Kabul, 1929 replacing Amān-e afḡān at the time of Bačča-ye Saqqā.

  • ḤABIB EṢFAHĀNI

    Tahsin Yazıcı

    , MIRZĀ, Iranian poet, grammarian, and translator (1835-93), who spent much of his life in exile in Ottoman Turkey. He is noted for his Persian grammar, Dastur-e Soḵan (Istanbul, 1872), which is regarded as the first systematic grammar of the Persian language and served as a model for many later works.

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  • ḤABIB-ALLĀH

    Ludwig W. Adamec

    , Amir, monarch who initiated modernization in Afghanistan (b. 1872, d. 1919).

  • ḤABIB-ALLĀH ḴORĀSĀNI

    Jalal Matini

    , Hājj Mirzā, an enlightened religious scholar of Mašhad and a poet (1850-1909).

  • ḤABIB-ALLĀH SĀVAJI

    Barbara Schmitz

    (1587-1628), one of the more conservative artists active during the reign of Shah ʿAbbās I (r. 1587-1628). All we know about him, besides his paintings, is the brief note by his contemporary Qāżi Aḥmad, who, writing in 1596, referred to him as a masterful artist distinguished among his peers.

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  • ḤABIBĀBĀDI, MOʿALLEM

    Cross-Reference

    See MOʿALLEM ḤABIBĀBĀDI.

  • ḤABIBIYA SCHOOL

    Ludwig W. Adamec

    an elite high school for boys established in 1903 in Kabul and named after its founder, Amir Ḥabib-Allāh.

  • ḤABL AL-MATIN

    Nassereddin Parvin

    (lit. strong cord), name of three newspapers published in Calcutta, Tehran, and Rašt.

  • ḤABLARUD

    M. H. Ganji

    river in Damāvand and Garmsār districts of Semnān province in northern Persia.

  • ḤADĀʾEQ AL-SEḤR

    N. Y. Chalisova

    shortened title of the famous treatise Ḥadāʾeq al-seḥr fi daqāʾeq al-šeʿr (“Gardens of magic in the subtleties of poetry”) by Rašid(-e) Waṭwāt (d. 1182-83).

  • HADAF EDUCATIONAL GROUP

    Aḥmad Birašk

    (Goruh-e Farhangi-e Hadaf), a pioneering private educational complex founded in Tehran in 1949-50.

  • HĀDI ḤASAN

    K. A. Jaisi

    Indian scholar of Persian literature (1894-1963).

  • HĀDI SABZAVĀRI

    Seyyed Hossein Nasr

    , Shaikh Mollā (1797-1873), the most famous Islamic philosopher of the Qajar period, as well as an outstanding theologian and a notable poet.

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  • ḤADIQAT AL-ḤAQIQA WA ŠARIʿAT AL-ṬARIQA

    J.T.P. de Bruijn

    a Persian didactical maṯnawi by the twelfth-century poet Ḥakim Majdud b. Ādam Sanāʾi.

  • HADIŠ (1)

    cross-reference

    See PALACE i. ACHAEMENID.

  • HADIŠ (2)

    Mary Boyce

    the Avestan name of a minor Zoroastrian divinity, glossed in Pahlavi (tr. of Visprad 1:9) by mēnōg ī xānag “Spirit of the house.”

  • HADITH

    Shahab Ahmed, A. Kazemi-Moussavi, Ismail K. Poonawala, Hamid Algar, Shaul Shaked

    term denoting reports that convey the normative words and deeds of the Prophet Moḥammad; it is understood to refer generically to the entire corpus of this literature and to the thousands of individual reports that comprise it.