Table of Contents

  • FARANGĪ MAḤALL

    Muhammad Wali-ul-Haq Ansari

    or FERANGĪ MAḤAL; family of Indian Muslim teachers, Hanafite scholars, and mystics active over the last 300 years.

  • FARANGĪS

    Djalal Khaleghi-Motlagh

    eldest daughter of Afrāsīāb and wife of Sīāvaḵš.

  • FARAS-NĀMA

    Īraj Afšār

    a category of books and manuals dealing with horses and horsemanship. Topics treated in this literary genre include horse-breeding, grazing, dressage, veterinary advice, horseracing and betting, and the art of divination based on the mien and movements of horses.

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  • FARĀVA

    C. Edmund Bosworth

    or Parau, a small medieval town in eastern Persia, lying east of the Caspian Sea and just beyond the northern edge of the Kopet-Dag range facing the Kara Kum desert.

  • FARDIN, Moḥammad ʿAli

    Jamsheed Akrami

    Fardin’s 23-year film career blossomed late, after a short stint in the theater, and it suffered an early demise in 1981 when the Islamic Republic of Iran banned him from filmmaking in a wholesale purge of the major entertainers of the pre-revolution era.

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  • FĀRES

    C. Edmund Bosworth

    the Arabic term for “rider on a horse, cavalryman,” connected with the verb farasa/farosa “to be knowledgeable about horses, be a skillful horseman” and the noun faras “horse."

  • FĀRESĪ, ABŪ ʿALĪ

    Cross-Reference

    See ABŪ ʿALĪ FĀRESĪ.

  • FĀRESĪ, KAMĀL-AL-DĪN ABU’L-ḤASAN MOḤAMMAD

    Gül A. Russell

    (d. 1320), the most significant figure in optics after Ebn al-Hayṯam (Alhazen; 965-1040). The two names have been linked due to his critical revision of Ebn al-Hayṯam’s Ketāb al-manāẓer, which represents a watershed in the scientifi;c understanding of light and vision.

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  • FĀRESĪYĀT

    Aḥmad Mahdawī Dāmḡānī

    a literary term used in Arabic literature to refer to poems in Arabic which contain some Persian words or even phrases in their original form, the most notable example being the Fāresīyāt of Abū Nowās.

  • FARḠĀNA

    C. Edmund Bosworth

    valley of the Syr Darya (Jaxartes) river extending ca. 300 km between the Farḡāna mountains in the east and the first sharp bend of the river’s course to the north.

  • FARḠĀNĪ, AḤMAD

    David Pingree

    b. Moḥammad b. Kaṯīr (fl. ca. 950 C.E.), Muslim astronomer.

  • FARḠĀNĪ, EMĀM-AL-ḤARAMAYN SERĀJ-Al-DĪN ABU’L-MOḤAMMAD ʿALĪ

    Sayyāra Mahīnfar

    b. ʿOṯmān Ūšī or Ūsī (d. 1173), oṣūlī jurist (faqīh), traditionist, and author.

  • FARḠĀNĪ, SAʿĪD-AL-DĪN MOHAMMAD

    William C. Chittick

    b. Ahmad (d. 1300), Sufi author from the town of Kāsān in Farḡān.

  • FARḠĀNĪ, SAYF-AL-DĪN MOḤAMMAD

    Sayyāra Mahīnfar

    thirteenth century Persian poet and Sufi of Farḡāna.

  • FARHĀD (1)

    Heshmat Moayyad

    romantic figure in Persian legend and literature, best known from the poetry of Neẓāmī Ganjavī as a rival with the Sasanian king Ḵosrow II Parvēz (r. 591-628) for the love of the beautiful Armenian princess Šīrīn.

  • FARHĀD (2)

    Cross-Reference

    name of a number of Parthian kings. See PHRAATES.

  • FARHĀD KHAN QARAMĀNLŪ, ROKN-AL-SALṬANA

    Rudi Matthee

    military commander of Shah ʿAbbās I, executed at the Shah’s orders in 1598.

  • FARHĀD MĪRZĀ MOʿTAMAD-AL-DAWLA

    Kambiz Eslami

    (1818-1888), Qajar prince-governor and bibliophile. Holding highly conservative religious views on the administration of Persia, he viewed Nāṣer-al-Dīn Shah's reformist vizier as an obliterator of the “foundation of the Muslim šarīʿa,” who was guilty of spreading the word “liberty” among the people.

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  • FARHANG

    Nassereddin Parvin

    the title of five newspapers and magazines printed in Persia and Europe.

  • FARHANG Ī OĪM

    Cross-Reference

    See FRAHANG Ī OĪM.