Table of Contents

  • GORGIJANIDZE, PARSADAN

    Jemshid Giunashvili

    (1626-1696), a Georgian literary figure and historian who served in the Safavid administration as deputy governor of Isfahan and royal chamberlain.

  • GORGIN

    Djalal Khaleghi-Motlagh

    son of Milād, one of the heroes of the reigns of Kay Kāvus and Kay Ḵosrow and the head of the Milād family.

  • GORGIN KHAN

    Rudi Matthee

    also known as Giorgio XI and Šāhnavāz Khan II; Georgian prince (d. 1709), who was alternately ruler of Georgia and holder of high positions in the Safavid administration and military.

  • GORGIN, IRAJ

    Mandana Zandian

    (1935-2012), radio and television broadcaster, journalist, and the founder of several Persian radio and television networks, whose life and career unfolded in two distinct sociopolitical milieus, in Iran in the two decades that culminated in the Revolution of 1979 and in exile over the subsequent three decades of his life.

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  • GORJESTĀN

    Cross-Reference

    See GEORGIA.

  • GORUH-E FARHANGI-E HADAF

    Cross-Reference

    See HADAF EDUCATIONAL GROUP.

  • GORUH-E FARHANGI-E ḴᵛĀRAZMI

    Cross-Reference

    See ḴᵛĀRAZMI SCHOOLS.

  • GORZ

    Jalil Doostkhah

    or gorza, gorz-e gāvsār/sar, lit. "ox-headed club/mace,"  a weapon often mentioned and variously described in Iranian myths and epic. In classical Persian texts, particularly in Ferdowsi’s Šāh-nāma, it is characterized as the decisive weapon of choice in fateful battles.

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  • GORZEVĀN

    C. Edmund Bosworth

    a town in the medieval Islamic region of Guzgān in northern Afghanistan.

  • GŌŠ YAŠT

    W. W. Malandra

    the title of the ninth Yašt of the Avesta, also known as Drwāsp Yašt, after the goddess Druuāspā (see DRVĀSPĀ) to whom, in fact, it is dedicated.