Table of Contents

  • EʿTEMĀD-AL-DAWLA

    Cross-Reference

    lit. “Confidant of the State”; an important title given to people in the administration favored by the court.

  • EʿTEMĀD-AL-DAWLA, ĀQĀ KHAN NŪRĪ

    Abbas Amanat

    , MĪRZĀ (1807-1865), prime minister (ṣadr-e aʿẓam) of Persia (1851-58) under Nāṣer-al-Dīn Shah Qajar. Though relatively young when he took office, he represented the old school of Qajar statecraft. His very appearance, with a long beard, ornamented robes, and lavish entourage, as well as his love of  titles, decorations and other emblems of power, and court protocol, all conjured up images of Fatḥ-ʿAlī Shah’s (d. 1834) era.

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  • EʿTEMĀD-AL-DAWLA, EBRĀHĪM KALĀNTAR

    Cross-Reference

    See EBRĀHĪM KALĀNTAR.

  • EʿTEMĀD-AL-DAWLA, GĪĀṮ-AL-DĪN MOḤAMMAD BEG TEHRĀNĪ

    Cross-Reference

    Gīāṯ-al-Dīn Moḥammad Tehrānī (d. 1622), prime minister of the Mughal emperor Jahāngīr and father of the emperor’s wife, Nūr Jahān. See GĪĀṮ BEG.

  • EʿTEMĀD-AL-SALṬANA, MOḤAMMAD-ḤASAN KHAN MOQADDAM MARĀḠAʾĪ

    Abbas Amanat

    or ṢANĪʿ-AL-DAWLA (1843-1896), Qajar statesman, scholar, and author.

  • EʿTEṢĀMĪ, MĪRZĀ YŪSOF KHAN ĀŠTĪĀNĪ, EʿTEṢĀM-AL-MOLK

    Heshmat Moayyad

    (b. Tabrīz, 1874; d. Tehran, 1938), Persian writer and journalist.

  • EʿTEṢĀMĪ, PARVĪN

    Heshmat Moayyad

    Parvīn was only seven or eight years old when her poetic talent revealed itself. Encouraged by her father, she rendered into verse some literary pieces that her father had translated from Western sources. Her earliest known poems, eleven compositions printed in 1921-22 issues of her father’s monthly magazine, Bahār, display maturity of thought and craft.

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  • EʿTEŻĀD-AL-DAWLA

    Cross-Reference

    See SOLAYMĀN KHAN QĀJĀR QOVĀNLŪ.

  • EʿTEŻĀD-AL-SALṬANA, ʿALĪQOLĪ MĪRZĀ

    Abbas Amanat

    (1822-1880), first minister of sciences (ʿolūm, meaning education) of the Qajar period and a scholar.

  • ETHÉ, CARL HERMANN

    J. T. P. de Bruijn

    Initially Ethe worked as an assistant librarian at the Bodleian, on leave of absence from the University of Munich. In 1874 he abandoned his lectureship in Germany and settled down in Great Britain permanently. The motivation for this move may have been political, at least in part, because Ethé is described as “a German radical, . . . a persona ingrata with absolutist governments”

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