Table of Contents

  • FICTION, i

    J. T. P. de Bruijn

    OVERVIEW of the entry: i. TRADITIONAL FORMS. This article deals with all kinds of stories written for specifically literary purposes up to the time when narrative prose in the modern style, derived from the West, was introduced in Persia.

  • FICTION, ii(a)

    SĪMĪN BEHBAHĀNĪ and EIr

    ii(a). HISTORICAL BACKGROUND OF MODERN FICTION.  The long reign of Nāṣer-al-Dīn Shah (1848-96) and the Constitutional Revolution a decade after his death witnessed the gradual emergence of modern fiction in Persia.

  • FICTION, ii(b)

    Houra Yavari

    ii(b). THE NOVEL.

  • FICTION, ii(c)

    Jamāl Mīrṣādeqī

    ii(c). THE SHORT STORY. Historically, the modern Persian short story has undergone three stages of development: a formative period, a period of consolidation and growth, and a period of diversity.

  • FICTION, ii(d)

    Houra Yavari

    ii(d). THE POST-REVOLUTIONARY SHORT STORY. The post-revolutionary short story is marked by its formal sophistication and has carved out a distinct and experimental space of its own in fiction.

  • FICTION, ii(e)

    Houra Yavari

    ii(e). POST-REVOLUTIONARY FICTION ABROAD. Not only were the novel and short story imported genres, the very first works of Persian fiction were either written or first published outside Persia.

  • FICTION, ii(f)

    Houra Yavari

    ii(f). BY PERSIANS IN NON-PERSIAN LANGUAGES. Persian fiction is not limited to works written in the Persian language, or to works written within the geographical boundaries of Persia herself.

  • FICTION, ii(g)

    Shahwali Ahmadi

    ii(g). IN AFGHANISTAN. The introduction of modern fiction in Afghanistan was concomitant with the institution of new educational and literary organizations, namely the Ḥabībīya School and Anjoman-e adabī, and the publication of the bi-weekly Serāj al-aḵbār-e afḡānīya, edited by Maḥmūd Ṭarzī, in the early twentieth century.

  • FICTION, ii(h)

    Keith Hitchins

    ii(h). IN TAJIKISTAN. Tajik fiction in the 20th century has drawn from a variety of sources.

  • FIEF

    Cross-Reference

    See EQṬĀʿ; LAND TENURE.

  • FIG

    Hušang Aʿlam

    the “fruit” of several species and subspecies of Ficus L. (fam. Moraceae) in the geobotanical area covered by K. H. Rechinger’s Flora Iranica.

  • FIGUEROA, GARCÍA DE SILVA Y

    Michele Bernardini

    (b. Zafra, 1550; d. at sea returning from Persia, 1624), Spanish diplomat and traveler.

  • FIGURES OF SPEECH

    Cross-reference

    See BADIʿ (1).

  • FĪL

    Cross-Reference

    See ELEPHANT.

  • FILBERT

    Cross-Reference

    See HAZELNUT.

  • FILIPPI, FILIPPO DE

    Anna Vanzan

    (1814-1867), a professor of zoology and comparative anatomy at Turin University.

  • FILM PRODUCTION

    Cross-Reference

    See Supplement; see also CINEMA.

  • FĪN

    Cross-Reference

    strict and spring near Kāšān. See BĀḠ-E FĪN.

  • FINKENSTEIN, TREATY OF

    Cross-Reference

    See FRANCE iii; GARDANE MISSION.

  • FIRE

    Cross-reference

    See ĀDUR, ĀTAŠ, ĀTAŠKADA.