Table of Contents

  • GAZ (1)

    B. Grami, M. R. Ghanoonparvar

    common term in Persian for several species of the genera Tamarix (desert trees) and Astragalus (spiny shrubs of gavan); also the name of a confection made with the sweet exudate (gaz-angobīn) produced on Astragalus.

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  • GAZ (2)

    Minu Yusofnezhad

    or Jaz; a town in the province of Isfahan, of the šahrestān of Barḵᵛār and Mayma, situated 18 km north of the city of Isfahan at an altitude of 1,578 m above sea level.

  • ḠAZĀ

    Cross-Reference

    See ISLAM IN IRAN xi. JIHAD IN ISLAM.

  • GAZA

    Cross-Reference

    See GANZAK.

  • GAZACA

    Cross-Reference

    See GANZAK.

  • ḠAŻĀʾERĪ

    Etan Kohlberg

    nesba of two Imami authors and traditionists (10th-11th centuries).

  • ḠAŻĀʾERĪ RĀZĪ, ABŪ ZAYD MOḤAMMAD

    François de Blois

    or ḠAŻĀYERĪ RĀZĪ, b. ʿALĪ, Persian poet of the early 11th century.

  • ḠAZAL i. HISTORY

    J. T. P. de Bruijn

    the most important Persian lyric, adopted also by literatures influenced by the classical Persian tradition, in particular Turkish and Urdu poetry. OVERVIEW of entry: i. History, ii. Characteristics and Conventions.

  • ḠAZAL ii. CHARACTERISTICS AND CONVENTIONS

    Ehsan Yarshater

    The Persian ḡazal, especially the Hafezian and the post-Hafezian, does not usually follow a sustained narrative, but consists of a number of lines and statements largely independent of each other.

  • ḠAZĀLĪ MAŠHADĪ

    Munibur Rahman

    (b. Mašhad, 1526-27, d. Ahmadabad, 1572), poet laureate in Persian (malek-al-šoʿarāʾ) at the court of the Mughal emperor Akbar.