Table of Contents

  • FESANJĀN

    Etrat Elahi

    (fesenjūn, fasūjan), a well known Persian dish (ḵoreš, a kind of stew) made of walnut or almond, poultry (usually duck) or small meat balls (kalla gonješkī) and pomegranate sauce or juice.

  • FESTIVALS

    Multiple Authors

    This article treats mainly religious or communal festivals and commemorations in Persia and Afghanistan.

  • FESTIVALS i. ZOROASTRIAN

    Mary Boyce

    fall into two broad categories. There are the seven feasts of obligation, that is, No Rōz (Nowrūz) and the six gāhānbārs (gāhāmbār; q.v.), which formed the framework of the religious year, and which it was a sin not to keep; and others, which it was a merit, not a duty, to observe.

  • FESTIVALS ii. MANICHEAN

    Werner Sundermann

    The Manichean calendar of holidays proves independence from that of the Zoroastrians. Even if the heptavalent number of the Manichean Yimkis was correlated to the Zoroastrian gāhānbār and Nowrūz

  • FESTIVALS iii, iv, v

    Anne H. Betteridge and EIr, Philip G. Kreyenbroek, Keith Hitchins

    iii. SHI'ITE, iv. YAZIDI AND AHL-E HAQQ, v. KURDISH (SUNNI).

  • FESTIVALS vi, vii, viii

    Moojan Momen, Amnon Netzer, A. Arkun

    vi. BAHAI, vii. JEWISH, viii. ARMENIAN.

  • FESTIVALS ix. Assyrian

    WILLIAM PIROYAN and EDEN NABY

    The adoption of Christianity by the Assyrians in the latter part of the 1st century led to the harmonization of older community celebrations and commemorations with Christian doctrine as well as the introduction of specifically Christian religious holidays.

  • FESTIVALS x. IN AFGHANISTAN

    NANCY HATCH DUPREE

    Festive ceremonies in Afghanistan mark special religious days and major events in individual life cycles. Few are formally organized, being celebrated primarily to keep family bonds strong and community ties congenial.

  • FEṬR

    Cross-Reference

    See FESTIVALS iii.

  • FEṬRAT ZARDŪZ SAMARQANDĪ, SAYYED KAMĀL

    Michael Zand

    (1660-1699), Tajik poet.

  • FEṬRAT, ʿABD-AL-RAʾŪF BOḴĀRĪ

    Habib Borjian

    (b. Bukhara, ca. 1886; d. Tashkent, 1938), teacher, man of letters, and the most important thinker of the Jadid movement of modern Central Asia.

  • FETYĀN

    Cross-reference

    See ʿAYYĀR; JAVĀNMARDI.

  • FEUDALISM

    Cross-Reference

    European term sometimes applied to medieval Persia; see EQṬĀʿ.

  • FEUVRIER, JEAN-BAPTISTE

    Jean Calmard

    (1842-1926), Nāṣer-al-Dīn Shah’s personal physician (1889-1892), author of Trois ans à la cour de Perse, with engravings from photographs in the collections of Nāṣer-al-Dīn Shah and his retinue, Feuvrier’s own drawings, and Persian contemporary paintings. The book is a major source of information, notably on the Tobacco Concession and its aftermath.

    This Article Has Images/Tables.
  • FEVZİ EFENDİ, MEḤMED

    Tahsın Yazici

    or FAWZĪ (b. Denizli, 1826; d. Istanbul, 1900), Ottoman author who wrote some books in Persian.

  • FEVZİ MOSTĀRĪ

    Hamid Algar

    or FAWZĪ (d. 1747), author of the Bolbolestān, an imitation of Saʿdī’s Golestān, the only prose work written in Persian known to be by a Bosnian author.

  • FEYLĪ

    Pierre Oberling

    group of Lor tribes located mainly in Luristan.

  • FEYLĪ DIALECT

    Cross-Reference

    See LORĪ.

  • FICTION

    Multiple Authors

    i. Traditional Forms. ii. Modern Fiction. ii(a). Historical Background. ii(b). The Novel. ii(c). The Short Story. ii(d). The Post-Revolutionary Short Story. ii(e). Post-Revolutionary Fiction Abroad. ii(f). By Persians in Non-Persian Languages. ii(g). In Afghanistan. ii(h). In Tajikistan.

  • FICTION, i

    J. T. P. de Bruijn

    OVERVIEW of the entry: i. TRADITIONAL FORMS. This article deals with all kinds of stories written for specifically literary purposes up to the time when narrative prose in the modern style, derived from the West, was introduced in Persia.