Table of Contents

  • ELTON, JOHN

    John Perry

    (?-1751), English merchant, seaman and shipbuilder for Nāder Shah Afšār.

  • ĒLTOTMEŠ, ŠAMS-AL-DĪN

    Peter Jackson

    (d. 1236), first Sultan of Delhi.

  • ELWELL-SUTTON, LAURENCE PAUL

    C. Edmund Bosworth

    Elwell-Sutton’s interests and publications in Persian studies fall into five categories: Persian language; Persian literature; modern Persian history and politics; Persian folklore; and Islamic science. In the first of these, his Colloquial Persian and Elementary Persian Grammar have remained in print as standard works.

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  • ELYĀSIDS

    Cross-Reference

    See ĀL-E ELYĀS.

  • ELYMAIS

    John F. Hansman

    semi-independent state frequently subject to Parthian domination, which existed between the second century B.C.E. and the early third century C. E. in the territories of Ḵūzestān, in southwestern Persia.

  • ʿEMĀD ḤASANĪ, MĪR, ʿEMĀD-AL-MOLK

    Kambiz Eslami

    b. Ebrāhīm (ca. 1554-1615), celebrated calligrapher. His rendition of nastaʿlīq, with smooth lines, many curves, very occasional diacritical marks, symmetry of letters and words, and usually excellent choice of decorations surrounding the words, had widespread appeal during his lifetime and after his death.

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  • ʿEMĀD-AL-DAWLA

    C. Edmund Bosworth

    b. Būya b. Fanā-Ḵosrow, the eldest of three brothers who came to power in western Persia during the tenth century as military adventurers and founded the Buyid dynasty.

  • ʿEMĀD-al-DAWLA, Mīrzā MOḤAMMAD-ṬĀHER

    Kathryn Babayan

    WAḤĪD QAZVĪNĪ (ca. 1615-1701), poet and Safavid court historiographer for nearly three decades (1645-74).

  • ʿEMĀD-AL-DĪN ʿALĪ FAQĪH KERMĀNĪ

    J. T. P. de Bruijn

    mystic and poet of the 14th century who used ʿEmād or, more rarely, ʿEmād-e Faqīh, as a pen name.

  • ʿEMĀD-AL-DĪN KĀTEB, ABŪ ʿABD-ALLĀH MOḤAMMAD

    Donald S. Richards

    b. Moḥammad b. Ḥāmed EṢFAHĀNĪ, an eminent 12th-century government servant and man of letters, born in Isfahan in 1125.

  • ʿEMĀD-AL-DĪN MAḤMŪD

    Emilie Savage-Smith

    b. Serāj-al-Dīn Masʿūd ŠĪRĀZĪ, the most prominent member of a 16th-century family of physicians in Shiraz.

  • ʿEMĀD-AL-DĪN MARZBĀN, ABŪ KĀLĪJĀR

    C. Edmund Bosworth

    b. Solṭān-al-Dawla Abū Šojāʿ (1009-48), amir of the Buyid dynasty in the period of that family’s decadence and incipient disintegration, being the last effective ruler of the line.

  • ʿEMĀD-AL-ESLĀM

    Maria E. Subtelny

    b. Moḥammad ʿAtīq-Allāh (1470-1506), a vizier of the Timurid Sultan Ḥosayn Bāyqarā, executed in Herat in 1498.

  • ʿEMĀD-AL-KOTTĀB, MOḤAMMAD-ḤOSAYN SAYFĪ QAZVĪNĪ

    ʿAbd-Allāh Forādi

    (b. Qazvīn, 16 April 1866; d. Tehran, 17 July 1936), calligrapher.

  • ʿEMĀDĪ RĀZĪ

    Taqi Pūr-Nāmdārīān

    poet of the first half of the 12th century.

  • EMĀM

    Cross-Reference

    (Imam), see SHIʿITE DOCTRINE; ČAHĀRDAH MAʿSŪM.

  • EMĀM ṢĀḤEB

    Mehrdad Shokouhi

    two archeological sites in Afghanistan: (1) a village near the south bank of the Amū Daryā, about 50 km north of Qondūz, (2) a village in the Jōzjān region, south of the river Balḵāb, halfway between Balḵ and Āqča.

  • EMĀM-AL-ḤARAMAYN

    Cross-Reference

    See JOVAYNĪ, Emām-al-Ḥaramayn.

  • EMĀM-E ḠĀʾEB

    Cross-Reference

    "The Hidden Imam." See ḠAYBA and ISLAM IN IRAN vii. THE CONCEPT OF MAHDI IN TWELVER SHIʿISM.

  • EMĀM-E JOMʿA

    Hamid Algar

    leader of the congregational prayer performed at midday on Fridays.